JOTTINGS and HISTORICAL RECORDS

on the

HISTORY

of

SOUTH PEMBROKESHIRE

Vol 1

1083 - 1389

Compiled by

B.H.J. HUGHES


Return to Research Topics

INTRODUCTION.

During my research into the history of the Castlemartin Hundred I have come upon much information contained in books of old Documents. These I have listed in date order. I would like to thank the University of Wales Press for permission to quote from Brut Y Tywysogyon or The Chronicle of the Princes Peniarth MS. 20 Version by Thomas Jones (1952).

Most of the rest of the documents listed are taken from The Calendar of Public Records relating to Pembrokeshire, Vol III Pembroke and Tenby by Henry Owen .Other sources are mentioned.

© B.H.J.Hughes 1993 (3nd Printing).

Notice: I, B.H.J. Hughes, hereby assert and give notice of my right under section 77 of the Copyright, designs and Patents Act 1988 to be identified as the author of this booklet.

Published by B.H.J. Hughes

PENNAR PUBLICATIONS.

ISBN 1 898687 00 5

British Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data.

A Catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library.


1066

Norman Conquest of England.

J. Graham Jones (The History of Wales) suggests that an agreement had been reached between William I and Rhys ap Tewdwr, King of Deheubarth, whereby Rhys should retain his authority in his own Kingdom.

1079 (1081)

Brut y Tyw (Rhys) p270; [also Ann. Camb., 28;]

William the Bastard, king of the Saxons, French and Welsh, came for prayer on a pilgrimage to Mynyv.

1087

William 1 died, William II (Rufus) succeeded.

1091

Norsemen from the Hebrides and the Isle of Man destroyed St Davids (for about the 6th time).

1093

Rhys ap Tewdwr killed near Brecon; whereupon the Norman Marcher Lords invaded and founded the marcher Lordships of Cardigan, Pembroke, Brecon and Glamorgan. They held the land they conquered by right of conquest and not as grants from the king, and so ruled them as if they were kings themselves.

1093

Arnulph de Montgomery landed in Milford Haven (he came of a family of whom the chronicler Henry de Huntingdon, says "their sins were enough to frighten the devils themselves") he fortified the site of Pembroke Castle - earthworks, stakes and turf fortress put in the care of Gerald de Windsor his chief follower.

1094

Roger de Montgomery (father of Arnulph) died. One of William I leading advisers; he had married Mabel of the family of Belleme, a name of notorious repute, and in 1066 had been appointed as regent to William I wife who had been left in nominal control of the duchy of Normandy. Made earl of Shrewsbury 1071.

1094

King William Rufus gave Earl Roger of Shrewsbury’s son, Arnulph de Montgomery, Dyfed. Arnulph made Pembroke the centre of his newly won territory.

1095 (1097)

(Brut y Tywysogyon (Rhys), p. 272; [also Ann. Camb., pp. 30-31].)

Geralt, the steward, to whom had been assigned the stewardship of the castle of Penuro, ravaged the boundaries of Mynyv.

1098

Benedictine cell founded at Pembroke by Arnulf de Montgomery subordinate to St Martin at Sees.

1098 August 17

(Cal. Doc. France, ed. Round pp. 237 8 No.666).

Notification that Arnulf of Montgomery, son of earl Roger, has given to the church of St Martin of Seez, for the souls of his father Roger and his brother Hugh who was slain that year, the church of St Nicholas at Pembroch, (ecclesiam santi Nicholai in eodem castro positam) a castle of his in Wales and twenty carucates of land, together with all that his men had given or should give to the abbey. He promised that he would give other land of his lying in England, sufficient to provide footgear for the brethren of the abbey. This gift he made that he might retain nothing for himself of all the rents and dues of the land, giving even his woods for the needs of the monks, namely for building, and firing and pannage, throughout his demesne. (Episcopal Acts relating to Welsh Dioceses 1066 1272 James Conway Davies Vol. 1).

1098

(Cal. Doc. France, ed Round pp. 238 No668).

Notification that Arnulf de Montgomery, son of earl Roger has given to the church of St Martin of Seez yearly ten pounds from England to be charged on the tithes of his churches and to be applied half to the footgear of the brethren at Seez, and half to the brethren at Pembroke on their buildings. Appended are the names of those who witnessed the kings confirmation: The king, Anselm, archbishop, Wilfrid, bishop, Arnulf, son of earl Roger, Robert fitz Hamon.

(Episcopal Acts relating to Welsh Dioceses 1066-1272 James Conway Davies Vol. 1).

1100c

(Cal. Doc. France, ed Round pp. 238 No667).

Memorandum of payments due to the abbey of St Martin of Seez and the brethren of Pembroke.... from the castle church, twenty shillings. (Episcopal Acts relating to Welsh Dioceses 1066 1272 James Conway Davies Vol. 1).

1100

William Rufus died, Henry 1 became King.

1102

Brut y Tywysogyon edited by Thomas Jones Cardiff 1952 71

"One Thousand and one hundred (actually 1102) was the year of Christ when there was treachery between Henry, king of England and Robert, earl of Shrewsbury, who was called de Belleme, and Arnulf his brother, who had come to Dyfed and had established the castle of Pembroke. And when the king heard that they were working treachery against him, he summoned them to find out the truth concerning that. But they sought pretexts to make an excuse, for they could not trust themselves to the king. And the king rejected their excuses after learning of their treachery. And when they knew that the king had learned of their treachery, and they dared not show themselves to him. They occupied their castles and fortified them, and summoned help to them from all sides and summoned to them the Britons who were under them, together with their leaders, namely the sons of Bleddyn ap Cynfyn, Cadwgan, Iorwerth and Maredudd. And they received them with honour, and gave them gifts and promised them many things and gladdened the land with liberty. And a second time they fortified their castles and encompassed them with ditches and strong walls and prepared provision and gathered together knights and gave them gifts. Robert occupied four castles, namely Arundel and Blyth and Bridgenorth and it was against Bridgenorth that the whole treachery had been aimed for he had built that without the king’s permission and Shrewsbury. Arnulf occupied Pembroke alone. And immediately after that they assembled hosts and summoned the Britons along with them. And while they were doing that Arnulf thought to make peace with the Irish and seek aid from them. And he sent messengers, that is, Gerald his officer, and many others, to Ireland and he asked for the daughter of king Muircertach for his wife. And that he obtained easily. The messengers came back joyful. King Muircertach sent his daughter and many armed ships along with her to the aid of his son in law. And for that reason the earls waxed proud against the king, without wishing for peace or agreement from him. And king Henry gradually gathered a host. And first he took the castle of Arundel. And thereupon through agreement and promises he gained possession of Blyth. And at last he came towards the castle of Bridgenorth, and with him a great host. And after surveying the castle from a distance he took council as to how he might capture the earl or subdue him or drive him out of the whole kingdom. And he resolved in council to send messengers to the Britons; and he summoned to him in particular Iorwerth ap Bleddyn, and he promised him more than he would obtain from the Earl. And he gave to Iorwerth freely, without rent or payment, that portion of Wales which was in the hands of those earls, for his lifetime so long as the king lived; that was Powys and Ceredigion and half of Dyfed, the other portion was in the hands of fitz Baldwin and Ystrad Tywi and Cydweli and Gower. And when Iorwerth ap Bleddyn was going towards the king’s castle, he sent his war band to plunder the territory of earl Robert. And the war band, cruelly and hostilely executing their lord’s behest, gathered vast plunder and ravaged the land and pillaged it; for the earl had before that ordered his men to take their flocks and herds and all their chattels into the land of the Britons, for he placed trust in them, not supposing that he would meet with opposition from them, not remembering the wrongs that the Britons had formerly suffered at the hands of Roger his father, and Hugh, his brother, and at the hands of their men, which was held in remembrance by the Britons.

Cadwgan, however, and Maredudd, sons of Bleddyn, were with the earl, knowing naught of that. And when the earl heard that, he despaired; and not trusting the help that was with him, because Iorwerth and his men had deserted him for Iorwerth was foremost of the Britons and the most powerful he sought a truce of the King to make peace with him or to leave the kingdom altogether.

Whilst they were about those things, Arnulf and his men had gone to meet his wedded wife and the fleet that had come to his aid. In the meantime Magnus, king of Germany (correctly of Norway), and with him a fleet, came a second time to Anglesey; and after felling for himself some trees for timber he returned to Man. And there he built three castles and a second time filled Man, which he had previously left desolate, with his men. And he asked for the daughter of Muircertach, king of Ireland, as a wife for his son. And he obtained her easily and gladly. And he set him up as king over that island. And there he stayed that winter.

And when earl Robert heard that, he sent messengers to him to beg help for himself; but he obtained none from him. And when the earl saw that he was beseiged on all sides, he asked permission of the king to leave the kingdom; and the king granted it to him. And then he left all that was his and sailed to Normandy. And then the king sent to Arnulf and commanded him to go after his brother and to leave the kingdom or else to come at the king’s will with his head in his lap. And when Arnulf heard that, he preferred to go after his brother than to submit to the king’s will, and he surrendered his castle to the king; and the king sent a garrison to keep it.

And after that, Iorwerth ap Bleddyn made peace with his brothers and he shared the territory with them. And after a short while he seized Maredudd, his brother, and imprisoned him in the king’s prison. And he made peace with Cadwgan, his brother, and gave him Ceredigion and a portion of Powys. And thereupon Iorwerth went to the king, thinking that he would have his promises from the king. But the king did not keep faith with him, but took from him Dyfed and the Castle and gave them to a certain knight called Saer. And Ystrad Tywi and Cydweli and Gower he gave to Hywel ap Goronwy.

1102-1135

The Crown (Henry I) held Pembroke Castle; for some of this time Gerald de Windsor was Custodian.

1107-1108

The Southern portion of Pembrokeshire was colonized by a large number of Flemings sent there by the King himself [Henry 1] "an industrious community of farmers, traders and woollen manufacturers". (An Introduction to the History of Wales - Williams).

1108

Cadwgan ap Blethyn held an Eistedfod at Cardigan - much talk about the beauty of Nesta.

1109

Owain eldest son of Cadwgan abducted Neste, wife of Gerald de Windsor, and her two sons. Henry I intervened and Nesta returned to Gerald.

1112 approx.

Gerald de Windsor died - Nesta married Stephen, Castellan of Cardigan.

1113

Bishop Wilfred wrote to the Abbot of Gloucester giving his monks leave to preach to the Flemings "who have suddenly appeared amongst us, and to lead them to the pastures of life, away from the pastures of sheep to which they now give all their care". (Introduction to West Wales Maxwell 1956).

1121 September 10

(Dugdale, Mon., IV p130; Cal Chart Rolls, Vol. IV 1327 48 p.214: Vol. II 1258 1300 p. 355).

Grant and confirmation by Robert, son of Martin, to the monks of Tiron and the monastery of St Mary at St Dogmael’s of the church of St Dogmaels and the land near it (boundaries given) and other lands, the island of Pyr, now called Calde, granted by his mother; pasture, the fishery of St Dogmaels etc. Though these grants were made at different times, at the ordination of the abbot, this donation was made on the day when the first abbot, Fuklchard, by name was enthroned in his seat by the Bernard, bishop of the church of St David’s, with the consent of that bishop, of whatsoever tithes he had given to that abbot, of produce, animals, sheep, foals, calves, and all cattle whatsoever of which tithe ought to be given as of cheese and butter, in Wales. These were given 4 Ides September in the presence of the Bishop Bernard, William abbot of Tiron, Richard son of Gilbert, Humphrey son of Gosmer, Stephen, the kings Dapifer, Alured of Bennervill, attested the charter. Witnesses; king Henry, queen Matilda, Robert Bernard, Matilda, Richard son of Gilbert, Stephen, Alured, Humphrey.

(Episcopal Acts relating to Welsh Dioceses 1066 1272 James Conway Davies Vol.1).

nd ( 1125 1128)

(Cal. Doc. France, ed Round No 670, p. 239.).

Confirmation by William, archbishop of Canterbury, and legate, to Bernard, bishop of St Davids, and all sons of the church. He testifies to having been told by the king at the council held at Westminster, that the earl Arnulf, gave the churches of all his land in Wales, and the tithes, and twenty carucates of land, and much else, and ten pounds worth of tithes from the churches he held in England, to the monks of St Martin, Seez, and that the king had given and granted the same to the brethren some of whom dwelt at Pembroc. For his part he grants and confirms this, as the king himself confirms it in his charter.

1128-1135 not dated

(MS. Fr 18953, f45).

Writ of protection by Henry I for the abbey of St Martin of Seez addressed to Odo, sheriff of Pembroq, for all their things in churches, lands, tithes, alms, and all other things, well, in peace and justly, as they held them at the time of Arnulph, and Wilfrid, bishop, and Walter of Gloucester.

1132 ?

Rhys ap Gruffydd youngest of the four sons and nephew of Neste born.

1135

Henry I died.

1135

King Stephen.

1138-1148

Gilbert fitzGilbert de Clare held Pembroke Castle.

1138

The practise of Clergy being allowed to marry in the Celtic Church finally ended.

1146?

Giraldus Cambrensis birthplace was Manorbier. Son of William de Barri and the lovely Angharad, daughter of Nest wife of Gerald de Windsor. Nest was the daughter of Rhys ap Tewdwr prince of South Wales.

[Manorbier was "alarmed" during his boyhood, probably when Tenby was taken by the Welsh in 1153. He is reputed to have taken refuge in the Church. He was the youngest of four Brothers, two of which took part in the Anglo Norman conquest of Ireland. He began his studies under guidance of his Uncle David fitz Gerald Bishop of St Davids then St Peters Abbey, Gloucester and finally Paris.]

1148-1176

Richard fitzGilbert held Pembroke Castle.

1150

Cadell ap Grufudd set upon while hunting near Saundersfoot by Flemish from Tenby and grievously hurt.

1153

Maredudd and Rhys the sons of Gruffydd ap Rhys crossed the sands from Amroth captured Tenby castle and slew its garrison.

1154

Stephen died.

1154

Henry II.

1157

Fleet sailed from Pembroke in support of Henry II against Owain Gwynedd at least two of Nest’s children sailed - fitz Henry killed, fitz Stephen badly injured.

1166

Cardigan Castle captured by Welsh - Robert fitz Stephen castellan.

1170

Invasion of Ireland from Pembroke.

1171

Henry II passed through area on his way to Ireland - Rhys ap Gruffydd officially recognised as ruler of Deheubarth.

1171

"Among the Norman French Knights of Pembrokeshire who took part in the descent upon Ireland was a Nangle or Angul. The family established itself near Navan in the county of Meath and founded a church at a place called Cannistown or Canonstown. One branch of these Irish "Angles" became known as Costellos." (Royal Commission on Ancient Monuments County of Pembroke).

1172

"Robert FitzBernard renders his account for eight ships to carry over twenty Knights and five attendants to Ireland 45s, and pay to seven pilots at Pembroke for 47 days £4 2s 3d, and fifty three seamen during the same period £15 2s 4d. Wages for five attendants for thirty days 56s 3d".

1172 April 16 17

(Benedict Gest Hen, Sec Vol. 1 p. 30).

Henry II embarked at Croch near Waterford on Easter Day 16th April, and landed at Milford near Penbroc, the same day about the ninth hour of that day. But because of the Easter Feast, the king would not that day enter the sea, but on the morrow he entered early, and that day landed near St Davids (David) in Wales in a place called (blank).

1172

Henry appointed Rhys ap Gruffydd as Justiciar of South Wales. Rhys made his principle residence Cardigan.

1172

Giraldus Cambrensis returned to Dyfed and successfully excecuted a minor mission for Archbishop Richard.

1173 6

Gilbert and Jocelyn of Angle rewarded for their service in Ireland with estates in Meath, Ireland Gilbert with what later became known as the Barony of Morgallion Jocelyn with Ardhronan and Naven.

(The History of Pembrokeshire Rev. James Phillips 1909).

nd (1174 1175)

(Gir. Camb, De Rebus (R.S.), Vol. I p. 24).

Gerald de Barri, seeing that almost throughout the diocese of St Davids and especially in the region of Demetia and Keretia, by the lack of care of the prelates, neither tithes of wool nor cheese were given, went to Canterbury to which at that time, the church of St Davids, like the whole of Wales, was subject to provincial law, and showed these defaults to archbishop Richard, then primate of all England and legate, who sent him back to Wales as his legate, to amend these irregularities and others, which he should find there. The archbishop in his letters warned and enjoined all for the remission of sins, that those who had not formerly given these tithes, should give them. To those who were willing to give at his monition, he relaxed a third part of the penance enjoined, but the obstinate and those who refused to give, he ordered should be coerced strictly by ecclesiastical censure. All the Welsh forthwith obeyed these monitions and agreed to give those tithes, as did all others in the whole country, except the Flemings of Ros, and their accomplices, who would have been put under interdict for a long period, had not the sentence imposed been relaxed by the archbishop at the instance of Henry II to whom they went.

1174 5 not dated

(Gir. Camb. De Rebus (RS) Vol.1 pp. 25).

William Karquit, sheriff of the province (provincia) ordered his officers and apparitors to take eight yoke of oxen belonging to the priory of Penbroc, where Gerald de Barri was fulfilling his legation, and drive them to the castle. When required for the third time to restore the same, he utterly refused and even promised worse, Gerald sent word to him that unless he restored the oxen he would be placed immediately under sentence of excommunication, to which he replied that he would not dare to excommunicate the king’s constable in his own castle. Gerald replied that when the sheriff heard all the bells of the whole monastery rung at triple intervals then he would know without doubt that he was being excommunicated. immediately the messengers had returned, by authority of his legation, with candles lit, he solemnly gave the sentence of excommunication on him, in the presence of the monks of that place, and many of the clergy of the country, and likewise caused all the bells to be sounded together, as was customary, to confirm the sentence or rather to announce the fact. On the morrow, the robber came to the castle of Lanwadein, before David , the diocesan bishop, and Gerald and his colleague, Master Michael, whom the archbishop had attached to him, who had gone there, restitution having been made and satisfaction given, when he was beaten with rods, he was to be absolved.

(Episcopal Acts relating to Welsh Dioceses 1066 1272 James Conway Davies Vol. 1).

1175

Giraldus Cambrensis was made archdeacon of Brechnock plus additional holding at Mathry, Llanwnda, & Tenby.

nd 1175 1176

(Gir. Camb. De Rebus (R.S.) Vol. 1 p. 28).

Letters from Richard, archbishop of Canturbury, to David, bishop of St Davids, at the instance of Gerald, archdeacon of Brecon, stating that he had relaxed only those dwelling in the cantref of Ros, from the interdict for non payment of tithes of wool and cheese and them only for a time, at the instance of the king, and that he would strictly include in his previous interdict all others who refuse to pay those tithes.

(Episcopal Acts relating to Welsh Diocess 1066 1272 James Conway Davies Vol. 1).

nd 1175 1176

(Ger. Camb. De Rebus (R.S) Vol. 1 p. 28).

The inhabitants of the cantref of Dugledu and those of Angle were recalled under the sentence of interdict. The latter, though dwelling in the province (provincia) of Penbroc, were Flemings, and like those of Ros and Dugledu had spent money to obtain the immunity, which they likewise wished to enjoy

1175-6 not dated

(Ger. Camb. De Rebus (R.S) Vol. 1 p. 29).

The parishioners of Angle, which was a church of Gerald, archdeacon of Brecon, and which was under interdict, and its parishioners excommunicated on account of their rebellion, sought the grace of absolution, with the leave and blessing of David the bishop of St David, with whom he was staying at Kerreu, Gerald set out to grant it.

1176-1189

Henry II held Pembroke Castle (Minority)

(Gilbert fitz Richard 1176 - 1185; Isabel 1185 - 1189).

1176

Giraldus Cambrensis hoped to succeed his Uncle as Bishop of St David’s but was disappointed.

1183

Giraldus Cambrensis administrator of the See of St Davids visited Ireland. Published "The Topography of Ireland".

1187

Maelgwn ap Rhys laid waste Tenby.

1188

Giraldus Cambrensis Tour of Wales with Archbishop Baldwin.

1189

Henry II died.

1189

Richard I.

1189-1219

William Marshal held Pembroke Castle.

1191

Giraldus Cambrensis published his "Itinerary through Wales".

1193

A Flemish army recaptured Wiston Castle from the Welsh.

1194

Giraldus Cambrensis published his "Description of Wales".

1196

Giraldus Cambrensis left King’s service to study Theology at Lincoln.

1197

Rhys ap Gruffydd died age 65 buried at St Davids.

1198

Giraldus Cambrensis resigned the Office of Archdeacon devoted his remaining years to study.

1199

Richard I died.

1199

King John.

1199 16th July Seez

(Charter Roll 1 John, m 33 (Rec Com Cal p3).

Among divers premises granted to the Knights Templars is included a mill near the bridge of the Castle of Pembroke on the seaside. (unum molendinium ad pontem castelli de Pembroc super brachium maris).

1200 approx

(According to J. Conway Davies - Journal of the Historical Society of Wales Vol 2 1950 p54).

The locations in Pembrokeshire mentioned by Giraldus in his various works are:

Castles: -

Carew

Manorbier

Pembroke

Tenby

Monasteries: -

Pembroke, Priory of St Nicholas, a cell of St Martin of Seez, Benedictine

Churches: -

Angle

Burton

Carew

Lamphey

Llanstadwell

Manorbier

Pembroke

Stackpole

Tenby

Upton.

1202 July August

(Gir. Camb. De Jure (R.S.) Vol III p 227).

Nicholas Avenel, sheriff of Pembrok, and William fitz Martin despoil archdeacon Gerald’s prebend of Martru (Philip, chaplain), and his church of Lanwundaf (Aidan, chaplain), both within the churchyards and without, taking captive and imprisoning men and women and compelling them to pay heavy ransom.

nd 1204 1214

(From an inspeximus 5 Edward III, Cal. Pat. Rolls 1330 1334 p. 67 Dugdale, Mon., Vol. IV p. 321)

Grant by William Marshall, earl of Pembroke, for the souls of himself, Isabella , his wife, and all his ancestors and heirs, to the church of St John the Evangelist and St Nicholas the Confessor, of Pembroch, and the monks there of the tithes of his vills of Penbroke, Tynbeh, and Castle Martin, in free alms. Witnesses: Geoffrey, bishop of St David’s Robert, son of Richard, Geoffrey son of Robert, Ralph Bluet, Nicholas Avenel

nd 1205 10

(Gir. Camb. De Rebus (RS) Vol3 pp. 353-4).

When the church of Thunebech was vacant, Geoffrey, bishop of St David’s, immediately solicited it from Philip, the prior of Pembroch, several times, urging earnestly and by all means, that he should confer that church on a certain clerk of his, that thereby he could use those fish as he wished. When the prior replied to him that he was bound under a firm guarantee to confer his first vacant parish in Master Gerald, the bishop promised, under certain security, that he would make himself responsible for the whole parish and charge of expenses if Gerald should reclaim that church; moreover, he undertook, under a firm bond, that he would give the half part of all the tithes of fish of that church, which there abounded, to the prior as long as he lived and to the monks dwelling there with him, to their own use.

1207 approx

Gilbert of Angle was granted a large tract in co Meath Ireland lost it by rebellion, was pardoned 1207 and granted lands in Connaught

(Old Pembrokeshire families Henry Owen p. 85) his descendants are the Costello’s. Jocelin, his brother(?) was granted Navan in Meath (I.P.M., Edward II no 65E).

1210

King John visited Pembroke and summoned the men of South Pembrokeshire to meet him at Holy Cross, by the East Gate of the town, near a hospital called Marlan’s Chapel, (King’s Bridge was reputedly named after this visit.)

1212 May 21 Westminster

(Close Roll 14 John m6 (Rec. Com. Cal p. 92b)).

Order to Fauke de Breaute, the King’s bailiff of Glamorgan, to restore to William de Carrio the house and lands which he held when the king last came to Pembroke to cross over into Ireland.

1215 January 11

(Cal. Rot. Pat., 1201 16 p. 126).

Letters patent of king John to the knights, free tenants and all others of the bishopric of St Davids, informing them that he had committed the custody of the bishopric, with all its appurtenances to W(illiam) Marshal, earl of Pembroke, during pleasure. Mandate to be intendant and respondent.

1216

John died.

1216

Henry III.

1219

William Marshal died; he left to the monks of Pembroke, the title of Pembroke mill, Causey Mill Tenby and King’s Mill at Castlemartin. He was buried in the Temple Church London.

1219-1231

William Marshal (son of William Marshal) held Pembroke Castle he was buried (as was his father) in the Temple Church London.

1220

William Marshal the 2nd Earl of Pembroke paid £100 to Llywelyn ab Iorwerth to prevent the ravage of Pembroke.

1220 October 5 Westminster

(Patent Roll 4 Henry III (Cal p 255)).

Order to the knights and free tenants of the county of Pembroke, to be intendent to William Marshal in the same manner as before the raid made by Llewelyn, the Prince of North Wales.

1223

Giraldus Cambrensis died.

1231

Richard Marshal inherited as Earl of Pembroke. He was in ill favour at court and he was refused entrance to Pembroke Castle but beseiged it and after a short time took it. He was murdered in Ireland in 1234 at, it is said, Henry’s instigation.

1231 April 15 Westminster

(Patent Roll 15 Henry III, m.3 (Cal., p 430)).

Safe conduct to Robert Audeley sent on the king’s business to the constabularium of Pembroke.

1231 June 10 Westminster

(Patent Rolls 15 Henry III, m.2 (Cal p. 437)).

Mandate to Henry "Crasso", constable of Pembroke and Richard "de Rupe", constable of Tenby, ordering them to deliver up their respective castles with their appurtenances to John Marshall and Aumaric of St Amand, to whom the king has granted their custody.

1234

Gilbert Marshal inherited as Earl of Pembroke, married Joan daughter of King John. He died in a tourneyment accident in 1241 at Hereford and is also buried in the Temple Church.

1241

Walter Marshal succeeded as Earl of Pembroke, he died at Goodrich Castle in 1245.

1241 July 1 Clarendon

(Patent Rolls 25 Henry III, m.6 (Cal p. 254)).

Mandate to all constables and bailiffs late of G. Marshal, earl of Pembroke, in Ireland, because the earl is dead, to deliver forthwith all his castles and lands. ...... The like to the constable of Pembroc, Kaermeredin, Cardigan and Kilgaran, committed to the custody of Hubert Huse.

1245

Anselm Marshal succeeded as Earl of Pembroke but died after 11 days. He was the last of the sons of William Marchal & Isabel, daughter of Strongbow and Eva; thus the curse of Bishop of Ferns in Ireland was fulfilled. William’s sons all died childless. His possessions were divided among his six daughters and Joan who had married Warine de Munchensy inherited Pembroke. (Their son, also Warine, died at the seige of Drwsllyn Castle in the battle against Rhys ap Meredydd when he was buried alive in a mine.)

1245 December 3 Windsor

(Patent Roll 30 Henry III, m 9 (Cal p. 468)).

Mandate to Nicholas de Molis touching the castles of Pembrok and Tinbye.

1246 January 16 Westminster

(Patent Roll 30 Henry III, m 8 (Cal p. 470)).

Appointment during pleasure, of Robert Waleraund to custody of all the lands and castles late of W. Marshal, earl of Pembroke, in West Wales; with mandate to Gilbert del Val to deliver them to him. Writ de intendendo to the tenants. Mandate to the constables of the castles of Tymbeye and Pembroke to deliver to him.

1246 July 21 Oxford

(Patent Roll 30 Henry III, m2 (Cal p.484)).

Mandate to Robert Waleraund to allow the heirs of Walter Marshal earl of Pembroke, to have seisin of the earl’s lands in Pembrokeshire, and the castle of Pembrok among other castles.

1247 August 7 Northampton

(Patent Roll 31 Henry III m 3 (Cal, p. 506)).

Mandate to Robert Waleraund to deliver to William de Valance, or his messenger bearing the king’s letters, the castle of Pembrok and the lands assigned to him of the lands late of W. Marshal, earl of Pembroke, with the issues since the death of the said John.

1247 1296

William de Valence held Pembroke Castle.

1247

Richard de Angulo held of the Earl a Knights fee at Angle.

1256 March 18

(Cal Pap. Reg., Vol 1 1198-1304 p. 329).

Papal indult to William, rector of Stackepol Elidir, in the diocese of St Davids, whose value hardly exceeds ten pounds, to hold an additional benefice, with care of souls.

1260 March 3

(Rec. Church in Wales, Stat. Bk. St David’s pp. 50-1).

Notification by Richard, bishop of St Davids that the prior and monks of St Nicholas Pembroch, with the consent of the abbot and convent of Seez have renounced to his hands and to his ordinance the right of patronage in the churches of St Wynnoc and Kylkemeran which belonged absolutely to that priory, renouncing all appeals thereon. The bishop with the consent of his chapter, has ordained concerning the said churches that the prior and monks of St Nicholas Pembroch, shall obtain and possess for ever to convert to their own use the church of Kylkemeran, with its profits, provided that the said church shall not be deprived of its divine offices. He ordains also that the canons residential of the church of St Davids shall obtain and possess for ever for their own use and maintenance the church of St Wynoc, with its profits, after the cession or death of Master William de Gogh, rector of the said Church. The prior and monks shall continue to receive the pension of one mark from the canons, which they used to receive, reserving to the bishop and his successors power to confer the vicarage when vacant. The collations and donations of the tithes and pensions of the churches, except the above mentioned pension which they have canonically in the bishopric of St Davids by the collations of the bishop’s predecessors, with the consent of the patrons, the prior and monks shall possess as justly canonically and peacefully as in time past, by authority of the ordinary, saving in all things episcopal and archdiaconal rights in the said church.

Sealed by the bishop and his chapter at Lantefey, Wednesday after St David, 1259.

(Episcopal Acts relating to Welsh dioceses 1066 1272 James Conway Davies Vol1).

1264

Warine de Munchensy was beaten at the Battle of Lewes and went into exile. Pembroke castle and its estates were handed over to the Earl of Gloucester.

1264 6 June St Paul’s London

(Patent Roll 48 Henry III pt1 m.12 (Cal p322)).

Commitment during pleasure to Gilbert de Clare, earl of Gloucester and Hereford, of the castle of Pembroke and all the lands in the county of Pembroke of William de Valancia, with wardships, farms and other appurtenances, to be kept by the constable of the said castle and other bailiffs of the said William, so that the earl receive the issues by view of the said bailiffs and put them in a safe place until further order, and answer for them at the king’s mandate.

1265 10 May Hereford

(Patent Roll, 49 Henry III, m.16 (Cal., pp. 423-4)).

Whereas John de Warenna and William de Valencia with armed men to the number of about a hundred and twenty men as well horse as foot, have now landed in the parts of Pembroke and keep themselves there, and many adversaries of the king and the realm from beyond seas, if they knew of their landing which has been made without the king’s knowledge and will, as their leaving the realm was made peacefully and without impediment, would prepare to enter the realm with more will and spirit, to disturb the peace, or to give aid to the said John and William if they proposed to grieve the realm; the king has commanded the barons and bailiffs of the ports to keep their shore manfully and strongly against the invasion of anyone; and whereas the king has appointed Brian de Guiz as keeper of the parts of Somerset and Dorset, he commands all men of those counties to be of counsel and aid to the said Brian, in the keeping of the peace and especially in the defence of the maritime parts there; and if any are disobedient or remiss in executing the kings mandates, the king will betake him forthwith to their persons and goods, notwithstanding any liberty, as against those who care not whether the kings and realm be given over to confusion and disherison. Mandate to the said Brian to be keeper of the peace of the counties accordingly; and the king has commanded the sheriff to be of aid and counsel to him. And as false rumours are being spread of the king, whereby trouble may be again stirred in the realm, the king has written to the said sheriff in the form of these presents, and if the sheriff is lax, the said Brian is to urge him to be diligent for the love of the king and the common utility of the realm.

1272

Henry III died.

1272

Edward 1.

1274

William of Valance Earl of Pembroke.

1278 January 10 The Tower

(Welsh Roll, 10 Edward I, m. 10d (Cal p. 247)).

Appointment of Payn de Cadurcis and Master Henry de Brayt to hear and determine certain pleas and suits in West Wales. The king has ordered, among others, the bailiffs of William de Valencia, his uncle at Pembrok, the bailiffs of Nicholas, son of Martin at Cammays, the bailiffs of the bishop of St Davids of west Wales, the bailiffs of Guy de Brienne and Thomas de la Roche to cause to come before Payne and Henry so many and such men by whom the truth in the premises may best be known.

1278

Stephen de Angulo who with his son and heir Philip de Angulo granted various lands and deminines in and around Angle together with "wreck of the Sea" to Robert de Shirburn,with remainder in default of male issue to Robert’s daughter, Joan, wife of Robert de Castro, with remainder to the right heirs of Robert de Shirburn.

(Episcopal Acts relating to Welsh dioceses 1066 1272 James Conway Davies Vol. 1).

1282 April 7 Devizes

(Welsh Roll 10 Edward I, m, 10d (Cal. P. 247)).

Order to William de Valancia and to his bailiffs of Pembrok, Roger de Martuo Mari and his bailiffs of Sencer, William son of Martin and his bailiffs of Kameys, and others, not to have any communication with the Welsh rebels.

1283

Edward I created Pembroke a County Palatine [abolished by

Henry VIII].

1284

Although Edward I drew up the Statute of Wales which laid down that Welsh Common Law, language and customs would be respected and which did not seek to put an end to "gravelkind" the welsh system of divided inheritance. But it did add the provision that illegitimate sons could not be successors, that lawful widows were to be entitled to a dower, and that women could not succeed when there was no male heir.

PEMBROKE was to continue as a County Palatine owing direct allegiance to the crown where the earls were undisputed rulers owing no more than feudal loyalty to the king - they were allowed to administer their own justice, raise revenues according to their own determination and make and enforce whatever laws they wished. (Princes and People John Miles).

1287 July 23 Hereford

(Welsh Roll 15 Edward I, m. 9d (Cal. p. 314)).

Order to the bailiffs of William de Valencia, at Pembrok, to have all the posse of their lord of the bailiwick, both horsemen and footmen, ready at Kermerdyn, well equipped with suitable arms against the coming thither of the earl of Cornwall.

The like to the Bishop of St David’s or to his steward.

1289 November 16 Lampader

(Patent Roll 12 Edward I, m. 1d (Cal p145)).

Commissions of oyer and terniner to Ralph de Hengham, Nicholas de Stapleton, William de Burneton, and Master Thomas de Sudington, touching the dissensions between William de Valence, the king’s uncle, and his bailiffs of Pembrock and the commonalty of Haverford, which have been often laid before the council by the burgesses without any amends.

1290 November 6 Clipston

(Charter Roll 18, Edward 1, m. 1 (Cal. p. 373)).

Inspeximus and confirmation of a charter, whereby Nicholas, son of Martin, inspected and confirmed a charter whereby William de Kantiton, son and heir of Jordan de Kantiton, gave in frank almoin to the church of SS. Mary and Dogmael, and the monks there all his land of Fisgard on each side of the water of Gweun; witnesses: Sir William de Bolevill, steward of Pembrok, Tancard de Hospit’ then sheriff, Robert then constable. .. de Wydewrthe, Phillip de Stackpol, John de Casto Sancti Martine, John de Busseto, knights, Robert de Mortuo Mari, Gilbert de. ... son of Maurice, Walter Malenfaunt, Herbert de Scorlagg, John de Castro; witnesses to the charter of Nicholas son of Martin, Sir Stephen de Edesworth, steward of (Pembroke) .... Robert de Valle, William de Caumvill, John de Castro Martini, Robert Martyn, Gilbert de Rupe, knights, John de Scyrebur .... Robert Martyn of Kemmeys, Eynon son of William, Lewelin Goch, constable of Kemmeys.

1290 6th November

John de Scyrebur who witnessed the confirmation of a Charter by which Fishguard was given to the monks of St Dogmael’s - had a son Robert who was Sheriff of Pembroke in 1298.

1291

(ROT PARL. Vol. 1, pp. 68-9).

William de Valance v. the King’s Bailiff’s touching jurisdictions within the Barony of Kemmeys.

William Martin before the King and his Council at Clypstone, presented that William de Valance wrongfully, forcibly, entered his lands within the Barony of Kemeys and compelled him and his men of the said Barony to do suit at his county of Pembroke, and sought the king’s pleasure. William de Valance appeared and said that in the full county court of Pembroke, it was adjudged that the said William Martyn, on account of several defaults in making suits which he aught to make to the county should be compelled to come to the said county court to answer divers men who had plaints against him. On behalf of the Queen Consort, her bailiffs submitted that all Crown pleas and all pleas pleadable before the Sheriff or Steward arising within the Barony of Kemmeys, pertained to her court of Haverford. William de Valence asserted that when Walter Marshal’s inheritance was partitioned among his heirs, one of whom was Joan his wife, Joan was given all the profits, issues, and amercements of the Crown pleas and of all other pleas whatsoever pleadable before the Sheriff, both within the aforesaid Barony of Kemmeys and elsewhere within the precincts of the county of Pembroke; the which profits etc. ever afterwards were received by the bailiffs and ministers of this county of Pembroke, until two parts of the Barony of Haverford came into the hands of the Queen, whose bailiffs drew (attraxerunt) the men of the Barony of Kemneys to come to her court of Haverford to the manifest disinherison of the said Joan. William sought remedy in this behalf, and the case was ajourned to the morrow of Epiphany, meanwhile search to be made among the Rolls, etc. Judgement was given in favour of William de Valance, saving to the Crown all homages &c, due by reason of all lands in the said barony.

1296

William de Valance died. His son Aymer inherited; he was an absentee from Pembroke.

1296 1324

Aymer de Valence held Pembroke Castle.

1296 November 15 Bury St Edmunds.

(Close Roll 25 Edward 1,m.24 (Cal. p. 3)).

Land and rent of the yearly value of £14 5s 8d in co. Pembroke assigned to Joan, late the wife of William de Valence, as part of her dower, and order to the escheator beyond Trent not to intermeddle wherewith.

1298

(Sloane Charter XXXII. 14 (British Museum)).

Know all, present and future, that I, Philip de Angulo, have given, granted, and by this my present Charter confirmed to William de Rupe(Roch) all my land which I have in tenement of Angle, with appurtenances, together with the dowry of my mother, Isabel, when it shall occur, and a certain Island called Sepinilond ( Sheep island) and all my rents of Angle, as well of a windmill as of all my men, with suit of Court and services of the same, without any retention therefrom to me or my heirs. To have and to hold the aforesaid land, with the aforesaid rents, which is aforesaid, with the appurtenances, to the said William and his heirs or assigns from the lord in chief of the fee according to measurement, and as it is assigned to the said William by ancient fixed bounds and limits, freely, quietly, in peace, hereditarily, for ever; in meadows, marshes, ways, paths, waters, pastures, turbaries, commons, wreck, in all easements, save only in forinsic (foreign) service in all things the lord in chief of the fee as is due therefrom and customary. But I, the aforesaid Philip, and my heirs and assigns, bind ourselves to warrant and acquit and defend forever against all men, the aforesaid land and ppurtenances, together with the aforesaid rents, to the said William and his heirs and assigns. And that this my gift and grant, and confirmation of my present Charter , may remain ratified and established in the future, I have strengthened this present deed with the impression of my seal.

Witnesses:

John de Nenborth (Narberth) Seneschal (Steward of Pembroke)

Robert de Shyrburn Sheriff (Angle)

Sir Nicholas de Karren (Warren)

Sir Gilbert de Rupe (Roch)

Sir Richard de Stakepol

Sir John de Bary (Manorbier)

Henry son of Henry (Fitzhenry)

David de Rupe (Roch)

David Wyriot (Orielton)

David Malesent (Malefant, Upton)

William de Creppings

John de Castro

and many others, given at Angle on the Feast of the Purification of the Blessed Virgin in the year of Our Lord, 1298.

1301 January 6 Northamton

(Inq. A.O.D. file 34 No 12).

Writ, Northampton, 6 January, 1301, to John de Havering, Justice of Wales.

Inquisitions, Castle Ely, Saturday next after Feast of the Conversion of St Paul, 29 Edward I. Jurors: John Laundry, William de Ffilebeche, Robert de Malros, Walter Kanan, Stephen Baret, Geoffrey Randulf, Ieuan ap Bath, Henry Vaghan, John Peltwy, Arnold of St Bride’s, Philip of St Clears, Meredith ap Traharn. John de Bary to grant a certain perch of land in Pennally with the advowson of the church of the vill in the county of Pembroke, to the prioress and convent of Aconbury.

1303 February 20 Hertford

(Patent Roll, 31 Edward 1,m.35 (Cal p. 117)).

Grant to the men of Joan de Valencia, countess of Pembroke, of the liberty of Pembroke, that their attending to prevent delay, an inquisition which has been summoned before John de Havering and Walter Hakelut, justices at Kermerdyn, between .... and William de Brewosa touching certain liberties which the latter says he has in those parts, shall not be to their prejudice or drawn into a precedent; as they assert that their attendance without their liberty is to their prejudice.

1306 January 24 Bindon

(Patent Roll 34 Edward I, m. 36 (Cal. p. 413)).

Grant to the men of Joan de Valencia, countess of Pembroke, of the liberty of Pembroke, that their coming without their liberty before William Inge, Walter de Gloucester and Walter de Pederton, justices appointed to take an inquisition at Sweyneseye between the king and William de Brewosa, touching certain liberties which the later says he holds in those parts, shall not be to their prejudice nor drawn into a precedent. At another time a like letter was sealed of the inquisition taken in such case.

1307

Edward I died.

1307

Edward II.

1307 July 26

(Inq. Post Mortem C., Edward II File 6(2)).

(Lands,etc of Guy de Brian)

m.1 Writ to the Justice of West Wales, dated 26 July 1 Edward II.

m.2 Carmarthen.

m.3 Pembroke. Inq. dated 26 Aug., 1 Edward II taken before Walter

de pederton, Justice of West Wales, at Carmarthen. Jurors: Geoffrey de Huscard; John Calive, Robert Baglas, William filebech, William de......, de Schireburn, Walter Hugh, Henry Cadel, Thomas Barry, Richard de Hok, John Ouweyn, John, the smith.

Extent. Guy de Bryan held one barony of the March, called the Barony of Castle Walwain (containing nine knight’s fees and three carucates of land), in chief of the earl of Gloucester, by homage and service of 1 1/3 knight’s fee and doing suit from month to month at the county court of Pembroke, which barony is in the king’s hands by reason of the minority of Gilbert de Clare, son and heir of Sir Gilbert late Earl of Gloucester. At Castle Walwain there is no habitable house, but there is a certain garden worth 2s. yearly; 40a. of arable land in demesne worth 6s 8d yearly ie., 2d per acre; 6a meadow worth 6s yearly ie., 12d per acre; a certain several pasture worth 20s yearly; and three acres of [under] wood worth 2s yearly; one watermill 40s yearly, and another water mill at Malros worth 20s yearly; 27 tenants who hold severally (particulariter) 10 carucates of land more or less both at the lord’s will and the will of the said tenants, and pay yearly £9 3s 4d at Xmas and the Nativity of S John the Baptist in equal sums and 24 capons value 2s at the same terms; also 14 tenants of like status who hold severally (particulariter) about 5(?) carucates of land,paying a rent of 100s 10 1/2d and 16 capons, value 16d at Easter and Michaelmas in equal portions. At Benton, one curtilage (value 2s yearly). Thomas de la Roche holds one knight’s fee in Borton, containing 10 carucates of land by homage and service of one knight, and doing suit to the court at Castle Walwain every fortnight The heirs of Robert de la Vale hold one knight’s fee at Ladale (containing 10 carucates) and one half knight’s fee in Waltone (containing 5 carucates) by homage and service of 1½ knight’s fee, and doing suit of court as above.

Clement Brown holds one knight’s fee in Huscard by homage and service of one knight and half yearly rent at Michaelmas, and doing suit of court as above. Walter Hugh holds 9 carucates in Rypperystone, Williameystone, Langeberch, and Noleshock, by homage and knight’s service in proportion to the amount of land held, and doing suit of court as above. Harold de Hariandystone holds half knight’s fee in Harauldystone, containing five carucates, by homage and service of half knight’s fee and doing suit as above. Richard de Sancta Brigida holds half knight’s fee in St Bride’s and in Hethburch, containing 5 carucates by homage and service of half knight’s fee and doing suit as above; whereof John the smith holds one carucate, paying 10d at Xmas and the Nativity of St John the Baptist, to the said Guy for all services John......holds 2 2/3 carucates of land in Herbraundystone by homage and yearly rent of 17s 9 1/2d payable at the Nativity of St John the Baptist, and by the service one third part of one bowman and doing suit of court as above.

Philip Wydok holds one carucate of land by homage and yearly rent of 26s 8d, payable at Easter and Michaelmas in equal sums, and by the service of a moiety of a bowman, and doing suit of court as above. John le ... holds half carucates in Herbraundystone by homage and yearly rent of 8s 10 1/2d payable at Easter and Michaelmas for all services. Heirs ... Hi hold 1 ½ carucates by homage abd service of one bowman for all services. Henry Cadel holds half carucate of land in Colystone by homage, and doing three attendances yearly at the said court for all service Robert de Hulle holds half carucate there by like service John Hiye(?) holds one carucate in La More by homage, and yearly rent of 2s at Xmas and the Nativity of St John the Baptist, and by service of a moiety of a bowman and suit of court as above. Robert de Hounteborch holds 2 ½ carucates in Hounteborch by homage, and yearly rent of 5s 4d at Xmas and Navity of St John the Baptist, and by the service of a moiety of a bowman, and doing suit of court as above. Gilbert de Musselwick holds two carucates in Muskelwik by homage and by the service of a moiety of a bowman, and doing suit of court as above.

Richard [Ho]k] holds three carucates in Hok’ and St Bride’s by homage, and yearly rent of 1d at Easter, and by service of a moiety of a bowman, doing suit of court as above. Robert de Malros holds one carucate in Little Malros by homage, by service of a moiety of a bowman, and doing suit as above. Robert Baglas holds half carucate in Swarte[bourch] [by homage] and by doing suit of court as above.

John the smith (Faber) holds half carucate by homage, and yearly rent of 1d at Michaelmas and doing suit as above. Guy de Lansreny holds half carucate in Swartebourche by homage and doing suit of court as above.

The pleas and perquisites of the courts there are worth yearly 13s 4d

Sum £23 10s.

Guy, his son, aged 23, is his next heir.

1307

Countess Joan, wife of William de Valance died.

1307 September 20

(Inq. Post Mortem, C Edward II File 4(1) (Cal p 21a)).

Lands etc of Joan de Valencia, Countess of Pembroke.

m.1 Writ 20 Sept 1307

m.2 The Marches of Wales, Castle Godrich. Inq. Thursday after St Denis 1 Edward II.

m.3 The Marches of Wales. Inq. Friday after St Luke, 1 Edward II

Teneb[er]ey (sic) Jurors: John Jacob, William Godwyn, Adam Wader, Walter Horwod, Stephen clericus John de Esse, Wigard le Taylur, Walter Peneres, Walter Hun, John Turner, John Felagh, David Reymund.

Extent; 20a. foreign land paying 20s yearly in equal sums at Michaelmas and Easter; 241 burgages, paying £12 12d. do.; 1a meadow, worth 2s yearly, payable at Michaelmas; 2 mills, one water mill and one wind mill, worth 66s 8d yearly, payable in equal sums, etc., as above; 6 "burgesses by the wind" (adventicii burgenses), paying 6s yearly, in equal sums, etc. prise of beer in the town, worth yearly 20s; tolls worth yearly 20s; perquisites of the Courts, worth yearly 20s.

Aymer, her son, aged 36 and more, is her next heir.

m.4 The Marches of Wales. Inq., Thursday after St Luke, 1 Edward

II. Pembroke. Jurors: Richard de Stakepol kt., David de la Roche, Stephen Perrot, Alexander Robelin, Robert Vacchan, William de Cripping, Walter berth, David de Villa Pattricii, Benedict de Horston, John Longe, John Coci, Ralph Benger.

Extent: The castle of Pembroke which is worth nothing yearly (quia custuosum); 2 carucates of land, each carucate worth yearly 66s 8d; 200 burgages worth £10 yearly, half payable at Easter, and the other half at Michaelmas; 3 water mills paying £13 6s 8d yearly at the aforesaid times; the pleas and perquisites together with the tolls are worth 6s 8d yearly; the piscaries are worth 6s 8d yearly; the prise of beer 60s. do.; 7a. of meadow worth 14s yearly; the rent of Karreu for the ward of the castle of Pembroke, 28s at Michaelmas; rent of Stackpole 18s payable in equal sums at the aforementioned times; do Kylvegy, 4s; Costeyniston 8s; Gilcop 4s; Gonedon 4s; Opeton 4s; Seynt Syrone,5s; Manynerbir, 17s; Mynwere 4s; Esse 1d. all payable at the aforesaid two terms; the pleas and perquisites of the "County" of Pembroke are worth yearly £6 13s 4d; pleas and perquisites of the pleas of Castle Gate (Cur’ Porte Castri), 100s yearly; perquisites of the pleas of obligation, 13s 4d yearly.

Castle Martin 2 Carucates of land each worth 50s yearly; 12a of meadow each acre 18d yearly; 60a pasture worth 30s yearly; turbary, worth 20s yearly; 1 water mill, paying £7 yearly at the two terms aforesaid; rent of 2 free tenants 14s payable at four terms, namely All Saints, the Purification, Whitsuntide, and St Peter ad Vincula; the rent of 60 gable tenants (gabularii) and 12 cottars, £80 8s 1d payable at the aforesaid four terms; pleas and perquisities there are worth 20s yearly.

St Fflorence 2 carucates of land, worth £4; rent of 39 gable tenants and 10 chensers, £30, half payable at Easter and half at Michaelmas; 1 acre 1 rood of meadow worth 2s 6d yearly; pleas and perquisites 6s 8d. yearly

Coyt traht 60a. "terre firc", each acre worth 4d. yearly; rent of 2 free tenants, 23s 4d. payable half at Easter and half at Michaelmas; virgavel rent ( pro irgravil) 6s 8d yearly at the said terms; pleas and perquisites yearly 6s 8d; oannage (ponag’) 3s yearly.

Aymer, etc., is next heir.

1309 March 12 Stratford

(Close Roll. 2 Edward II, m. 12 (Cal p. 94)).

To Roger de Mortuo, Justice of Wales: Order to deliver to John de Hastinges all the lands in Amgeyt and Pulmok, and a third of the lands in St Clare in West Wales, which he lately granted as appears by inquisition to Rhys (Reso) ap Mereduk and Ada his wife, to hold to them and the heirs of their bodies so that if they died without an heir of the body, the lands aforesaid should revert to the said John by form of a gift; which lands are held in chief by knight service,and were taken into the late king’s hands upon the death of the said Ada.

1315 December 1

(Clipstone Patent Roll, 9 Edward, pt 1, m.15 (Cal, pp. 370)).

Mandate to Payn de Turbeville (the appointed keeper during pleasure, of the castles and late of Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester and Hereford). to take into the king’s hands all knight’s fees in the county of Pembroke, and to take fealty of the tenants of those fees in the king’s name, and to inform the king thereof. Mandate also to cause the castles to be kept safe and to be furnished with dead stock and men allowance to be made to him in his account for the keepers he shall appoint.

1322 June 10 Haddelsey.

(Patent Roll 15 Edward II, pt 2, M 5 (Cal, p186)).

Mandate and request to all persons of the county of Pembroke and the cantreds therein to come properly armed to the king’s assistance in the Scotish expedition, as their laudable assistance lately given when the king was pursuing the rebels in the Marches of Wales makes the king confident they will be ready to do so; they are not to take it that their petitions before the King and council in the Parliament at York were postponed, as the king was fully occupied preparing for the said expedition, but on the king’s return they shall be attended to.

1324

Aymer de Valance died on the day that he married his third wife at Compiegne. He is buried beside his father in Westminster Abbey. He left no children. Aymer’s sister, Isabel de Valance, married John de Hastings and her son Laurence became Earl of Pembroke. He was succeeded by his son John who fought at the battle of Crecy. He died in 1375 and was succeeded by his son John who died at the age of 18 in 1390.

1324-1339

Edward II & Edward III (Minority of Laurence Hastings) held Pembroke Castle.

1324 August 20

(I.P.M. C Edward II Files 84 and 85).

Aymer de Valencia, Earl of Pembroke.

South Wales Inquisition taken before John de Hamptona, King’s Escheator, at Pembroke, 20 August 1324.

Jurors: Walter Maeleufaut, Walter de Castro, John Keiez (Kneghey) John Melin, Walter Harald; Stephen Perot, Walter Eliot; Wioti de Laureny, John Cradok (John de Luny) William de Crippynes, Thomas Martin, and John Scorlags.

Aymer de Valence held the county of Pembroke with its appurtenances of our lord the King in chief by the service of carrying the king’s sword on the day of his coronation.

Pembroke: The castle in the said county is worth nothing beyond reprisals. In the town of Pembroke there are 220 burgages paying yearly rent of assize of £1, in equal sums at Easter and Michaelmas.

The rent of Richard Symond for certain lands at Kyngesdoune, 6d at the same terms.

The rent of the glebe of the church of Roscrouthur 12d. at the same terms.

There are 3 water mills, worth yearly £20l

The prise of beer are worth 100s yearly.

There is a certain fair held on the feast of the Apostles Peter and Paul, for three days altogether, whereof the profit is 2s.

The tolls of the market there are worth 3s yearly.

The pleas and the perquisites of the hundred are worth 10s yearly.

Sum £36 19s 6d

Kyngeswode: The aforesaid Earl held the grange of Kyngeswode in the said county. In which there are: 1 messuage(?) worth 12d yearly; 2 carucates of land, worth 40s each yearly; 5 acres of meadow, worth 12d per acre; 2 acres several pasture, worth 6d per acre; and a certain ferry called "Penebroke Fferre", paying 26s 8d rent yearly at Michaelmas and Easter.

Sum £30 13s 8d

St Florence: The said county also contains the manor of St Florence, in which there are: a capital messuage, woth 12d yearly; 1 carucate, 3 bovates and 4 acres of land, worth altogether 60s yearly; 2 acres meadow, worth 12d per acre yearly; 30 acres several pasture, worth per acre 4d yearly; 4 acres marshland (marisci) worth 8d per acre yearly; a water mill worth 26s 8d yearly; a certain park, the yearly profit of which is nothing beyond the keep of the wild stock (ferar’) a customary rent of assize of £28 yearly in equal sums at Easter and Michaelmas; the rent of the cottagers there 6s 8d yearly, payable as above; the pleas and the perquisites of the courts there worth 5s yearly.

Sum £33 14s .

Commote of Coytrath: The commote of Coytrath is in the said county, and comprises; The yearly rent of assize of the free tenants, 61s 7d., payable as above; the yearly rent of customary tenants who hold at their will, £4(?), payable as above; a certain wood of oaks there, called Coytrath, the pasture of which is [of no value] but the underwood and pannage is worth 3s yearly, payable at Michaelmas; in the said wood there is a certain profit called Virgavel, worth yearly 10s, payable in equal sums at Easter and Michaelmas; also ½ acre of marshland there , worth 12d yearly, payable at the same terms; also a mine of sea coal (fossatum... minera carbonis marini) paying a yearly rent of 16s 4d, as above; also certain gorse and heath land whose yearly profit is worth 10s, payable as above; also certain turbary, yielding the yearly rent of 6s 8d; the pleas and perquisites of the courts there are worth ½ mark.

Sum £9 12s 4d.

Town and Castle of Tenby: In the said county etc. The castle is worth nothing beyond reprisals; in the said town of Tynebey there are 220 burgages paying a yearly rent of £11 as above; 50a of arable land arrented at 8d. per acre, payable as above; 1a meadow, worth 12d yearly; 11a pasture, worth 3d per acre yearly; the customs of the port with the tolls of the town are worth 60s yearly; the prises of mead and beer 20s yearly; 2 water mills and 3 wind mills, worth £10 yearly; the pleas and perquisites of the courts worth 20s yearly.

Sum £28 12s 1d

Castle Martin: In the said county etc. The manor of Castlemartin; 1 capital messuage, 12d yearly; 2 carucates of land, worth 40s each yearly; 15a meadow worth 12d per acre yearly; 300a pasture worth 2d per acre yearly; 100a marshland, worth yearly 10s, and no more because [....] 1 water mill and 1 wind mill, worth £9 yearly; rent of assize of the free tenants £4 5s 4d. payable as under; at All Saints 32s, at the Purification of Holy Mary 10s 8d, at Whitsuntide 32s, on the gul of August 10s 8d; the rent of Philip de Luny for a certain weir attached to the lord’s land at the mill of Ffoyn, payable at All Saints’ and Whitsuntide,1/2 mark; rent of assize of the free tenants with the rent of ffemyssheston, payable in equal sums at All Saints’ and Whitsuntide 100 marks; the customary rents there £72, payable as under; All Saints’ £31 17s 2d; Purification of Holy Mary, 62s 9 1/2d; Whitsuntide £32 17s 2d; Gule of August 62s 91/2d; the rent of John de Castro and Isabella, his wife, who held for term of life one third of the vill of Carston, 46s 8d payable in equal sums at Easter and Michaelmas; the rent of assize of the ville of Angle at Michaelmas 18d; the rent of assize of the vill of Luny at the same term 20d; the pleas and perquisites of the courts there are worth 60s yearly.

Item in the said county there are; the rents of assize of divers tenants by military service, 109s 1d, payable at Michaelmas 69s 1d, at Whitsuntide 40s; the rents of assize of divers tenants by socage £4 payable in equal sums at the aforesaid terms; the pleas and perquisities of the county of Pembroke, of the Obligation Court and the Court before the Castle Gate (placitorum frisce forc’ cur’ ante portam Castri)... are worth yearly 20marks.

Heirs: John de Hastings, Elizabeth Comyn, Joan, wife of David de Strabolgi, Earl of Athol.

Summary of the said Aymer’s lands, inter alia, in co. Pembroke:

Castle of Pembroke Nil, besides reprisals

Town of Pembroke with appurtenances £36 16s 6d

Grange of Kyngeswode 113s 8d

Manor of St Florence £33 14s

Commote of Coytrath £9 12s 4d

Castle of Tenby Nil, besides reprisals

Town of Tenby £28 7s 1d

Manor of Castle Martin £102 22d [Dower. inde dos £40]

Foreign Rents and Profits ("forniseca") of the entire county £ 22 15s 9d

Oysterlof £7 13s 4d

Tregeir manor in Overwent 55s 10 1/2d

Castle of Goderich £41 12d

Sum £290 11s 4 1/2d

1324 August 20 Pembroke

(C Edward II File 85).

Extent made before John de Hamptona, King’s escheator, at Pembroke 20 August 1324 Jurors Walter Maeleufaut, Walter de Castro, John Keiez (Kneghey) John Melin, Walter Harald; Stephen Perot, Walter Eliot; Wioti de Laureny, John Cradok ( John de Luny) William de Crippynes, Thomas Martin, and John Scorlags.

[as per C Edward II file 84 plus following]

Aymer had in the county of Pembroch 25 ½ knights’ fees and one

tenth knight’s fee, whereof :

* Caru, 5 knights fees held by John de Carru, worth yearly, 100m

* Maynerbir, 5 knights’ fees held by John de Barri, worth yearly 100m

# Stakepol, 5 knights’ fees held by Richard de Stakpol, worth yearly, 100m

* Osbarnestoun, one tenth knights’ fee held by David de la Roche, worth yearly 26s 8d;

# Flemisshton, half knights’ fee held by Walter de Castro, worth yearly 100s

* Benegereston one knights’ fee held by John Beneger, worth yearly 26s 8d

# Popetoun, half knights’ fee held by Stephen Perrot, worth yearly 10m

* Kilkemoran, half knights’ fee held by John Scorlagh, worth yearly 10m

# Moristoun, half knights’ fee held by Walter de castro, worth yearly 10m.

* Costyneston 2 knights’ fees held by John Wogan, John Beneger and William Robelyn, worth yearly 40m.

* Esse half knights’ fee held by Walter Maleufaunt worth yearly 10m.

* Jurdanestoun, half knights’ fee held by John Joce, worth yearly 10m

# Mineyerdoun half knights’ fee held by John de Castro Martini, worth yearly 10m

* La Torre, one tenth knights’ fee held by John Vaghan, worth yearly 26s 8d.

* Coytrath one tenth knights’ fee held by Nicholas de Bonvill, worth yearly 26s 8d

# Coytrath one knights’ fee held by John Chaumpan worth yearly 10m

* Coytrath half knights’ fee held by Andrew Wiseman, worth yearly 5m

* Coytrath one tenth knights’ fee held by John Scorlag worth yearly 13s 4d

* Coydrath one tenth knights’ fee held by David Maleufaunt worth yearly 13s 4d

* Westirathvaghan one tenth knights’ fee held by William Hervi and others , worth yearly 10s

* Blanculcoyt one tenth and one twentieth knights’ fee and 12a land held by John de Castro Martini worth yearly 20s

* Kethlihavelok one tenth and one twentieth knights fee and 24a land held by John de Castro Martin worth yearly 20s

* Lanteg 5 bovates of land held by John Vaghan, John Ereband, and William, son of Nicholas de Barri, by knights service worth

yearly 13s 4d

* Wyston 2 ½ knights’ fee held by Walter Wogan and Walter de Staunton worth yearly £33 6s 8d

Rescrouther (40m) St Florence (40m) Londes (100s) the advowsons of the churches

Summary of the part of the above manor "for one part of a moiety of two parts of the inheritance of Pembroke in demesne for the boy", inter alia

Wales: As on [File 84] above, omitting Castle Godrich and Manor of St Florence

Total Value £175 16s 41/2d besides dower (preter dotem)

Summary do., as above "in reversion" for the boy Ie., Laurence, son and heir of John de Hastings, inter alia, Manor of St Florence £33 14s ; 40 librates of land in Castle Martin, £40 £73 14s

Summary of fees in "demesne" for the boy inter alia Pembroke in Wales. Those marked * above

Sum of Fees £17 ½ + 1/3of one knight’s fee.

Sum. of fees in "reversion" for the boy inter alia Pembroke in Wales Those marked # above

Sum of Fees, 8

1324 December 6

Assignment of Dower to Mary, late the wife of Aymer de Valence made at Castle Martin 6 December 1324.

The Manor of St Florence, which was assigned to her in the king’s chancery.

The Manor of Castle Martin as follows:

a moiety of the capital messuage, to wit, a moiety of the grange on the south with a certain adjacent plot for the "Daeria integra", and a moiety of the oxhouse (Boverie) in the east, the easements of which are valued at 6d yearly; also 1 caruucate of land extended at 40s yearly, 5 of meadow (5s), 100a pasture (16 8d) 331/3 a. of marsh land (3s 4d ), the rents and services of John de Luny, John Fitz, Henry Dawe, David Meyler and Joan his wife, free tenants (34s 7d); the rents and services of David Swayn, Alice Bede, Henry Milot, Richard de Cruce, Henry Moriz, Richard Moriz, Robert Moriz, David Moriz, Rose Ermegard, John Goldeburgh, John Heylyn, John Robert Thomas Richard, Philip Haye, Rees Thomas, Hugh Joyl, Philip Rys, William le Yunge, Philip le Yunge, Res Penkaron, William Rou, Philip Rou, John Knethill, Elen Gilbert, Ade de Leffery, William de Landfey, Walter seys, John de Hibernia, John de la Haye, Matilda Prikker, Mable Prikker, John le Prikker, John son of Philip Rys, John Rys, Richard Philip Joye and Mable his wife, John Griffith, Henry Milot, Ade de Slade, Richard Adam, John Lewlyn, Ralph le Machon, David Eynon, John Ffiret, junior, John Blethery, Alice Warynot, John Kayoc, John Kedyvor, John Streyt, John Bolour, Robert textor, Mable le gras, Robert Rys(?), Robert le Longe, Philip de la More, elen, dau. of Philip Brounyng, Suetilde of Castle Martin, Henery Hobbekyn, and Walter Lide; bondtenants which are extended at £33 9s 11d yearly.

And the perquisites of the courts for the said tenants free and bond at 30s yearly.

Sum Total of the Assignment of the said Mary’s dower in the manor of Castle Martin £40.

1325 March 2 The Tower London

(Fine Roll, 18 Edward II, m 6, (Cal, pp. 334-5)).

Committment during the pleasure to Richard Symond of the office of the stewardships of the county of Pembroke and of Haverford in Wales, and of the keeping of the castles, towns,manors and lands which Aymer de Valencia, earl of Pembroke, tenant in chief, had on the day of his death in the said county and the land of Haverford, in the king’s hand by his death, to hold with the pleas and perquisities of courts and all things belonging to the said office and keeping so that he answer at the Exchequer of England for the issues thereof.

Order to John de Hampton, escheator in the counties of Gloucester, Hereford, Worcester, Salop and Stafford, and the march of Wales adjacent, to deliver the same to him.

1325 April 28 Winchester

(Close Roll, 18 Edward II, m 6 (Cal, p. 288)).

Order to John de Hampton, escheator in Hereford (etc) and the adjoining marches of Wales, to deliver to Hugh le Despenser, the younger, certain lands and tenements, to wit the castle and the town of Pembroke, the barn of Kyngeswode, the commote of Coytrath, the castle and town of Tenby, the manor of Castle Martin (except £40, of land and rent in the same held by Mary, late the wife of Aymer de Valence, in dower), the manor of Tregeyr, the rent and foreign profits of the whole county of Pembroke, and the commote of Oysterlof which premises are assigned to Lawrence, son and heir of John de Hastyngs, a minor, from 12 February last, when the King granted the custody of the said Lawrence’s property, until he came of age to the aforesaid Hugh.

1326 Oct 29 Caerphilly

(Patent Roll, 20 Edward II, m 7 (Cal p. 334)).

Appointment of Rees ap Griffith to raise all the forces of the county and bring them to the king; with power to arrest the disobedient ...

1327

Edward III, born 1312 became king in 1327 and in 1330 put an end to the usurped authority of his mother, Isabella, and Roger Mortimer.

1330 October 23 Leicester

(Fine Roll 4 Edward III, m 15 (Cal p. 194)).

Order to Gilbert Talbot, justice of South Wales, or his lieutenant, and all sheriffs, constables or keepers of castles, bailiffs ministers and others in South Wales and the lands of Bergeveny and Pembrokeshire, to be intendant to William de Brom and Thomas Ace, whom the king has appointed to seize into the king’s hand the castles, manors, towns, lands, goods and chattles of Roger de Mortuo Mari, earl of March, as well those which he held in fee or for a term of years or by name of wardship, as for any other cause, in the said parts, which earl the king caused to be arrested as above [Previous entry in the Roll], and to cause the said castles etc. to be safely kept, so that they answer for the issues thereof by those whom they depute to the keeping of the same, and to make indentures of the goods and chattles between them and two knights or other good men in the places where they be found, whereof one part shall remain with William and Thomas, and one part with the knights or good men, and to make inquisition in those parts if any such goods have been withdrawn, where, by whom, at what time and in what manner, and to seize the same again into the king’s hand and bring them back to the places whence they were withdrawn, and to cause them and the other said goods to be safely kept until further order.

1330 December 8 Westminster

(Close Roll 4 Edward III m 15 (Cal p. 77)).

Order to the steward of Pembroke, to restore to Rhys ap Griffith, suit of his land, goods and chattles within his bailwick, as were taken into the king’s hands upon suspicion by his having adhered to Edmund, late earl of Kent, as the king deems him guiltless and has restored his lands.

1331 January 13 Westminster

(Patent Roll 4 Edward III pt 2 m 11 (Cal p. 43)).

Appointment of Walter de Casto Martini to the bailiwick of the office of forester of Coytres, co. Pembroke, during good behaviour.

1331 February 4 Langley

(Fine Roll 5 Edward III m 30 (Cal p. 230)).

Commitment during the pleasure to Richard Symond of the office of steward of the county of Pembroke, so that he answer at the Exchequer for the issues thereof, receiving the usual fee.

1331 February 18 Windsor

(Fine Roll 5 Edward III m 27 (Cal p. 235)).

Appointment during pleasure to Richard Symond as steward of the county of Pembroke and keeper of the castles, manors, towns and lands in that county, and of the land of Oysterlowe, in the king’s hand by reason of the minority of Laurence de Hastynges, and of the pourparty of Seint cler, Amygoeth and Pulniowg, late of Roger de Mortuo Mari, the king’s enemy and rebel, in the king’s hand by his forfeiture; so that he answer at the Exchequer for the issues thereof, receiving the usual fee. Order to Robert de Harle to deliver to him the castle of Pembrok and the manors, towns and lands in the said county, with all things in the said castle in his keeping, by indenture, etc.

1331 Feb 28 Croydon

(Close Roll 5 Edward III pt 1 m 24d (Cal p. 290)).

To Richard Simond, steward of the county of Pembroke, in the king’s hands by reason of the minority of Laurence, son and heir of John de Hastynges, tenant in chief of the late king. The king is sending to him in a bag sealed with the seal of John, bishop of Winchester, the chancellor, a seal that the king has caused to be made anew for the rule of the liberty of that county, and orders the steward to use the said seal in that liberty as was usual in times past.

1331 April 27 Stratford

(C.Inq Misc, File 115 (13), (Cal p290, No 1185)).

Stratford 27 April 5 Edward III 2, 27

Pursuant to complaint of wrongful disseisin by John de Castro.

Writ to Richard Simond, steward of the county of Pembroke:

Inquisition Tuesday the feast of St Barnabas, 5 Edward III.

Jurors: Walter de Bromhilla, Stephen Rou, John Beneger junior of Angle, Richard Harols, John Bron, Roger de Lony, Henry Beneger, John Dawe, John Eynon, William Robelyn, Walter de Schirborn, and William de Middilhille.

Aymer de Valencia, late earl of Pembroke, granted to John de Castro and Isabelle his wife for their lives 6 bovates of land in Corston in the said county, who peacefully held the said land without charter for a yearly rent of 46s 8d.

Thomas de Hompton, late steward of Pembroke in the time of Sir Roger de Mortuo Mari, late earl of March, who had the wardship (custodiam) of the said county by the king’s grant, wrongfully disseised the said John and Isabel, because the said John took flight for a certain debt which he was bound to David Bermond for a trespass, and for fear of imprisonment.The said John and Isabel at no time quitclaimed the said land to anyone. The said land is in the king’s hands by the death of the said Sir Roger, and is of the demesne land of the said county, and of the yearly value of 46s 8d, and is now in the king’s hands by the death of Walter de Castro, who held it at will by grant of the said Thomas de Hompton.

1331 July 20 Lincoln

(Patent Roll 5 Edward III pt 2 m 30d (Cal p. 199)).

Commission of oyer and terminer to Gilbert Talbot, justice of South Wales, John Giffard, William de Rupe, John de Stonford, and William Casse, on complaint by David de Barry that certain persons beseiged his castle at Maynerbir, co Pembroke, broke the doors and walls, carried away his goods there and at Pennaly and assaulted his servant.

The like to the same touching the murder of Edmund Barry, the said David’s servant, at the time of the commission of the said trespasses.

[the return made by the above commission is enrolled on the Originalia Roll of 5 Edward III m 49].

1331 July 24 Suthwell

(Inq Misc File 115 (14) (Cal p. 290 No 1186) Suthwell 24 July 5 Edward III 4, 28).

Commission to Gilbert Talbot, William de Rupe, John de Stanford and William Casse.

Inquisition before William de Rupe and William Casse, the king’s justice, Pembroke. Thursday after the Beheading of St John the Baptist.

Jurors: John Joce, Walter Malafaunt, William de.....ges, Richard of Trewent, Stephen Sutton, John Kneich, Thomas Wyriot, Stephen Rowe, David Bertelot, Walter de Schirbern, William Robelyn[?], Gyen de Laureny.

[Following plaint of the wrongful disseisin of David de Barry by Roger de Mortuo Mari, of Wigmore, on the ground that David was an adherent of Rees ap Griffith.]

Robert de Mortuo Mari having the wardship of the county and liberty of Pembroke, by reason of the nonage of Lawrence, son and heir of John de Hastings, by the king’s grant, caused to be seized into the king’s hands the land and the tenements of David de Barry, namely, the manor of Maynerbir, Seint Jamyston, and Neweton, member of the said manor, because to said Roger, as ward of the said county, forbade the said David from entering the manor of Pennaly on the possession of Richard de Barry; because the said Richard had no right to the said manor of Pennaly, except by the disseisin thereof made by him to the said David, and the latter ejected the said Richard contrary to the prohibition of the said Roger; so Roger seized the manor of Maynerbir with its members into the king’s hands, on Monday next after Michaelmas 1 Edward III. The said David never quitclaimed his right to anyone, and the said manor is worth £100 yearly, and is held in chief of Laurence, son and heir of John de Hastings, by the service of three knight’s fees. This inquisition was taken in the presence of Richard Symond, the steward of the said county, and keepers of the aforesaid tenements.

1331 Westminster

(C. Inq Misc File 117(9) (Cal p. 299, No 1218)).

Writ to the keeper of the county of Pembroke, Westminster, 16 December, 4 Edward III [1330]. By petition of the Council.

Inquisition before Richard Symond, steward of the County of Pembroke, at Pembroke, Monday after St. Mark, 5 Edward III (1331).

Jurors: John le Gras, Robert de Rupe, Stephen de Sutton, Robert Huscard, Richard Huscard, Thomas Martyn, John de Castro Martini, John de Knegh, Richard le Lange, Stephen Roo’, William de Neston’ and Robert Roblyn:

The King sent his writ of privy seal dated Northampton, 29 July, 4 Edward III, to Roger de Mortuo Mari, late Earl of March, keeper of the county of Pembroke, ordering him to seize into the king’s hands the barony of Walewayn Castle, which belonged to Guy de Brian and to deliver it to Guy de Brian, his son, to hold according to the terms of a settlement made in the king’s presence with the assent of Welthiana, wife of the said Guy, the father, and the friends of the parties, viz., that the barony should belong to Guy the son, who was bound to marry and advance his two sisters with the profits thereof, that £200. in which Dame Joan de Carreu was bound to Guy the father for the marriage of Guy the son should belong to him in aid of marrying his sisters; and, whereas the said Guy, the father, was not of sound memory or capable of making a feoffment, it was agreed by the said Welthiana and the friends of the parties that the barony should be seized into the king’s hand and afterwards delivered to Guy, the son, to perform the settlement. The said late Earl sent the writ to Robert de Malleye, and the bedel of Pembroke seized the barony into the king’s hand on Tuesday after St Bartholomew, 4 Edward III, and afterwards delivered it to Guy the son.

1331 m49

(Originalia Roll 3 Edward III m 49 County of Pembroke in South Wales).

The township (villata) of Newton for the chattels of David Calder, clerk, convicted, £4.

Phillip Tosse, condemned to death (indicio suspend adondicto)’ fine for saving his life (pro rita sua salvanda) pledges; John Mellyn, William Parchcorn, 20s.

The township of Carrew for the chattels of William de Carrew,

parson of the church of Carrew, a fugitive, 40s.

The township of Newton for the chattels of John Knight, fugitive, 3s 9d.

The township of Jameston for the chattels of John Craddok, of Jameston, fugitive, 23s 6d.

The same township for the chattels of David, son of Roger, fugitive, 25 s 10d.

Of John Mellyn, William Parchcorn for the chattels of Thomas Carrew, fugitive, £14 2s.

Of the same for the chattels of Richard Malefaunt, fugitive, ú6 19s 4d

Of the township (villata) of Pennali and manerbyr for the chattels of Richard de Barry, fugitive, £107 17s 4d.

Of the said John Mellyn and William Parchcorn for the chattels of

James Abbot, chaplain, fugitive, 40 s.

Of the township of Pembroke for the chattels of Thomas Martyn, clerk, convicted 20 marks.

Of the township of Jameston for the chattels of John, son of David le Wayte, fugitive 13s 4d.

Of the same township for the chattels of David Hamund, fugitive, 6s 4d.

Of the same for the chattels of William Craddok, fugitive, 23s 6d.

Of the same for the chattels of William Gerald, fugitive, 20s.

Of the same for the chattels of Richard Gerald, fugitive, 13s 2d.

Sum £195 14s 9d.

This schedule was delivered at the Exchequer personally by William Casse, one of the Justices mentioned above.

1334 December 2

8 Edward III

Execution to levy the above debts was made by writ directed to the Justice of South Wales as contained in the memoranda for Michaelmas, 1335 9 Edward III.

1331 October 8 Eversham

(Originalia Roll, 5 Edward III, m 19).

Order to Roger de Mortuo Mari, keeper of the county of Pembroke, to enquire touching any goods and chattles of Hugh le Despenser, the younger, late enemy and rebel, concealed in the said county.

1331

(Ancient Petition No: 14840).

Petition of the commonalty of the county of Pembroke for the appointment of a competent and suitable steward with power to govern the said county and to punish the grievances, oppressions and hardships done by the evildoers of the said county, after the death of the Earl of March, late warden of the said county, by the king’s grant, by reason of the minority of Laurence de Hastinges. Since the death of the Earl of March the said county has been without a keeper or warden, with the result that the common (menez) people of the county are oppressed and slain by the "great" evildoers (grantz meffesours).

1331 Oct 14 Westminster

(Closed Roll 5 Edward III pt 1 m 2 (Cal p. 270)).

To Richard Simond, steward of the county of Pembroke. Order not to intermeddle further with the manor of Maynerbir and its members of Seint Jameston and Neweton, as the king learns by inquisition, taken by William de Rupe and William de Casse in the steward’s presence, that Roger de Mortuo Mari, when he had the custody of the county by reason of the minority of Laurence, son and heir of John de Hastyng’, tenant in chief of the late king, on Monday after Michaelmas, in the first year of the king’s reign caused to be seized into the king’s hands the lands of David de Barry, to wit the manor and members aforesaid because David entered the manor of Penam ...... whereof Richard de Barry had unjustly disseised him, upon the possession of the said Richard of the said manor contrary to the inhibition and prohibition of the said Roger, and for no other cause, and the manor of Maynerbir and the members are still detained in the king’s hands, and that David has not remitted his right therein to any one, and has not changed his estate therein in any way, and that the manor and members are held of the aforesaid heir by the service of three Knights’ fees, and are worth yearly in all issues £100.

1331 November 16 Windsor

(Fine Roll, Edward III m 3 (Cal pp. 288-9)).

Grant to the king’s kinswomen, Elizabeth de Burgo, some time the wife of Roger Damori and executrix of his will, for the £1500 which Anthony de Passaigne, knight, assigned to her of the sum of £8,141 8s 6d wherein Edward II was bound to him, and which the king by Anthony’s assignment promised to pay her by letters patent surrendered by her in Chancery, and for the 500 marks which the king by writ dated 20 May last, ordered the treasurer and barons of the Exchequer to pay to the king’s kinsman, William de Burgo, earl of Ulster, for good service, in wardships and marriages within two years therefrom, as appears by inspection of the rolls of Chancery which she has undertaken to pay to the earl, her son, and for 250 marks which she will pay at the Exchequer, of the wardship of the following lands late of Aymer de Valencia, earl of Pembroke on Wales, to wit, the castle of Pembroke, not extended beyond reprises, the town of Pembroke, extended at £36 16s 6d, the grange of Kyngeswood, extended at 113s 8d. the commote of Coytrath, extended at £9 12s 4d. the castle of Tyneby, not extended beyond reprises, the town of Tynby, extended at £28 7s 1d, the manor of Castlemartin, extended at £102 22d whereof £40 are assigned to Mary, late wife of Aymer in dower, the manor of Tregeir, extented at 55s 10 1/2d. the foriegn rents and profits of the county of Pembroke extended at £22 15s 9d and the commote of Oysterof, extended at £7 13s 4d a year in the king’s hand by reason of the minority of Laurence de Hastynges kinsman and one of the heirs of the said earl of Pembroke, of his pouparty of the lands late of his said kinsman, to hold until the lawful age of the said Laurence who was of the age of five years on St Benedict the Abbot, 18 Edward II, as was found by an inquisition returned to Chancery; and if Laurence die before coming of age, his heir being a minor, she, her executors or assigns, shall have the said wardship until the time when Laurence would have been of full age, and if he die and the premises come to an heir of full age, the king will cause her, her executers or assigns, to have recompense from other wardships; so that she, her heirs and assigns keep the premises without doing waste, destruction and exile, and maintain at their cost the buildings therein in as good a state as they now are; saving to the king’s Knights fees and advowsons of churches.

Order to Richard Symond to deliver the same to her or her attorney, with the seal deputed for the office of chancellor of the said county, in his keeping of the king’s commitment.

Order to the tenants to be intendant.

1331 Dec 3 Clarendon

(Close Roll 5 Edward III pt 2 m 9d (Cal pp. 405-6)).

To the steward of the county of Pembroke in Wales. Whereas the king lately appointed Gilbert Talbot, his justice of South Wales, John Giffard, William de Rupe, John de Stonford, and William Casse his Justices to make inquisition by the oath of men of that county what evildoers had carried away the goods and chattles of David de Barry at Maynerbir to the value of £500 and had slain Edmund Barry his servant there, etc. and at whose procuration the slaying was done, and who afterwards harboured the evildoers, and to hear and determine the felonies; and afterwards at the prosecution of certain men of the county, by their petition before the king and council in parliament, suggesting to the king that the aforesaid commission was made and granted to the injury of the liberty of the said county, and to the damage and prejudice of the men thereof, and contrary to the custom hereto fore obtaining there, and praying the king to provide them with a remedy, the king gave the petitioners a day before him in chancery concerning the premises, and caused his serjeants for maintaining his estate there to be called, and the petitioners alleged before the king that the county is in the king’s hands by reason of the minority of Laurence de Hastynges, kinsman and co-heir of Aymer de Valence, late earl of Pembroke, and that in that county a seal to serve the people of the county in their suits ought to be specially deputed, and that such seal used alway to be appointed there in the times of the lords of that county for the time being from time out of mind, without the lords of the county using any other seal in any case there, and this they offered themselves ready to verify by the ways and means that they ought to do; and the king’s serjeant on the otherhand asserted that the lords of the county were wont at all times past to make their commissions concerning felonies and trespasses committed at that county under their own seals or under the seals deputed for the use of that county at their pleasure, and this they offered themselves ready to verify for the king; and the king thereupon appointed the aforesaid Gilbert and Thomas de Cheddeworth and Richard Symond to make inquisition by the oath of men of that county in their lifetime made such commissions only under the seal specially appointed for that liberty or under their own seals at their pleasure, and if under their own seals then what lords had done so etc.: and Master William de Carreu,Thomas de Carreu, and Owen ap Oweyn, and divers others have shown the king that they are indicted before the said justices of the felonies aforesaid, and that they are put in exigent by the king’s writ to the steward because they did not come before the justices or the aforesaid David, and they have besought the king to cause them to be delivered by mainprise pending the said inquisition, if they render themselves to prison; the king therefore orders the steward to cause the said men, if they render themselves to prison, to be delivered upon their finding mainprise to have them before the justices at the day upon which the writ of exigent is returnable, and to supersede the further exaction them.

1331 December 8 Clarendon

(Patent Roll 5 Edward III pt 3 m IId, (Cal p 236)).

Commissions to Gilbert Talbot, Thomas de Chadesworth and Richard Simon; on information that certain persons have carried away from the castle of Manerbire, Penaly and Carru the goods of Richard Barri, Thomas de Carru and William de Carru, and have forcibly possessed themselves of the lands of these same men, which were lately seized into the king’s hands by the steward of the county of Pembroke on account of their outlawry for non appearance before John Giffard, William de la Roche, John de Stouford and William Casse, justices of oyer and terminer, to answer touching the death of Edmund de Barry and the robbery of goods of David de Barry, at Manerbire, co Pembroke; to discover the guilty persons, to cause them to be arrested, with the aid of the posse comitatus if need be, and imprisoned until further orders, to recover the goods and lands for the king, and to return inquisition of their proceedings herein.

1333 March 30 Aberford

(Close Roll 7 Edward III, pt 1, m 19 (Cal p26)).

Order to the keeper of the land of Pembrok to cause 100 men from that land, both archers and others to be elected and provided with proper arms and to be brought to the king at Newcastle on Tyne, at the king’s wages, to be there a month after Easter next, to set out ultimately with the king against the Scots, who have invaded the kingdom; the king has ordered the chamberlain of South Wales to pay their expenses from the issues of the said Chamber, until they are at the said place.

1333 June 11 Tweedmouth

(Close Roll, 7 Edward III pt 1 (Cal., p 121)).

Order to the keeper of the land of Pembroke to cause proclamation to be made in his bailwick that no one, under pain of forfeiture, shall make gatherings of malefactors or armed forces to disturb the king’s peace or to terrify his people; and if anyone shall do so after such a proclamation has been made, cause them to be guarded in prison, etc, as the king has learned that after he had set out on his journey to Scotland, several malefactors and disturbers of the peace made illicit gatherings, beating, and wounding and even killing, and plundering the goods, etc.

1335 June 8 York

(Close Roll, 9 Edward III m19 (Cal pp. 411-2)).

To the treasurer and barons of the exchequer. William Crippyngis, of co. Pembroke in Wales, has besought the king by his petition as Thomas de Hompton, at the time when Roger de Mortuo Mari, late earl of March, had the custody of co. Pembroke by the king’s commission, and Thomas was the steward of the earl there, had caused William to be taken and long detained in prison, and while he was in that prison compelled him by force of such imprisonment to make a letter of obligation to the earl to pay 200 marks to the earl at certain terms contained in the deed, which was delivered to the exchequer for levying that money for the king’s use by reason of the earl’s forfeiture; and thereupon prosecution was so far made against William for the king at the exchequer that William, appearing in person before the treasurer and barons in the exchequer, asserted that he had made that deed by force of imprisonment as aforesaid, and offered to verify this in the way which the king’s court should think fit; and afterwards, because William believing that a certain issue of the affair had been ordained by the king’s court, did not come to discuss that affair in his absence before the treasurer and barons on the day given to him according to the process held thereupon, to answer upon that affair, it was considered there that the king should recover £128 6s 8d., this being in arrears of the said 200 marks, the said answer of William not being discussed to be pleased to grant that William may be admitted to such verification, not withstanding the aforesaid consideration, the king considering that the said deed ought to be of none effect if it should be found to have been made as the said Stephen (sic) pretends to verify, and wishing to do William a favour, in discharge of his conscience, orders the treasurer and barons to admit him to the said verification in the same state in which it was before the said judgement was rendered, the record and process held before them upon the premises being viewed, those being summoned before them who ought to be ; and to cause justice to be done further in that affair both for the king and for William, not withstanding the same consideration, causing the execution of the said £128 6s 8d so recovered, levied from William’s lands and chattels for the king’s use, to be superseded.

1335 June 8 York

(Close Roll 9 Edward III M19 (Cal p 412)).

A like order "mutatis muntandis" in favour of Stephen Perot of Co. Pembroke in Wales who was compelled to make a deed of obligation to the Earl (Roger de Mortuo Mari late Earl of March) of 600 marks and from whom it was considered that the King should recover 576 marks in arrears of said sum.

1335 December 12 Auckland

(Close Roll, 9 Edward III, m 4 (Cal., p. 455)).

To the steward of Pembroke or to him who supplies his place.

Order to cause Philip, son and heir of Walter de Staunton, who held of the heir of John de Hastyng, a minor in the king’s wardship, by knight’s service to have full seisin of all the lands of which his father was seised in his demesne as of fee in that bailiwick at his death, and which he held of the said heir because he has proved his age before Matthew Oran and Stephen Jacob, appointed by the king to take that proving,and the king has taken his fealty for the said lands.

1339 23 Oct Kennington

(Close Roll 13 Edward III, m.3 (Cal pp. 209-10)).

To William Trussel, escheator this side Trent. Order to supersede the livery of Laurence de Hastyngg, kinsman and co-heir of Aymer de Valencia, earl of Pembroke, of the castle, manors, towns, comotes,rents, profits and grange committed to Elizabeth de Burgo, late the wife of Roger Damory and executrix of his will,and if he has delivered them he shall cause them to be resumed into the king’s hand without delay and restored to Elizabeth together with the issues thereof to be kept until Laurence shall come of age; as on 20 May in the fifth year of the reign, the king ordered the treasurer and barons of the exchequer to pay to William de Burgo, earl of Ulster, 500 marks of the wardships and marriages in the kings hand or those which should come into the kings hand within two years, as is found by inspection of the chancery rolls, and Anthony de Pessaigne, knight, assigned £1500 to Elizabeth of the £8,141 8s.6d. in which the late king was bound to him for divers causes, for a like some in which Anthony was bound to Roger, and for the said £1,500 the letters for which Elizabeth surrendered to chancery, and the 500 marks to the earl, Elizabeth’s son which she undertook to pay to the earl for the king, and for 250 marks which Elizabeth paid to the king at the exchequer, the king granted to her the custody of all the following lands which belonged to Aymer de Valencia, sometime earl of Pembroke in Wales, to wit: Pembroke Castle, not extended beyond the reprises; the town of Pembroke, extended at £36 16s 6d yearly; the grange of Kyngeswode, extended at 113s 8d yearly; the comote of Coytrath, extended at £9 12s 4d yearly; the castle of Tyneby, not extended beyond the reprises; the town of Tyneby, extended at £28 7s 1d.; the manor of Castle Martin, extended at £102 22d yearly whereof £40 assigned in dower to Mary, late Aymer’s wife; the manor of Tregeir, extended at 55s 101/2d yearly; forinsec rents and profits of all co Pembroke, extended at £22 15s 9d. yearly; the comote of Ustrelof extended at £7 13s 4d yearly, which are in the king’s hand by reason of the minority of Laurence, who was five years old on the feast of St Benedict the Abbot, in the eighteenth year of the late king’s reign, as is found by inquisition returned into chancery to hold until that heir should come of age, or if he should die before, until his heir should come of age, and that if the heir should be of full age, the king would cause recompence to be made to Elizabeth according to the extent aforesaid, pro rata, for the time lacking of the majority of Laurence if he had lived, and now Elizabeth has complained in the present Parliament at Westminster, that the escheator has directed her to deliver those castles etc., to Laurence or his attorney by virtue of the king’s order; and the matter being brought before the council in the said parliament, it seemed that Elizabeth could not be amoed from that custody against her will before Laurence has come of age, in accordance with the tenor of the king’s letters to her.

(By the keeper and Council).

1340 June 25 Pembroke

(Add. Ch. 6027).

Special pardon by Laurence de Hastynges, Earl of Pembroke to Nicholas de Schirbourn of all homicides, robberies, etc.

Witnesses, Stephen James, deputy of Guy de Bryan, our Steward of Pembroke. (seal repaired/pendant)

1344 August 12

(C Inq Misc File 152(8) (Cal p 478 No 1907)).

Writ to the Mayor and Bailiffs of Bristol. Risyng, 12 August

Inquisition, Bristol 28 August 1344.

William le Whyte of Tynbegh, mariner, lately in a certain ship in the Irish Sea, was driven by a storm to Dunbretayn in Scotland on Thursday next after the Purification last past, and was imprisoned by the king’s enemies there for a fortnight and more; he did not willingly land there, and he has no goods.

1346-9 Black Death in Wales

1348 September 2 Westminster.

I.P.M. Edward III, files 91 and 92 Lawrence de Hastynges

Writ directed to John Scholle, escheator in co. Hereford and the March of Wales, Westminster, 2 September, 22 Edward III (1348)

Pembroke: Extent of the whole county made before John de Sholle, Thursday, the feast of St Michael, in Monte Tumba, 22 Edward IV (1348).

Jurors: John Perot, Thomas de Castro, John Cantrell, William Robelyn, William Parthecorn, Andrew Wyseman, Nicholas Shirborn, William Porthcrachan, John Beneger, Henery Beneger, John Robyn.

Town of Pembroke with Castle: In the said county is the town and castle, castle worth nothing beyond reprisal; 215 burgages in the town, yearly rent £10 15s at Easter and Michaelmas in equal sums; a certain rent of Torre and Carswill, 5s at the same terms; a certain rent of Eleanor Symond for certain lands at Kyngesdon, 6d at the Gule of August; profits of the 3 day fair at the feast of the Apostles Peter and Paul, 2s; tolls of the market 3s; tolls of horses in the barony of Careu and in Castle Martin, 6s yearly; pleas and perquisites of the hundred there, 10s yearly; the prise of beer there is worth yearly 100s; 3 water mills worth 20s yearly; 1 water mill newly erected worth 20s yearly; 1 fulling mill newly erected rendering 14s in equal sums at Easter and Michaelmas; rent of the glebe of Ruscuthur, 12d. at the same term; and from non residents in the town of Pembroke at Christmas; 9s. (et de non iacentibus in villa Pembr’ tempore Natalis, 9s ad terminum Pasche [sic])

Kyngeswode and Guidon: At Kyngeswode 1 messuage and 1carucate of

land, yearly rent 100s; 8 bovates at Goudon, yearly rent £6 8s; certain land at Bornfford, 41s yearly; certain land which philip Daniell held 7s; 5a of meadow worth 5s yearly ie 12d per acre; a certain ferry called Pembrokesfery, worth 40s yearly, payable at Easter and Michaelmas.

Coytrath In the said county is the commote of Coytrath; rent of assise of the free tenants there, 76s 10d yearly, payable at Easter and Michaelmas; 3 water mills rendering 24s yearly etc; the rent of customary tenants there holding at will £9 yearly, payable at the same terms; a certain wood of oaks whose pasture is common to the entire lordship (patrie), and there is no underwood , but the pannage there is worth 3s yearly payable at Martinmas; in the said wood there is a certain profit called "Vyrgauyl", worth 15s yearly, payable at Easter and Michaelmas; the moiety of 1 acre of marsh land paying 18d yearly etc. a certain piece of land called Stanborgh worth 36s,yearly etc. a certain turbary there worth 6d yearly etc.; the pleas and perquisites of the courts there worth 13s 4d yearly.

Tenby In the said county is the said town of Tenby with castle;the said castle is worth nothing beyond reprisals (magnas exigit reprisas) ; rent of assise of the town, £12 12s at Easter and Michaelmas; 50a arable, 50s; 1a meadow, 18d; 12a. pasture, 7s; "burgesses by the wind" and chensers (adventicii et casarii), 26s 8d; customs of the port together with the toll of the town, 60s yearly; prise of mead and beer, 40s yearly; three wind mills and one water mill, worth £13 6s 8d. yearly; and the pleas and perquisites of the Hundred there are worth yearly 13s 4d; and the pleas and perquisites of the Foreign courts there 50s.

Castlemartin: In the said county is the manor of Castle Martin

containing: 1 capital messuage worth yearly 40 (?....), 1 carucate of arable land, rent £7 yearly; 10a meadow, worth 13s 4d yearly; 200a pasture, rent £4 10s yearly; 100a of marsh land worth 10s yearly and no more because always wet (et non plus quia semper aquosa); divers parcels of pasture, rent 26s yearly; the ploughing(arura) and the sowing (messionis) of Lony, 40d yearly; a certain rent of Angle, 18d pro messione; 3 mills, 1 water and 2 wind, worth 10s yearly; rent of assize, £50 16s 3d, namely, £42 9s 01/4d at All Saint’s and Whitsuntide in equal sums, at the Purification and the Gule of August 79s 21/4d, at Easter and

Michaelmas £4 16s 41/2d in equal sums; rent of the mill of Ffroyn, 6s 8d. at All Saints and Whitsuntide; for the land called "Borgh", 17s 4d yearly at Easter and Michaelmas; the pleas and Perquisities of the courts there, 100s yearly.

Rents and Wards of the Castle of Pembroke: In the said county

there are divers free tenants holding by military service and socage, £10 13d, payable at Easter (£4 6s 6d) and Michaelmas (£5 14s 7d); and the pleas and perquisites of the County Court, of the Court at the Gate of the Castle, and of the obligation court (obligac’ forc’) are worth yearly 30s.

Laurence died at Abergavenny, Saturday, the Morrow of the Decoration of St John the Baptist. John de Hastings is his next heir, aged one year and more.

Summary

Pembroke town and castle..... £39 5s 6d

Kyngeswode and Guidon... £16 12d

Coytrath commote. £17 10s 2d

Tenby Town and castle. £38 8s 2d

Castlemartin manor.... £ 81 6s 9d

Rent and Wards of the Castle of Pembroke £30 13d

1348 September 24 Pembroke

Writ of certiorari de feodis etc., to John de Shol, escheator in Hereford and the adjacent March of Wales, 24 September, 22

Edward III Extent of all fees and advowsons of churches in the county of Pembroke, made at Pembroke on Thursday in the feast of St Michael de Monte Tumba, 22 Edward III.

Jurors; John Cantrel, William Adam, William Robelyn, Thomas de Castro, Andrew Wysman, John Beneger..... John Rou, John Robyn, William Parttrahan, John Hilton and Henry Beneger.

Laurence de Hastings, Earl of Pembroke, had in the county of

Pembroke 251/2 knights fees and three carucates of land, viz;

Carreu 5 fees held by John de Carreu, worth yearly 100m

Maynerbir’ 4 ¼ fees held by Oweyn ap Owen and Avice, his wife worth yearly 84m

Ogiston half and quarter fee held by William de Rupe, worth yearly £10.

Costenyston, two fees held by Thomas Morgan. William Robelyn and Ralph Benger’s heirs, worth yearly 40m.

Beneregiston, one tenth fee held by Willian Beneger and Joan his wife, of the right of the said Joan, worth yearly 26s 8d.

Esse half fee held by William Maleufant, worth yearly 10m.

Wyston 21/2 fees held by Philip de Stouton and Mathias Morgan severally and in equal portions, worth yearly £33 6s 8d.

Jordanyeston half fee held by John Joce worth yearly 10m.

Torre, one tenth fee held by John Vaghan, worth yearly 26s 8d.

Coytrath, one tenth fee held by Nicholas de Boleville, worth yearly 26s 8d.

Coydrath half fee held by Andrew Wysman, worth yearly 10m.

Coydrath one tenth fee held by Walter Scurlages, worth yearly 13s 6d.

Coydrath one tenth fee held by William son of Thomas of Carreu, John Maleufaut, John Perot, worth yearly 13s 6d.

Blengilgoyt one tenth and one twentieth fee and 12a of land, held by Philip de Castro Martini, worth yearly 20s.

Kethlihavelot one tenth and one twentieth fee and 24a of land held by John de Castro Martini, worth yearly 20s.

Nanteg 5 bovates of land held by John Champaygne, John Vaghan, and John Cok, worth yearly 13s 4d.

Westrathvaghan one tenth fee held by David Elyot and other tenants worth yearly 10s.

Glinbogh 2 carucates of land held by William [son of Henry] worth yearly 40s.

The undermentioned fees were assigned to Mary de Sancto Paulo, countess of Pembroke, after the death of Aymer de Valencia, late Earl of Pembroke: Stakepol 5 knights fees worth yearly 100m.

Fflemingyston, half knight’s fee worth yearly 100s.

Popetoun half Knights fee worth yearly 10m.

Kilermorran half knights fee worth yearly 10m.

Menierdon half knights fee worth yearly 10m.

Coydrath, one knights fee held by John Champaigne, worth yearly 10m.

Moriston half knights fee worth yearly 68s 10d.

Osberneston one tenth knights fee held by Robert de la Roche, deceased, whose heir is a minor in the Queen’s wardship worth yearly 26s 8d.

Advowsons of Churches: Roscrouther (40m). Londes (100s).

St Fflorence. Mary de Sancto Paulo has the advowson (40m)

1348 Oct 1 Westminster

(Patent Roll 22 Edward III pt 2 m 2d (Cal p179)).

Writ of aid directed to the bailiffs, ministers and others of the lordship of Pembroke, and other lordships late of Laurence de Hastynges, late earl of Pembroke, in Wales and the marches, thereof, in favour of John Sholle, escheator in the county of Hereford and the march of Wales adjacent to that county, whom the king has appointed to arrest all persons, whereof there are said to be very many, hindering him in doing what is for the king’s profit and belongs to his office, and refusing to be attendant unto him, and imprison them until the king give other order therein.

1348 October 13 Westminster

(Patent Roll 22 Edward III pt 3 m 30 (Cal., p 193)).

Grant to Richard Chaumberlein of the office of porter of the castle of Pembroke and of the keeping of the prisoners within that castle now in the king’s hands by reason of the nonage of {the heir of} Laurence de Hastynges, late earl of Pembroke, tenant in chief, to hold during such nonage with the usual fees and wages.

1348 November 7 Sandwich

(Patent Roll, 22 Edward III pt 3 m 26 (Cal.,pp.199-200)).

Inspeximus and confirmation of letters patent (given in French) in the castle of Bergeveney, on 30 April Edward III of Laurence de Hastynges late earl of Pembroke ....

The like, with respect to letters patent of the earl under the seal of his chancery of Pembroke, tested by William de Menill, his steward of Pembroke on 26 August, 20 Edward III, granting to Richard de Cestre, in compensation for losses sustained in his service beyond the seas, that whereas he holds for life the office of hayward of Carmarthen of the earl’s grant, with wages of 1d. a day, he shall have 1/2d a day as increase of such wages.

The like with repect to letters patent of the earl tested as above at the castle of Pembroke, on the 17 January, Edward III, granted to his servant (famulo), William Redhefd, for his life, the constableship of the castle of Tenebegh, with the office of "cachepoll" of that town, with the wages of 1d. a day at Pembroke, out of the earl’s exchequer there.

1348 December 10 Westminster

(Close Roll 22 Edward III, Pt 2 m 5 (Cal., pp579 80)).

To Thomas Cloptin, keeper of the wardrobe, to whom the king committed the custody of two parts of the land in co. Pembroke in Wales, which belonged to Laurence de Hastynges, earl of Pembroke, tenant in chief in the king’s hand by reason of the minority of the earl’s heir, to hold until that heir should come of age.

Order to permit Richard de Cestr[ia] to hold the office of reaper of Castlemartin and to pay him his wages of 11/2d a day and the arrears thereof, as the earl granted that office to Richard to hold for life, receiving 1d a day for his wages, and afterwards the earl granted him 1/2d a day in augmentation of his wages for damages received while in the earl’s service in parts beyond the sea, which grant the king ratified and pardoned Richard any trespass committed by him in acquiring the said office without licence.

To the same: Like order to permit John de Loud to hold the office of forestership of Coytrath and to pay him his wages of 1d a day and the arrears thereof, which office and wages were granted to him by the earl to hold for life, and the king ratified that grant and pardoned John any trespass committed by him in acquiring the said office without licence.

To the same: Like order to permit William Redhefd to have constableship of Tenby castle and the office of "catchepol" of that town, and to pay him the wages of 1d a day and the arrears therof, in accordance with the earls grant to him confirmed by the king.

1348 Dec 28 Westminster

(Close Roll, 22 Edward III, pt 2 m 7 (cal p. 577)).

To Robert Talebot, fermor of the castle of Pembroke and of the other lands in co. Pembroke in Wales, which belonged to Laurence de Hastynges, earl of Pembroke, tenant in chief in the king’s hand by reason of the minority of the earl’s heir, to hold until that heir should come of age.

Order to permit Richard de Cestr[ia] to hold the office of reaper of Castlemartin and to pay him his wages of 11/2d a day and the arrears thereof, as the earl granted that office to Richard to hold for life, receiving 1d a day for his wages, and afterwards the earl granted him 1/2d a day in augmentation of his wages for damages received while in the earl’s service in parts beyond the sea, which grant the king ratified and pardoned Richard any trespass committed by him in acquiring the said office without licence.

To the same: Like order to permit John de Loud to hold the office of forestership of Coytrath and to pay him his wages of 1d a day and the arrears thereof, which office and wages were granted to him by the earl to hold for life, and the king ratified that grant and pardoned John any trespass committed by him in acquiring the said office without licence.

To the same: Like order to permit William Redhefd to have constableship of Tenby castle and the office of "catchepol" of that town, and to pay him the wages of 1d a day and the arrears therof, in accordance with the earls grant to him confirmed by the king.

1349 January 27 Langley

(Patent Roll 23 Edward III pt1 m 31 (Cal p 252)).

Inspeximus and confirmation of an indenture, dated at London, 23 January ,22 Edward III, witnessing that Thomas de Clopton, king’s clerk, keeper of the king’s wardrobe, by virtue and authority of grants by the king to him and his successors in the office of two parts of the lands late of Laurence de Hastynges, earl of Pembroke, tenant in chief, to hold during the nonage of the heir, rendering to the king yearly in the wardrobe for the expenses of his household £733 6s 8d yearly, had demised to Richard Talebot, knight, the elder, the castle and town of Pembroke with their members of Kyngeswode and Gwydon, and the commote of Coytrath, the castle and town of Tyneby, the manor of Castle martin, and the rents and castleguards of the castle of Pembroke, parcel of the two parts aforesaid to hold to him, his executors and assigns during such nonage, rendering to the keeper of the wardrobe £320on the morrow of the Ascension and the morrow of All Souls in the wardrobe, or if the king be without the realm, in the church of St Paul. London; with the power for the warden to re enter into the same is at any time the rent be one month in arrears. Grant also that the said Richard shall hold the premises and the county of Pembroke, with all the appurtenances, as fully and entirely as the earl held of the king, saving to the king’s knights’ fees and advowsons of churches, and so from heir to heir.

1350 April 20 Westminster

(Originalia Roll 24 Edward III m 8).

Special pardon to Richard Talbot, owing to the pestilence of £60 the arrears of his farm (£320) of the county of Pembroke for the first year of his grant, and of £80 for each following year during the nonage of the heir; the said Richard to pay £240 yearly, in equal sums ,on the morrow of the Ascension and the morrow of All Souls

1351 November 12 Westminster

(Patent Roll 25 Edward III pt 6 m 1 (Cal p 199)).

Whereas Richard Talbot the elder, to whom the king lately committed the castle and town of Pembrok, with their members of Kyngeswode and Gwydon, the commote of Coytrath, the castle and town of Tymby, the manor of Castle Martin and the rent and ward of the castle of Pembrok, late of Laurence de Hastynges, earl of Pembroke, tenant in chief, as well as the county of Pembroke, during the nonage of the earl’s heir, has surrendered the said keeping and letters patent made to him thereof, the king has committed the custody of the same, with all appurtenances thereof, to John Hakelut and Agnes his wife, late the wife of the earl, to hold until the full age of the heir, if Agnes live so long , as of value of £320 yearly, whereof it is the king’s will that for such time as they hold the keeping they shall pay him in the wardrobe £240 yearly, at Whitsunday and Martinmas, retaining the balance for the sustenance of the heir. In the event of the death of Agnes during the nonage of such heir, the premises shall revert to the king.

1353 February 8 Westminster

(Patent Roll 27 Edward III Pt 1 M 27d (Cal p 447)).

Commission to John de la Bere, Owayn son of Owayn, Walter Malenfant and Eynon Vaghan, reciting that the king has received a plaint of Thomas son of Richard Wyryot, containing that, although he holds of John son and heir of Laurence de Hastynges, late earl of Pembroke, who is within age and in the king’s ward, one knight’s fee in Orieldoune and Kilpatrikeston co. Pembroke, by service of a rose yearly and a moiety of a horse for arms in time of war, doing suit once a year at the gate of the castle of Pembroke and rendering besides to Philip Roger and John Says yearly 24s 4d of rent sec and the said fee has always hitherto been held peacefully of the ancestors of the said heir, earls of Pembroke, nevertheless the said Phillip and John, claiming that the fee is held of them and not of the heir , distrain him to do service thereof to them to his damage and the danger of disherison of the heir, wherefore he prays for a remedy; and appointing them to make inquisition in the county and find the whole truth of the matter. The keeper of the lands late of the earl, and all the king’s bailiffs and ministers, in the county, are hereby commanded to be obedient to them in the premises and to furnish jurors as required.

1353 March 5 Westminster

(Patent Roll, 27 Edward III, pt 1 m 20 (Cal p 415)).

Grant to William Fort of the office of porter of the castle of Pembroke and of the keeping of prisoners within the castle, which is in the king’s hands by reason of the nonage of the heir of Laurence de Hastynges, late earl of Pembroke, tenant in chief, to hold during such nonage, with the accustomed fees and wages.

1353 June 6

(Chancery Misc. Inquisition No 168).

Writ dated 6 June Edward III, touching the knight’s fees held by the late Laurence de Hastings, Earl of Pembroke.

Inquisition at Pembroke 6 April 27 Edward III, before Thomas de Aston.

Jurors: John Melyn, William Parthcorn, Thomas Castel, Richard ..rchard, John Wydelok, John Suteri, John Coke, David ap Llewelyn Vaughan, John Castel de fflemyneston, John..... Edward Castel, John Bisschop.

John Perot on his death (Monday n.a. S. Gregory, 23 Edward III), held by the demesne of Pembroke, one messuage and 100a of land by military service, worth in gross 16s 8d., and did suit to the county court of Pembroke; the said John held of Mary de St. Paul, Countess of Pembroke, 2 carucates 6 bovates of land in Popton, by military service worth 66s.; also he held of John de Hilton in Custynes[ton] one carucate worth 30s yearly; also he has at Westperit 12d. yearly rent for a certain tenement in Ithmorston, one carucate of land near the borough of Pembroke worth 24s. yearly, also he held 2 bovates of land in Osbarnstoun in burg worth 4s yearly; also one carucate and two bovates of land in Walwaynston in burg, worth 24s yearly; and the marriage of his heir is worth 40m; John de Carrew, kt., has the marriage of the said heir by the king’s grant.

Walter Scurlag held of the heir of Laurence Hastinges, late Earl of Pembroke, in free socage, 30a of land in Begeristoun, worth 5s yearly; also he held jointly with Margaret his wife at Kylkemoran the moiety of a knight’s fee, worth 40s yearly; and the said Margaret his survivor, holds the said tenements for her life. And he held of John de Carrew, kt, 11/2 carucate of land at Martheltwist, worth yearly ½ mark; also he held of the heir of Laurence de Hastinges 70a in Coytrath conjointly with Margaret his wife, his survivor as above, worth yearly 11s 8d. Also he held of the heir of the aforesaid Lawrence 30 acres of land by Welsh law (per legem Wallensicam) which lands owe no ward and marriage, worth yearly 5s.;

Nicholas de Shirbourn, on his death, held of the demesne of Pembroke 50s 4d of rent in Scurlageston, of which Margaret, his wife, held one third in dower. Also he held 21/2 carucates of land in Angle of the Earl of Gloucester conjointly with Margaret his wife who survived him and worth 100s yearly; John son of the said Nicholas, is his next heir, and was 18 years old on the death of his father. Also he held 12s rent in Angle of the Earl of Gloucester, of which the said Margaret receives one third by way of dower. His marriage is worth 20 marks.

William Robelyn, on his death (Thursday n.a. St Trinity 23 Edward III) held of the demesne of Pembroke 2 ½ carucates of land in Costeyniston by military service and doing suit to the Court of the gate of the castle of Pembroke, and worth 40s yearly; also the free tenants of the said William pay a yearly rent of 4s 4d. Also he held of John de Carrewe kt., three bovates of land in le thorne, worth yearly 6s; and Robert, son of the said William, is his heir and was 13 years and more at the time of his father’s death; his marriage is worth £20.

John Champaygne, at his death (Friday n.a.Easter, 23 Edward II) held of the demesne of Pembroke 30a of land in Lantege doing suit to the county of Pembroke and is worth 5s yearly; also he held of Mary or the Countess of Pembroke one knight’s fee worth 60s yearly in Kylneygi, of which Margaret mother of the said John, holds one third in dower. Isabella, his daughter, is the next heir, aged three years at the death of her father. Her marriage is worth 20 marks.

John Maleufaunt, at his death (15 August, 23 Edward III) held of the demesne of Pembroke 30 acres of land in Loudeschirche by military fee and doing service to the county of Pembroke worth 2s 6d yearly. David his son, is next heir, age 9 ½ years on his father’s death. His marriage is worth 10s.

Andrew Wiseman, at his death (at the Feast of the Conception of the Holy Mary, the Virgin), held of the demesne of Pembroke in chief half a knight’s fee by military service in Seintussilt, worth 60s yearly, of which Agnes his wife, receives one third as dower, and John Vaughan 1 mark yearly rent. John, Andrew’s son, is next heir, age 15 years. His marriage is worth 10 marks.

John Craddok, at his death (Monday after the Feast of the Assumption of Holy Mary, 24 Edward III), held of the demesne of Pembroke, 6 bovates of land in Neuton, worth 20s yearly. Roger, is son, is next heir, age 17 years. The said Roger married the daughter of Nicholas Schirbourn, et disponsati fuerint in crastino post obitum patris. His marriage is worth 20s.

1355 July 20 Westminster

(Original Roll 29 Edward III m 5).

Pardon to John Hakelut and Agnes, his wife of £80of the farm of £320 (their farm from the earldom of Pembroke) from 20 February 28 Edward III. to the expiry of their custody aforesaid, the said John and Agnes for the period when the heir remains with them at their cost from the said 20 February, to pay £200 yearly, and to be entirely exonerated of the remaining £120; but to pay £280 yearly for the same custody in case the marriage of the said heir is sold to them or if they are relieved of the sustenance of the said heir.

1357 April 8 Westminster

(Originalia Roll, 31 Edward III m 3).

(1) Grant that John Hakelut and Agnes his wife, be allowed any sums expended by them upon the custody of the earldom of Pembroke over and above the yearly farm of the earldom, etc.

(2) De Relevio. Rex dilecto siti Edwardo Hakeluyt, escaetore, suo in comitatu Hereford et Marchie Wallie eidem comitatui adiacente salutem. Quia accepimus per inquisicioneim quam per te fieri fecimus quod Andreas Wyseman defunctus tenuit in dominico suo ut de feodo die quo obiit medietatem unis feodi militis cum pertinentiis in sancto Hussildo et Treberth, in comitatu Pembrochie de herede Laurencii de Hastynges nuper comitis Pembrochie defuncti qui de nobis termit in capite infra etatem et in custodia nostra existente per servicium militare et faciendi sectam ad eundem comitatum de filio predicti Andree est heres eiusdem Andree propinquior et plene etatis. Cepimus fidelitatem ipsius Johamus nobis in hac parte debitam et medietatem predictam et reddidimus. Et ideo tibi precipimus quod accepta securitate ab eodem Johanne de racionabili releuio suo nobis soluendo aad scaccarium nostrum medietatem predictam cum pertinentiis que per mortem predicti Andree et racione minoris etatis dicti heredis prefati comitis capta est in manum nostram prefato Johanni.

Liberes sal vo iure cuiuslibet. Test apud Westmonasterium viij die Aprilis.

1358

(I.P.M.., 5 Edw. III, 2, no 163).

Sir William de Carew held of John Shirburn, by military service, ten messuages, five carucates and three bovates of land at Angle.

1358 February 24 Westminster

(Close Roll 32 Edward III, m 27 (Cal p 438)).

To Guy de Braine, lord of Walwyn’s castle (Castri Guwini), and to all the tenants of that lordship, and those residing therin. Order to be attendant upon making suit at the county of Pembroke, and to be attendant upon the lordship of Pembroke, and obedient to Agnes, late wife of Laurence de Hastynges earl of Pembroke, to whom the king has committed the custody of the lordship and county of Pembroke, to hold until the earl’s heir come of age, and to her ministers, in all pleas as well of freehold as of trespasses pleaded by writ, and in pleas of the crown concerning that lordship, the tenants and residents therein, for the time that see has that custody, as they used to be to the earl, and attempt nothing to the prejudice of the heir during his minority; as the king is informed that although in the earl’s time Guy used to make suit at the county of Pembroke, and all such pleas arising within that lordship were pleaded, and all the tenants and residents therein were attendant upon the earl and his ministers of the county of Pembroke at his summons and order, of which suit, etc., the said earl died seised in fee, but Guy has refused to make that suit from the time when the county of Pembroke came into the king’s hand by the death of the earl and the minority of his heir, and has not permitted any such plea of freehold or trespass or plea of the crown to be pleaded or determined at Pembroke, nor the said tenants or residents to be attendant upon the ministers of the king or others to whom the wardship of the lordship and county is committed, and the king wishes to provide for indemnity of the heir who is a minor in his wardship, especially as he is bound to preserve the rights of such heirs as fully as their ancestors died seised thereof.

1358 May 10

Writ 10 May 32 Edward III, to Henry de Prestewode, escheater in co. Hereford and the adjacent marches of Wales, directing him to enquire of what liberties belonging to the earldom and lordship of Pembroke, the said earl was seised, and who has occupied the same since his death. (Laurence de Hastings died 30 Aug 1348).

Inquisition made at Pembroke, Thursday the feast of St Petronilla, 32 Edward III (31 May 1358).

Jurors: William Maleufant, Richard Trewent, John Melyn, John Wodelok, Thomas Wyriot, William Parchcorn, John Castell, John Seys, Thomas Castell, Henry Standard, John Ricon, and John Pucell.

Castle Gaweyn the suit of Guy de Brian, knight, at the county of Pembroke for his manor of Castle Gawain, and also all pleas of free tenement and trespasses to be impleaded by writ, trespasses in which fines and ransoms are to be adjudicated without writs, pleas of debt by letters obligatory containing penalties, with writs and without writs, and all pleas of the crown within the said manor touching the said Guy and the tenants and residents there and from everything arising within the said manor except pleas of the crown with mainour (manuopere) at the suit of the party; and the said Guy and the tenants and residents within the said manor were bound to assist the said Earl and his ministers of the county of Pembroke when summoned, at the county of Pembroke and at the courts of the gate of the castle of Pembroke for pleas of obligation and fresh force within the said county; and the sheriff of the county of Pembroke used twice every year,at Easter and Michaelmas, to hold his turn in whatsoever place he wished within the lordship of castle Gaweyn, and to attach those indicted before him and take them to the castle of Pembroke, there to be judged according to the law and custom of the country, and to do the office of coroner whenever necessary within the said lordship. The earl died seised of all the foregoing in his demesne as of fee.

Kemeys: The suit of James Daudeleye, knight, pertaining to the said county of Pembroke by reason of his lordship of Kemeys and the other liberties aforenamed within the same lordship, as pertaining to the said county.

Carruw: The suit of John de Carruw for his lordship of Carruw and all the other liberties aforenamed, as pertaining to the said county.

Manerbyr: The suit of Owen ap Oweyn for the lordship of Manerbyr and all the other liberties aforenamed, as pertaining to the said county.

After the death of the said earl, Richard Talbot by the king’s commission and John Hakeluit and Agnes, countess of Pembroke, by the same commission, from the time of the said earl’s death until now have occupied all the aforesaid liberties, except that the aforesaid Guy has refused to do suit at the county, and has altogether withdrawn it, and has not permitted any plea of free tenement or of trespass to be pleaded by writ or without writ, or any plea of the crown within the said lordship touching the said Guy or his tenants or the residents in the said lordship to be pleaded or determined at Pembroke, nor the tenants or residents to assist or in any way to obey the king’s ministers or those of Richard Talbot or of John Hakelut and Agnes, late wife of the said Earl, to whom the king committed the custody of the county of Pembroke from the time of the earl’s death, but from that time has occupied and still occupies, by what title the jurors know not, all the aforesaid liberties and cognisances of pleas.

1359 March 20 Westminster

(Patent Roll 33 Edward III pt 2 m 27d (Cal p 278)).

Commission to Rhys ap Griffit, John Gogh, John de Wodhull and John de Longeleye, to make inquisition in the county of Pembroke touching divers wardships, marriages, escheats and other profits pertaining to the lands of the inheritance of John, son and heir of Laurence de Hastynges, late earl of Pembroke, who held of the king in chief, now in the king’s ward, pertaining to the lordship of the same county, which, as the king is given to understand, have been concealed from him and occupied by others since the lands came into his hand. The king has commanded Agnes, late the earl’s wife, and her ministers in the county and lordship to be intendant and answering to them in executing the premises, and to cause jurors to come before them as required.

1366

(Patent Roll, 40 Edward III, pt 1, m. 6 & 3).

Inspeximus in favour of the earl of Pembroke etc. of the particulars of the partition temp. of the heritage of William Marshal, etc.:

(a) Knight’s Fees in Pembroke

1] Share of the Countess of Wareinne

Nicholas fitz Martin 4 fees

Richard Araud 1 fee

Walter fitz Gilbert 1 fee

Philip Bosher 1 fee

Adam de Angulo 1 fee

2] Share of John de Monte Canesio

Walter of Hereford 3 fees

William of Karru 5 fees

David de Barrye 4 fees

Gowelin ap Baron 1 fee

Walter Benger and his cosharers

‘participes’ 2 fees

Adam fitz Henry Quarter part of a fee in Koffyn

3] Share of the Earl of Gloucester

John son of Philip 1 fee

Richard of Angle 2 fees

Ralph of Alton 1 fee

Guy de Bryane 1 fee

Simon de Bryane Half of a fee

William de Hutone Half of a fee

Alexander Robelyn One twentieth part of a fee

4] Share of the heirs of De Fferrariis

Philip of Stackepoll 4 fees

John de Villa Maur Half a fee

William of Popetoun 1 fee

Stephan Bauzan One and one half fees

Richard Lupus One tenth of a fee

Peter Watevill Half of a fee

John Ffucer Quarter of a fee

Richard de Briuly Quarter of a fee

David de Interbergh Half of a fee

Robert de Morton Half a fee

Robert Streech Quarter of a fee

William de Stokes One twentieth of a fee

William Fflandrensis One fee

Henry Tolye One fee

David de Wudeworth Half of a fee

Philip Luceyn Three loads of salt for quarter of a fee

John de Gatesden Quarter of a fee

Walter Chaucehoes 2s and tallage, scutage and allowance for

one sixth part of a fee

b] EXTENT OF PEMBROKESHIRE

Tinbegh

Extent of the manor of Tinbegh: Rent of burgages £10 12s 6d. Pleas, prises and protections, £14 7s 6d; the demesne and the meadow, 6s 8d; mills 33s 4d; Courts of Tinbegh, 2s; pleas of the Court of the Castle, together with the pleas of the tenants of Coytrach, 60s.

Sum total, £30 2s

St Fflorence

Extent of the Manor: Rents of assize, £4 3s 2 3/4d; works, 28s 1d: the demesne, meadow, mill, pleas and perquisites of the Courts, £10 9s 6d.

Sum total, £16 9 3/4d

Pembroke

Extent of the Manor of Pembroke: Rents of assize, £10 1s 7d; mills, prises and tolls of Pembroke, £18 6s 8d; the demesne £4 16s 2 1/2d; the meadow, 12s 9d; pleas and perquisites of the Courts of Pembroke, 40s; pleas of the county of Pembroke, 60s; the demesne of Coytrath, 40s; the woodgafol of Coytrath and of Tinbegh, and the pannage and sale of furze (Jaonia), 44s 8d; the pleas and perquisites of Coytrath, 20s. Sum total, £44 1s 10 1/2d

Castle Martin

Rents of assize, £33 14s 8 3/4d; marks, 23s 3 1/2d; the demesne, mills, pleas and other issues, £24 6s. Sum total £60 4s 0 1/2d.

Sum total of Pembrokeshire, £372 3s 0 3/4d (Including the values of Haverford, Narberth and Cilgerran).

1369 February 20 Westminster

(Patent Roll 43 Edward III pt 1 m 26 (Cal p 223)).

Licence for the king’s son John de Hastynges earl of Pembroke, to enfeoff certain persons as he pleases of the castle and county of Pembroke, the castles and lordships of Tynby, and Kilgarren and the commote of Oystrelowe, in Wales, said to be held in chief.

1370 January 22 Westminster

(Close Roll 43 Edward III, m 1 (Cal p 223)).

To Edward, prince of Aquitane and Wales, his stewards and representatives, and to the mayor and bailiffs of Tynby in Wales. Order, as they love the king and his honour and desire the salvation of the realm, to cause all ships of 100 tons burden and upwards with sufficient gear which are in the port of that town to be arrested without delay, furnished with seamen, men at arms, armed men and archers, and brought to the port of Plymouth, so that they be there at latest within four days after the Purification next, ready each ship with double equipment of seamen to sail on the king’s service in the company of Guy de Bryene as he shall give them notice on the king’s behalf; as the king has charged the said Guy to sail with certain ships of the realm to resist the malice of the king’s enemies of france, who are now at sea, and with God’s help to destroy them.

1375 April 21 Westminster

(Patent Roll 49 Edward III pt 1 m6 (Cal p 124)).

Commission to John Joos "chivaler", Hugh Brumhull, parson of the church of Carru, and Thomas Castel, to be the king’s attorneys, to receive seisin in his name from Walter Amyas, John Abraham, John Doune, John Prat, and Ralph de Walsham of the castle and county of Pembroke, the castles and lordships of Tynby and Kylgarren and the commote of Oystrelowe in Wales, to hold until the end of the term contained in certain charters indented, with remainder in tail to John, son and heir of John de Hastynges late earl of Pembroke, and reversion to the king and his heirs.

1375

(Close Roll 49 Edward III m 3d (Cal pp. 286-7,-8)).

Record of proceedings before the council, and reciting the licence given by the king on 20 February in the forty third year of the reign, to John de Hastynges, then earl of Pembroke, to make a feoffment to particular persons to whom he would, and to their heirs of the castle and county of Pembroch, the castles and lordships of Tynby and Kilgarren and the commote of Oysterlowe in Wales, which are held in chief, and to such persons to have seisen of the premises and give the name to the said earl and to the heirs of his body, with remainder after his death for lack of such issue to the king and his heirs; also licence given by the king to the said earl to alien in fee simple to whatsoever persons he would all other his castles, lordships,manors, and lands, with the fees and advowsons which he had in demesne or in reversion in England or Wales, being held in chief, the manor of Asshle, co. Norfolk, excepted and of such persons to take again such estate as he pleased, namely, to himself alone or jointly with other in fee simple, fee tail or for life, and to entail, give or grant the same to whom he pleased with remainders as he should appoint at his own will and pleasure; and reciting that by virtue of that licence the said earl by charter enfeoffed Walter Amyas, John Abraham, John Donn, John Prat, clerks, Ralph de Walsham and Thomas Criklade and their heirs, as well of the said castle and county of Pembroch, the castles and lordships of Tynby and Kilgarren and the commote of Oysterlowe as of all other his said castles, lordships, manors, lands, fees and advowsons held by him in chief in England and Wales which he had in demesne and in reversion, the manor of Asshle excepted, and also of all other his manors, lordships, lands, fees and advowsons in England and Wales not held in chief which he had in demesne or in reversion; reciting also that the said feoffees after demised to the said earl for a term of five years beginning 20 March 43 Edward III, as well the castle and county of Pembroch, the castle and lordship of Tynby and Kilgarren and commote of Oystrelowe, as other the castles, lordships, manors, lands, fees and advowsons aforesaid, the manor of Asshle excepted, and that within that term he (as John de Hastynges, earl of Pembroke, lord of Weisford and Bergeveny) made a surrender to them of his estate in the premises, a confirmation of their estate, and a quit claim with warranty to them, their heir and assigns (a French text follows), dated at his inn at London, 15 April, 46 Edward III; and further reciting that after upon his passage to Gascony the said earl caused a shedule to be written making mention of those feoffments, and specially requesting the said feofees truly to perform certain his wills, and to dispose of his castles, lordships and lands according to the form of that schedule, causing the same to be sealed with one seal of his in form of a letter patent and closed up, sealing the same when closed, with the ring on his finger, and sending the same so closed and sealed up from the sea to the said feoffees; and reciting that now in the quinzaine of Michaelmas, 49 Edward III, the said earl being dead over sea, certain of the said feoffees, namely, the said Walter, John Donne, John Plat and Ralph de Walsham, came before the Council at Westminster and there delivered the said schedule closed as aforesaid, which was before the Council opened, and there viewed and understand (French text follows), whereby the said earl gave the said feoffees knowledge of his will, charging and requiring them, if he should die over sea before returning to England, of the issues of his said lands to levy and pay his debts, in case full execution of his will might not be by his executors made of his chattels, and then in case he should die without an heir of his body to amortise the manor of Tovenham to the church of St Paul, in order to keep his anniversary every year and to find twelve wax candles thoughout the year, burning at reasonable times about his tomb, and if there should be any impediment wherefore the said manor might not be amortised, to sell the same and pay the money therof arising to the profit of the said church and the "Chartehous" in London, for the purposes aforesaid, charging them also in case he should die without issue to enfeoff the king of the castle and county of Pembroke, the castle and lordships of Tyneby and Kilgaren and the commote of Oisterlowe, and to give to his cousin, Sir William Beauchamp, and to his heirs for ever, all other the castle, manors, lands, etc., in England and Wales, which the said feoffees had by his feoffment, and the reversion of the castle, town and lordship of Bergev[eny], and of all the manors, lordships, lands, etc., held in dower by Dame Mary de Seint Pawl, in England and Wales, upon condition that he shall bear the whole arms of the said earl, and shall prevail with the king (face tant eidees nostre Seigneur le roi). That he may bear tha name of earl of Pembrok to him and his heirs, and if he will no or may not do so, to make a feoffment and grant of the premises to his cousin, Sir William de Clynton, upon the same conditions, this schedule bearing the date in the same earl’s inn in London, 5 May 1372; whereupon the said feoffees there professed that they ever were and are ready to their power truly to fulfil all the wills and conditions in that schedule contained and to do nought contrary to the earl’s will; and the said William Beauchamp, after appearing in person before the Council in presence of the said feoffees, averred, in so far as the matter therein contained concerned him, that he was ready for himself and his heirs to perform the same according to the earl’s will namely to bear the whole arms of the said earl and to make suit with the king and his heirs that he and his heirs should have, receive and bear the name of earl of Pembroke in case the said earl should die without issue, praying the king and council and the said feoffees to keep whole and unimpaired the estate and right of him the said William and of his heirs therein; but because the said earl dying over seas has an heir of his body, who is now within age as the council is assured, it is determined that the king shall have the wardship of the said castles, manors, lordships, lands, etc., until the lawful age of the said heir, saving to Anne, who was the wife of the said earl, her dower of the same.

1375 November 24 Westminster

(Patent Roll 49 Edward III, pt 2 m 12 (Cal p 194)).

To Nicholas Daudele, lord of Kemmoys, and his tenants there.

Whereas they are bound to do certain and various suits, services and dues to the king as for the castle and county of Pembroke, which are in the king’s hand by reason of the nonage of the heir of John de Hastynges, earl of Pembroke, who held in chief, and they and their ancestors anciently, and sometimes in the time of John, did the services as they ought, although for some time past they have newly withdrawn the same and still refuse to do them, as the king has learned; the king, not wishing the services to lapse while the castle and county are in his hand to the probable derogation of the rights of the heir, orders them to render the said services to him, and forbids the same Nicholas to draw services to himself as though they pertained to the lordship of Kemmoys in the said county, because they do not so pertain. And if by virtue of this mandate any of the said tenants may seem likely to incur prejudice or injury, then let them come to the council for swift justice.

1376 28 May Westminster

(Inq A.O.D. File 389, 125).

Writ, Westminster, 28 May, 50 Edward III (1376), following petition by the burgesses of Tenby requesting a grant of the privilege that they should be quit from toll throughout England, Ireland and Wales, as the burgesses of Pembroke, Haverford west, Carmarthen are, in respect of which they now suffer seriously.

Inquisition before Thomas de Castro, steward and sheriff of Pembroke, Tuesday next after Feast of Apostles Peter and Paul, 50 Edward III.

Jurors: Mathie Wougan, William Malesium, Richard Wyriot, Peter Perot, John Scarloge, Thomas Perot, William Benger, Phillip Estenere, John Lucas, Laurence Bromhulle, Philip Percivall, and William Whyte.

Who say that it would not be to the damage and prejudice of the king to grant that the burgesses of the town of Tenby be quit of toll, murage, plancage, and passage, and all other customs as the burgesses of Pembroke etc., as above.

1376 July 4 Westminster

To Nicholas de Audele and Elizabeth, his wife, tenants of the castle and lordship of Newport in Kemoys. Strict order under pain of forfeiture to do their suit to the county of Pembroke as they are bound according to the agreements hereinafter recited, doing nought which (may tend) to prejudice or impair the liberties and privileges of the king therein contained, ceasing altogether to do wrong to the king’s men and tenants there, and so behaving in the matter that the king shall have no matter for wrath against them as those who impugn his privilages and liberties, as on 5 November (the year omitted), Edward I, agreement was made between William de Valencia, earl of Pembroke and William Martyn, lord of Kemoys, whereby the said William Martyn acknowledged that he and his heirs were bound to do suit to the county of Pembroke, from county to county, for the land of Kemoys, that the said earl and Joan his wife, and the said Joan’s heirs should have cognisance in all the land of Kemoys, of rape, arson in time of peace, forestall, treasure trove, of appeals of manslaughter and of other felonies without the man or whatsoever, also the forswearing of felons in church, and the office of coroner concerning manslaughter, the bailiffs of the said William (Martyn) and his heirs being nevertheless warned to be present if they would, saving to William Martyn and his heirs and to their bailiffs there the attachment and judgement of such felons.

1376 August 24 Blatherwick

(Close Roll 49 Edward III m 23d (Cal p 248)).

Indenture of demise made to the king by Walter Amyas, John Abraham, John Downe, John Peat, clerks and Ralph de Walsham of the castle and county of Pembroke, the castles and lordships of Tynby and Kylgarron, and the commote of Oystrelowe in Wales, to hold until Martinmas next and thence forward for a term of eighteen years, at which time John, son and heir of John de Hastynges earl of Pembroke will come of age, and after that term to the said heir and to the heirs of his body with remainder, for lack of such issue, to the king and his heirs, reciting licence given to the said earl at his request by the king’s letter patent in the forty third year of his reign to make to whom he pleased a feoffment of the premises , which are held in chief, and to such persons to take and have seisin therof, and to give the same to the said earl and to the heirs of his body, with remainder, for lack of issue, to the king and his heirs, that by virtue of the said licence the earl made a feoffment to the said Walter, John Abraham, John Dunne, John Peat and David Perkyns, clerks, the said Ralph and Thomas de Cryckelade, and to their heirs, that the said David and Thomas as now dead, that the earl died without again enfeoffed thereof John his son and heir being within age, that the king would by law have the wardship of the said heir if such feoffment had again been made to the earl in his lifetime, and that it is lawful and reasonable that so far as may be the king be saved harmless.

Witnesses: William Bishop of Winchester, Master Adam de Houton bishop of St David’s, Sir William Latymer the chamberlain, Sir John de Neville steward of the household, Sir John Knyvet the chancellor, Sir Richard Lescrofte the treasurer, Sir Nicholas Carreu keeper of the privy seal, Sir John de Cavendish the chief justice, Sir Robert Bealknap chief justice of the Common Bench, ir William Tauk chief baron of the exchequer. Dated Westminster 21 April 49 Edward III.

Memorandum of acknowledgment by the said Walter and Ralph 23 July.

1376 Hereford

(INQ. 49 Edward III File 246/22).

Inquisition, Hereford, Saturday, Feast of St Dunstan, 49 Edward III, before John Sergeant, king’s escheator, in cos.Glos. and Hereford and the Marches of Wales.

Jurors: John Pride, Baldewyn de Brugge, John ap Rees, William Rous, Thomas de Maynes, John Walewayn, Ivanni Vaghan ap Ievan ap Howel, William de Boarton, Walter de la Halle, Rees ap Wylym, Simon de Brugge, .....

Lands of John de Hastynges, late Earl of Pembroke.

Before his death he had enfeoffed certain persons with the following premises among others: the castle and county of Pembroke, the castle and lordship of Tenby, Cilgerran, and the commote of Oysterlow, worth 300 marks yearly.

1376

(I.P.M., Edward III, 247, f. 63).

Summary of the extent of the manors late of John de Hastynges Earl of Pembroke, held of the king in chief inter alia, Marches of Wales.

The castle and county of Pembroke, the castles and lordship of Tynby, Kilgarren and the commote of Oysterlowe, with appurtenances, extented at £200.

1376 20 November

(I.P.M., Edward III, 248, f. 105).

Writ of certiorari de feodis, d. 20 November, 49 Edward III. Edward de Brigg. Extent. .. 49 Edward III.

Jurors: Richard de Houton, Roger Creytol, Henry Brace, Richard de Brompton, John de Mulle, Hugh Wrembrugge, Walter Keveryk, Walter Bisshewall’, John Kawerose, Walter Rouse, Henry ap Ieuan, Walter Heynes.

John de Hastinges late Earl of Pembroke, deceased, held the undermentioned fees and advowsons of the king in chief, viz: 5 knight’s fees in Carrewe, held by John de Carrewe, worth £25 yearly; besides reprisals; 4 ½ knight’s fees in Maynorbury, held by Owen ap Owen and Amicia, his wife, worth in gross £22 yearly; a moiety and Quarter of a knight’s fee in Hoggeston, held by William de Rupe, and worth in gross 100s yearly; two knight’s fees in Costyneston, which William Robelyn, Thomas Wogan and Ralph Beneger formerly held, worth in gross £21 yearly; one tenth of a knight’s fee in Robeston which William de. ....worth in gross 10s yearly; half a knight’s fee in Esse, which W.. formerly held worth etc. 50s; 2 ½ knight’s fees in Wiston, which Willian de(?) Standon and Mathias Wogan hold and worth, etc., £12 10s; moiety of a knight’s fee in [Jordany]eston which John Joce formerly held and worth. .... one tenth of a knight’s fee in Torre, which John Wogan formerly held worth etc., 10s; one tenth of a knight’s fee in Coytrath which Sir. .... formerly held and worth etc. 10s; Half a knight’s fee in Coytrath which Andrew Weseman formerly held, worth etc. 50s; one tenth of a knight’s fee in Coytrath which William Scorlage’ formerly held and worth 10s: one tenth of a knight’s fee in Coytrath which William, son of Thomas of Carrew, John Malefaunt, and John Perot formerly held and worth etc., 10s: one tenth and one twentieth part of a knight’s fee in Glangilgoyd which Philip of Castle Martin formerly held and worth etc., 10s; one tenth and one twentieth part of a knight’s fee and 24a of land in Kethlyhavelot which Philip of Castle Martin formerly held and worth etc., 10s; five bovates of land in Nantege which Philip Champaigne, John Vaghan and John Cok formerly held and worth etc. 8s; one tenth part of a knight’s fee in Westrathvaghan which David Elyot and other tenants formerly held and worth etc. 10s; two carucates of land in Glynyburgh formerly held by William Fitz Henry, worth etc 20s: [5] knight’s fees in Stakepol which Richard Stakepol formerly held and worth etc £20; half a knight’s fee in fflemis[ton] which Walter de Castro formerly held and worth etc 60s; half a knight’s fee in Popetoun which Stephen Perot formerly held and worth etc., 50s.; half a knight’s fee in Mynyerdon which [John] of Castle Martin formerly held and worth etc. 50s; half a knight’s fee in Moristoun which William de Castro formerly held and worth etc., 50s; a knight’s fee in Coytrath which John Champaigne formerly held and worth etc. ....; moiety of a knight’s fee in Mauh, ,,,in Walles which Sir Morgan holds and worth etc 20s; one knight’s fee in Lamenir [in Walles] formerly held by Adam ap Ivor, worth etc. 100s; one fourth part of a knight’s fee in Lancadok and Lamanoz(?) in Wales, formerly held by. ....Vaghan and worth etc. 26s; one third of a knight’s fee. .Michaelis in Wales, which Ieuan ap Henry formerly held and worth etc. 33s(?)..... part of a knight’s fee in Lan. ... in Wales which William le Walssh’ formerly held and worth etc. 26s; moiety of a knight’s fee in Wr. ...re in Wales which William de Brom’formerly held and worth etc. ......; moiety of a knight’s fee in Maynde. .... in Wales, which David Launden formerly held and worth etc., 60s; one third of a knight’s fee in Wales which Erdedevel vergh Howell held and worth etc. 40s;

Advowsons Kylgarren (£4 beyond reprisals), Maynerde (10marks, etc), Pencrath(?) (60s).

Lanyhauel (£4, etc), Rescogthurg (40m?) Londes (100s etc) .....(£40. Etc.), St de Whitchurch, St Thomas de Geveren(?).

1377 February 16 Westminster

(Patent Roll 51 Edward III m 3d (Cal p. 501)).

Commission to John Joce "chivaler", Henry Wogan " chivaler", Matthew Wogan, Peter Perrot, William Malenfaunt, Laurence Bronhull, Richard Huscard, John Scurlag, Richard Wyrot, Peter Jurdan, John Wydlok, Philip Sutton, the mayor and commonalty of Pembrok, and Tenby, and the king’s steward and ministers of Pembroke, on complaint by the men of the county of Pembroke in Wales that William Wyriot and other perpetrators of homicides, robberies and other misdeeds by his favour and maintenance , have often imposed such threats upon the king’s ministers there that for a long time they have not dared to do justice to complainants for damages and injuries inflicted on them in this respect, or govern the king’s people there in their laws and customs, through fear of death to arrest William, bring him to Pembroke Castle, compel him to find sufficient mainpernors who will mainpern under penalty of £500 to have him before the king or elsewhere at the king’s pleasure, and that he will not do or procure anything which could turn to the contempt or prejudice of the king, or the damage of his ministers and people, and keep him in prison in the said castle until he be willing to find such security.

1377 February 16 Westminster

[second entry on m.3d].

Commission to John Joce, "chivaler", Henry Wogan, "chivaler", Matthew Wogan, William Malenfaunt and Peter Perrot, on information that many defects in the castle of Pembrok, situated by the sea coast in the port of Milford, are threatening through lack of good keeping and repair to the great peril of the loss thereof and of the parts adjacent if any peril of hostile attack arise, because there is no munition of armed men or others for the defence thereof or vituals for their sustenance to survey the castle and its state in their own persons and inform themselves by the information of good men and men skilled in deeds of arms, and otherwise, touching the defects in the same, what quantity of vituals and how many armed men and others would suffice for the munition and defence of the castle, and how much such munition would cost.

1377 March 3 Westminster

(Patent Roll, 51 Edward III, m 28 (Cal p 438)).

Appointment, during pleasure, of John James of Haverford as forester of the forest of Coydrath, co Pembroke, and keeper of the wood of Rodewode, in the same county, which forest and wood are in the king’s hand by reason of the nonage of the heir of John Hastynges, late earl of Pembroke, who held in chief, taking the accustomed wages and fees, with power to execute the office by deputy.

1337 Richard II

(Harl. MS. 1309, f. 11 (Owen Cat., p 249)).

Claims in respect of services to be performed at the coronation of Richard II. John de Hastings in right of the castle and town of Pembroke, etc., to bear the second sword before the king.

1377

Richard II seized the priory of Pembroke which time an extent of its possessions was taken.

Extenta Prioratus de Pembrochia 1 Ric II.

Ecclesia pertin ad dictum Prioratum.

Ecclesia de Castelmartyn ultra reprisas Valet per annum 1 marc.

Item dicunt quod Ecclessia sancti Nicholai cum duabus capell ultra reprisas

Val úx li

Item dicunt quod Ecclesia sancti Michaelis valet per annum ultra reprisas úxiij. vjs viijd

Summa Valoris ecclesiarum iiijxx. úvj. xiijs.iiijd.

[Payment]

Pensiones pertin. ad dictum Prioratum

Ecclesia de Angulo redd. per annum xxiijs ad term. Pasch.et santi Michaelis.

Ecclesia de Porttraghan red. per annum ad eosdem term viijs

Ecclesia de Tymbregh redd. per annum ad eodem term xiijs iiid.

Ecclesia de Tallagharn redd. per annum ad eosd. term xs.

Ecclesia de Sancti Cumano redd. per annum ad eosdem terminos ijs.

Ecclesia de Londchirch redd. per annum ad eosdem terminos ijs.

Ecclesia de Villa Galdfrido redd per annum ad eosdem terminos ijs.

Ecclesia de sancto Ismael redd. per annum ad eosdem terminos js.

Ecclessia de Crynwer redd. per annum ad eosdem terminos ijs.

Summa Pensionum ixxjs

[Portion]

Portiones pertin ad dictum Prioratum.

Ecclesia de Wynnoci val per annum ixvjs viijd.

Ecclesia sancti Petroci val per annum xxvjs viijd.

Ecclesia de Costynton val per annum xs.

Ecclesia de Nassh val per annum xid.

Ecclesia de Carne val per annum xiijs.

Ecclesia de Pennaly val per annum xiijs iiijd.

Ecclesia de Sancti Florentii val per annum xijd.

Summa Portionum úvj. xiijs. iiijd

1377 July 2 Westminster

(Patent Roll., Richard II pt 1, m. 27 (Cal p. 6)).

Commission to Degarius Seys, knight, to take in addition to the nineteen men at arms and twenty archers with whom he was ordered by the late king to safeguard Pembrok’ Castle (which is in the king’s hands by reason of the minority of his heir), other twenty men at arms, John Joce, knight, being the twentieth, and twenty more archers, to stay in his company upon the safe custody until the feast of All Saints; to be paid by the receiver of that castle and lordship wages for the whole forty of each class and also his own fee (regardum) as limited in the indenture between the late king and him.

1377

(Exchequer K.R. Acct., Bdle 34, No 29).

The bundle includes the following three documents:

1] Particulars of the account of Degary Seys, kt., late keeper of the king’s

castle of Pembroke, namely , of the receipts, wages, and rewards of nineteen men at arms and twenty archers (sagit) remaining with him in the castle of Pembroke, for the safe custody of it and the adjacent districts of Wales in the time of King Edward, grandfather of the present king, by virtue of an indenture dated 8 April 51 Edward III (1377), and also of two knights and 48 esquires, 50 men at arms, and fifty bowmen, fully equipped according to their order and rank kept in the retinue over and above the aforesaid 20 men at arms and twenty bowmen as specified n the aforesaid indenture for the safe custody of the said parts of Wales, by virtue of an indenture dated 13 July 1 Richard II 1377).

The said Degary, keeper of the castle of Pembroke, charges himself with £201 13s 6d. coming from the castle and county of Pembroke, etc., which were expended upon the above retinue, etc.,

Also £462 15d received of which £346 8s were expended on the above from 13 July to 20 October 1377.

2] Indentures re the above.

3] a] Roll of the names of the men at arms and bowmen of the Retinue of Degary Seys, staying in the king’s service in Wales from 21 July, 1 Richard II, to 20 October next following by virtue of an indenture dated 13 July, 1 Richard II (1377).

b] Do. staying in the castle of Pembroke in the service of Edward IV, for the safe custody of the castle from 6 May, 51 Edward IV (1377), next following as by indenture dated 8 April 51 Edward IV.

1377 July 13

(Harl. Ch 56 B 6).

Indenture dated 13 July, 1 Richard II, between the King and Desgarry Seys. "chivaler", by which the latter undertakes to stay in Wales for a quarter of a year with 50 men at arms and 50 archers suitably armed, over and above the 20 men at arms and 20 archers ordained before the stay of the said Desgarry in the garrison of the castle of Pembroke; and will provide for the said 50 men at arms ie besides himself two chevalers and 48 esquires, and also for the said 50 archers, the usual war wages, the same to be paid the day they arrive in the aforesaid parts. And the said Desgarry undertakes to stay for the said period in the county of Pembroke to do all he can with the said men for the defence of the said county and the district around against the invasion of the enemy

[Seal (of Desgarry) with arms pendant].

1377 July 28 Westminster

(Patent Roll, Richard II pt1 m 18 (Cal p 15)).

Appointment of Rees ap Griffith, knight, to keep the coasts of Milford and other coasts of South Wales against hostile invasion (Foedera ).

1378 February 6 Westminster

TRANSLATION OF THE CHARTER OF RICHARD II TO PEMBROKE

exhibited at the Council Chamber, Pembroke. 30/8/35

by A.J.Williams, M.A. LL.B.

Richard, by the grace of God, King of England and France, and Lord of Ireland too, all to whom these present letters shall come, greeting.

We have inspected the letters, patent and exemplification, under the seal of the late Father, Adam, Bishop of Menevia, lately made in these words:

Adam, by divine permission, Bishop of Menevia, to all to whom the present letters shall come, greetings, and the permanent memory of these exploits. We deem it worthy and an acceptable work to God, and we trust to do a profitable service, if through us the noble exploits of Kings, and things particularly useful to the condition of our Diocese, which have long been buried in oblivion, be discovered and brought to light by the aid of our pen. We have discovered in our Treasury, and among the archives of our Church of Menevia, among other old records in an ancient book, the perfect tenours of charters of the old text, free from all faults and suspicions, granted by Henry of renowned memory, late King of England, Duke of Aquitain and Count of Anjou, to the town and burgesses of Pembroke and Haverford. The tenour of this Charter is a grant to the town and Burgesses of Pembroke, with a rubic of that kind written in red ink, "The Charter of Pembroke, word for word, with nothing added or taken away, is known to be on this wise".

Henry, by the grace of God, King of England, Duke of Normandy and Aquitaine and Count of Anjou, to the Archbishops, Bishops, Abbots, Earls and Justices, Barons and Sheriffs, and to all his faithful people of all England, Wales, Ireland, Normandy, Brittany, Anjou, Poitou, Gascony, ant to all his men, whether dwelling on this side or beyond the sea, greeting. Know ye that I have given and granted, and by this my present Charter, have confirmed to my burgesses of Pembroke all their liberties, immunities and free customs as freely and fully as they had them in the time of King Henry, my grandfather.

Wherefore, I will and firmly enjoin that all persons who shall enter the port of Milford with merchandise, whether they wish to buy or sell on the land, shall come to the bridge of Pembroke and sell and buy there. Or, if they wish otherwise, let them do business at the Cross, discharging their lawful customs; and that all merchandise which is bought in the County of Pembroke to be carried into England, ought to be shipped at the bridge at Pembroke, paying their customs; and that all persons who come to my market at Pembroke, shall have the security of my peace from the ford of Landfey and from Stentbrigge, and from the Great Ditch at Pencoyt and from the Passage from the hour of nine on the Sabbath to sunset on Monday, if they do not break my peace.

I also command that if any of my burgesses of the said town, for one year and a day shall hold house or lands which belong to the said town, without reproach, and anyone shall afterwards claim right, let him not have it if he shall have in the meantime remained in my kingdom.

If any man of whatsoever place remain in the same town for a year and a day, without reproach, whether he be a freeman or a serf, he shall ever after remain my freeman and a burgess of the same town.

And, when a burgess of the said town, by whatsoever death and in whatsoever place, dies on land or sea with a will or without a will, his heir shall have all his goods by payment of a relief of twelve pence.

I also grant that the burgesses of the said town shall have grazing rights in my forest of Nerbart and Coytrath, and timber rights in the same town by permission of the forester, and they may take decayed wood to burn wheresoever they shall find it; and if they shall have swine in my forests, they shall be acquitted of pannage.

I also will and command that those things which the aforesaid burgesses shall perform in the said town, if the debtors are willing to render in the same town, they may take their pledge (Cattle). But, if it shall happen that my said burgesses ought to go into our army, the safe keeping of my town being in the hands of their warden, let them go with my bailiff, so that they may return at night. But if the army be raised by their warden, so that the merchants may serve me at my camp, the custody of the town being safe, they shall go.

Whatsoever merchandise any of my aforesaid burgesses shall buy, if anyone shall claim the same as stolen, he shall acquit himself by oath and by his witnesses, and he shall lose the same chattel and what he gave for it.

Also, my aforesaid burgesses shall answer no plaint out of their hundred unless it be that which pertains to the royal crown. Their forfeiture in the hundred and shire court is twelve pence.

All the merchants of the County of Pembroke, by the appointment of the warden of the burgesses, shall come to their merchant guild.

I also will and grant, and firmly enjoin that the same burgesses shall have the aforesaid liberties and their customs well, quietly and freely, with the addition of their other liberties and customs which they still remember.

Know ye, furthermore, that I have given and granted, and by this, my present charter, confirm to the same my burgesses acquittance from toll, pontage and havenage, and from all customs whatsoever at Bristol, Gloucester, Winchester, Devon, Cornwall, Rochelle, Normandy and throughout all my lands in commotes, in burgages, in castles, in towns, in fairs and markets, in uplands, in woods, in plain, in roads, in lands, in waters and in all other places. I also forbid anyone to do injury to them in the matters which I have granted to them, and by this my present charter, have confirmed; nor shall anyone draw them into pleas concerning the liberty and acquittance granted to them under forfeiture of fifty pounds sterling.

Furthermore, be it Known to you that I have given and granted to the same, my burgesses of Pembroke, a fair of eight days at the feast of the Apostles, Peter and Paul, and to all coming to the same, my firm peace, those being excepted who have forfeited my peace, and they shall have the same liberties and customs at the fair as they have at my market in the same town on Sunday.

And if any heir is such, (ie. in respect of his youth), that he cannot hold and defend his land, if the burgess who has died left a will, let his heir and the inheritance remain the custody to which he, on his death bed, committed him. But, if he shall not have left a will, then the heir and inheritance, by the advise and consent of the nearest relatives, being my burgesses, shall remain in the custody of any one of his friends. In witness of the foregoing, we have ordered our seal to be hereto attached.

Given in our manor of Landfey, the seventh day of the month of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand three hundred and sixty eight, and in the eighth year of our consecration.

We, (ie. Richard II), therefore having perused the tenour of the exemplification of the said letters of the aforesaid Bishop, at the request made to us by the Burgesses of Pembroke, the tenour of these presents we have made to be exemplified. In witness wherefore we have caused these, our letters, to be made patent. Witness ourselves at Westminster on the sixth day of the month of February in the first year of our reign.

1378 March 3 Westminster

(Patent Roll, 1 Richard II pt 4 m 37 (Cal p.133)).

Commission to David Craddok and to Walter Mille, as justices for holding the Sessions in the County of Pembroke.

1378 May 20 Westminster

(Patent Roll 1 Richard II pt 6 m 31 (Cal p 215)).

Pardon to Nicholas de Audeley, knight, lord of Kemmoys, William Podmore, his servant, and others his servants, for a fine of £25., made with the king in the county of Pembroke (which county is now for certain reasons in the king’s hands), of all the felonies, homicides, arsons, robberies, treasons, usurption of royal jurisdiction, and seditions of which they were guilty previous to 1 March, within the lordship of Kemmoys or county of Pembroke, contrary to the form of a composition made between William de Valencia, formerly earl of Pembroke, and William Martyn, then lord of Kemmoys, whose estate is now in the said Nicholas, which composition was affirmed by A., bishop of St David’s chancellor, and others of the Council; and of outlawry, if any, therefor.

Vacated because surrendered and otherwise enrolled in the year 2 Richard II.

1378 July 12 Westminster

(Patent Roll 2 Richard II pt 1, m 44 (Cal p. 261)).

Pardon, for a fine of £25 paid in the hanaper by Nicholas de Audeley, knight, lord of Kemmoys, to the said Nicholas and William Podmore, his servants, and to all his other servants, of all that pertains to the king or to the earls of Pembroke for whatever they did before Michaelmas within the land, lordship or liberty of Kemmoys or county of Pembroke, contrary to the form of agreement between William de Valencia, some time earl of Pembroke, and William Martyn, then lord of Kemmoys (whose estate the said Nicholas now has) in the use and exercise of divers jurisdictions and liberties belonging thereto, which agreement was affirmed by A. bishop of St David’s chancellor, and others of the Council.

1379 March 4 Westminster

(Patent Roll, 2 Richard II pt 2 m 29 (Cal p. 327)).

Pardon, at the supplication of Guy de Bryan, to Richard Howell for the death of John Chepman of Penbrok.

1379 May 17 Westminster

(Patent Roll 2 Richard II pt 2 m 15 (Cal p. 344)).

Pardon, at the supplication of Guy de Bryene, to William Wyryot for the death of John Chepman of Penbrok, killed on Saturday the eve of St Andrew’s, 50 Edward III.

1380 April 20 Westminster

(Patent Roll, 3 Richard II, pt 3 m 23d (Cal p. 509)).

Commission to Guy de Briene, John Joce, knight, Walter Mille, Matthew Wogan, John Hoton, Henry Shirmyn, William Malenfaunt, Richard Huskard, Richard Wyryot, Peter Jurdan, John Wydlok, Philip Sutton, John Laurence, Thomas Joffe, Richard Howell, John Howell, Griffin ap Eynon, Richard Gourda, the mayor and commonalty of Kermendyn, to arrest and to bring to Pembroke Castle William Wyriot, who maintains a band of malefactors, and to imprison him there unless he find mainpernors in £500.

1380 May 3 Westminster

(Patent Roll 3 Richard II pt 3 m 17d (Cal p. 511)).

Commission to Richard Tresilian and David Hannemere to enquire touching a complaint by William de Bello Campo, who holds a farm the county of Pembroke, late of John de Hastynges, earl of Pembroke, deceased, tenant in chief, in the king’s hands by reason of the minority of the heir, that when Walter Mille, who supplies his place in the country, and is sheriff and judge there, was returning from London, whither he had been on business connected with the country to take advice of the king’s justices, among other things, touching a suit brought by Robert Corbet against William Wiryot, concerning lands in the county, Richard Howell, kinsman of the said William Wiryot, William Spykyng and others lay in ambush and assaulted him and his servants at Egelton, co. Hereford, and carried away goods, commissions, letters of presentation of Henry del See, one of the clerks in Chancery, directed to the Bishop of St David’s, charters, writings and other muniments.

1380 December 20 Westminster

(Patent Roll 4 Richard II pt 2 M 33 (Cal p. 583)).

Protection, until quinzaine of Easter, for William Wiryot, of the county of Pembroke, on his complaint that he goes in fear on account of the rancour of certain of the king’s officers, and has fled to England, Guy de Bryen, the elder, knight, John Erlee, John Kentcombe, of the counties of Somerset and Dorset, and Richard Howell of Wales, have become his mainpernors.

1381 August 24 Eltham Manor

Pardon to the king’s brother, John de Holand, for having occupied certain lands of the yearly value of £60, in the county of Pembroke, in Wales (lately held by Rees ap Griffith, deceased, by courtesy of the inheritance of Joan, daughter and heiress of Isabelle, by his wife) during the minority of the said Joan, by colour of letters patent of the king granting to him the custody of the lands, late of the said Rees, tenant in chief, during the minority of his heir.

1386 May 15 Westminster

(Patent Roll 9 Richard II pt 2 m 12 (Cal p. 146)).

Grant to Alice de Wyndesore of all the fines and reliefs belonging to the king from the castle of Maynorbyre, co. Pembroke, which county is in the king’s hands by reason of the minority of the heir of John de Hastynges, late earl of Pembroke, tenant in chief, and of whatever belongs to the king on account of any alienations from the castle and of any entries thereon by William de Wyndesore or any other person, and grant that if any part thereof has been levied by the king’s ministers of Pembroke to the use of anyone but the king it be delivered to her as the king’s gift, provided that the full yearly farm of the lordship of Pembroke, without any diminutions, be duly accounted for during the minority of the heir.

1386 September 18 Westminster

(Patent Roll 10 Richard II pt 1 m 31 (Cal p. 210)).

Protection with clause volumus for the year to John Porter, clerk of the county of Pembroke, going to Ireland on the king’s service in the company of John de Stanley, kt. supplying the place of Robert, marquess of Dublin.

1386 Tenby

(Inquisitions Miscellaneous Chancery File 237). (Old ref IPM, 10 Richard II, No 131).

Inquisition taken at the town of Tenby in Wales, which is a member and parcel of the county (comitatus) of Pembroke in the said county, Saturday: Morrow of St Matthew, Apostle and Evangelist, 10 Richard II, before William Gwyn, William Barwell, king’s escheator(sic) , in the county of Hereford and the March of Wales.

Jurors: William Pecock, Thomas Lonv, John Wysman, Richard Palmere, Thomas White, John Campylon, Thomas Newe, Robert Helyere, David Theo, John Pollard, Philip Lange, and Walter Nicholl, men of the said town of Tenby and neighbourhood. Who say that since the king by his letters patent dated 9 March 1 Richard II, granted to William Beauchamp, kt., the custody of the castle and county of Pembroke, among other premises, by reason of the minority of John, son and heir of John Hastings, late Earl of Pembroke, much damage has been done to the castle and town of Tenby, namely, the wall of the castle, during the said William’s custody, through want of repair has partly fallen, damage 20s; the chamber called Loedyschamber in the said castle, through want of roofing, has damaged to the extent of 8 marks; the iron bars of the window of the chancery (fenestre cancelle) in the castle were removed and destroyed, loss 12d; the lead covering the chamber over the castle gate is decayed and rotted to the extent of 33s 4d; a certain Pentys over the Castle Gate, and the house of the horse mill (molendini equinii) through defective roofing during the said period has decayed to the extent of 10s 8d; the gates of the castle, and one Tripget made for the defence of the castle, through want of repair, decayed to the extent of £4 13s 4d; two messuages held by John Michiel, through want of roofing decayed to the extent of 100s; messuage held at will by Richard Smyth in Boldeswallis in the town of Tenby decayed etc., 40s; a windmill over Magdalene’s house through want of repair decayed etc., 7s 3d; do. a messuage in the town of Tenby where David Baugh used to live, through defective roofing etc., 5s. A messuage called Boldeshous, through want of repair 20s; a messuage lately held by William Coffyn in Ffrogmorestrete in the said town, through defective roofing 3s 4d; all which destructions and damage took place during the custody of the said William Beauchamp, by himself and his ministers to the manifest contempt and prejudice of our lord the king.

St Florence: Inquisition taken at Pembroke (same date as above) before Hugh Yonge, King’s Chamberlain of South Wales, Lewis ap Oweyn, William Gwyn, William Barwell (king’s escheator co Hereford)

Jurors: William Whyte, William Stethe, David Russell, David Mannyng, John Harry, John Morys, Stephen Robyn, William Lourence, William Elyot, John Wysman, Philip Mulward and Howell ap llewelyn, men of the neighbourhood of Maynorbir, which is a member and parcel of the said county of Pembroke.

Who say, etc., much damage has been done in the vill of St Florence within the neighbourhood of Maynorbir, namely, one house in the manor there called Deyehous, to the extent of 66s 8d; the shepherd’s house in the said manor do. 60s; 60 big oaks in the park there cut down and sold, value £18; the underwood et seedlings (germina) of the wood there of recent growth (de novo crescene) through lack of custody and enclosure, £18; the said park on the day of William’s appointment was enclosed on all sides by a stone wall 8 feet high, being 1000 perches long and more, each perch containing 18ft, price per perch 18d. Sum £41 13s 4d, which wall is now entirely fallen down and destroyed, all of which destructions, etc. were perputrated by the said William and his ministers to the manifest prejudice and contempt of our said lord and king.

Coydrath: Inquisition taken at Pembroke (same date as above) before (as above, St Florence).

Jurors: John Castelmartin, Thomas Perrot, John Willy Hammond, John Moryce, Henry Llewelyn, Ieuan Cawerda, David Davy, John waltier, John Harold, Ieuan ap Gwyllym Gough, Lewis ap Madoc, men of the neighbourhood of Coydrath. Who say, etc., much damage has been done in the vill of Coydrath, namely, a messuage lately belonging to David Elyot, entirely destroyed, 40s; 3000 green oaks in the woods of Coydrath and Rodewode, worth 200 marks, cut down and sold, the underwood there decayed through lack of custody and enclosure, 20 marks, all which damage, etc., as above, etc., to the prejudice of our lord the king.

Castlemartyn: Inquisition taken at Pembroke, etc., as Coydrath above. Jurors: Richard Crippyn, William Griffyth of Trewent, Stephen Lucery, Lawrence Bron, Richard Ffroyn, Stephen Brugge, John Adam, John Knelhel, Gilbert Lucery, John Lowlyn, Henry Dobyn and John Werrot, men of the neighbourhood of Stakpole. Who say much damage has been done in the manor of Castle Martin in the neighbourhood of Stakpole aforesaid, namely the doors and windows of the Hall of the said manor destroyed to the value of 40s.; the posts, beams, spars and the walls of the said Hall, through defective roofing have rotted, £8; the doors, glass windows and iron bars (fenestre vitri et vect’ferree) in the rooms annexed to the said hall both at the upper and lower end of the said hall (tam in superiori quam inferiori fine eiusdem aule) are damaged and 20s; the beams boards (tabule), posts and spars in the said rooms, through defective roofing, etc., £9.; the doors and windows in the pantry, buttery, and kitchen of the said manor are decayed to the extent of 40s; also the walls, posts, beams, "rastrees", and spars in the said pantry, etc., through defective roofing, etc., £8.; when the said William was appointed he received a rabbit warren stocked with rabbits, worth, besides reprisals, 60s. yearly, now it is worthless, damage £30.; all of which destructions, etc, as above.

Castle and Town of Pembroke: Inquisition taken at Pembroke, as last above. Jurors: John Castell, John Pricel, Geoffrey Mathew, Robert Kylton, John Harry, Walter Keynyn, John Hurde, John Kyng of Eston, William Fforster, senior (?), Richard, son of John Meryan, Henry Methelan, men of the county of Pembroke. Who say that much damage, etc., in the castle and town of Pembroke, namely, the doors and windows of the Hall in the said castle of Pembroke 100s.; the posts beams and spars in the said hall through defective roofing rotted by the rain £40; in a certain room at the upper end of the said hall, glass, doors, windows and iron bars (vectes ferrar) destroyed, 40s; beams posts and boards, and spars therein through defective roofing, £13 6s 8d; in a certain other room on the back end of the said hall and in a certain other room called Wythdrawyng chamber attached to it through lack of repair, £10; joists, boards, beams and spars in the same, through defective roofing, etc., £40.; doors and windows decayed in the pantry, buttery and kitchen there, 100s.; beams, posts and spars in the same destroyed by rain, etc., £50; windows, glass, iron bars (vectes ferras’), stall, and diverse chapel ornaments in the chapel there destroyed and carried away, £13 6s 8d.; doors and windows in the stable there 6s 8d.; posts rastrees, spars and walls in the said stable, by rain etc £24 (?); timber (britagia de meremio) for the protection of the walls of the said castle, built on the walls of the said castle and bow’es and tabule kernall of the said castle destroyed etc., £40; two bridges of the castle there, one called Northbrigge and the other Southbrigge, decayed through want of repair, 100s; a new house in the town of Pembrok called "Christeine Saundre", worth 40s., entirely decayed through defective roofing; in the said castle a (cunuculare) rabbit warren stocked, worth 10s yearly, is now worthless, loss £10; armour for 40 men delivered to the said William by Thomas More, late Receiver of the said castle on behalf of the king, namely coats of mail (lorice) .....plates, bassynettis with aventails, "gloves de plate", "legh. .....", "vambras" and "rerebas" now decayed and only worth about 22s; also there were there 100 bows called. ....bows, 100. ...., 12 bows called "crossbowes", 6 boues de Brake. .... (defective) .... all which depredations, etc., as above.

1388 March 5 Westminster

Revocation of protection with cause volumus for one year...

Revocation of the like granted 1 June last to David ap Ponteyn of the county of Kermerdyn, as going on the king’s service beyond seas with William de Bello Campo, captain of Calais, because he tarries in the county of Pembroke on his own affairs.

1389

LAPSE OF OLD EARLDOM.


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