JOTTINGS and HISTORICAL RECORDS

on the

HISTORY

of

SOUTH PEMBROKESHIRE

Vol 3

1389 Ė 1535

Compiled by

B.H.J. HUGHES

INTRODUCTION

During my research into the history of the Castlemartin Hundred I have come upon much information contained in books of old Documents.

(c) B.H.J. Hughes 2000

Notice

I, B.H.J. Hughes, hereby assert and give notice of my right under section 77 of the Copyright, designs and Patents Act 1988 to be identified as the author of this booklet.

Published by B.H.J. Hughes PENNAR PUBLICATIONS.

ISBN 1 898687 08 0

British Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data.

A Catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library.

Return to Research Topics


 

1389 LAPSE OF OLD EARLDOM.

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1389 - 1399.

Richard II held Pembroke Castle (Keeper 1389-1390 was Richard Howell).

1389, February 17. (CPR., i, p. 164.)

On February, 1389, one Thomas Fort was pardoned for revealing the secrets of the castles of Tenby, Pembroke, etc.

1390-1396 Keeper of Pembroke Castle was John Golofre.

1390, January 2. (PATENT ROLL, 13 Richard II . 2, pt. 22 (Cal., p. 272).)

Grant for life, to Thomas Hamme, one of the butlers of the cellar within the king's household, of the office of constable of-the castle of Tynbybll, co. Pembroke, Wales, provided that office is not one of the offices excepted by ordinance of the Great Council. By p. s.

1390, February 16. (PATENT ROLL, 3 Richard II, pt. 8 (Cal., p.193).)

Appointment, during pleasure, of Richard Howell to the keeping of the County of Pembroke - by bill of treasurer.

1390, August 12. (PATENT ROLL, 3 Richard II, pt. I 26 (Cal., 297).)

Grant, for life, to the king's knight, John Golafre, at the yearly rent of 600 marks, of all the lands and tenements in the county of Pembroke in the king's hand by the death of John de Hastynges, earl of Pembroke, and lately demised to William de Beauchamp for 500 marks a year.

Vacated because otherwise below.

By p. s. [6518].

1390, July 28.

Grant, for life, to the same, of the office of constable of Pembroke castle.

1390.

On September 16 in this year, John Golafre was appointed keeper of the castle and county of Pembroke, the commotes of Oystrekowe, Seint Clere and Trallarn and Kilgarran.

CL C.P.R ii, p27.

1394, 8 September, Cardiff. (PATENT ROLL 18 Richard II, pt. 1, n. 22 (Cal, p. 483).)

Protection, with clause volumus, for half a year for William Barlow of Teneby, going to Ireland in the king's company on his service there.

By bill of p s.

1396.

King Richard presented the Earldom and Palatinate of Pembroke to his wife Isabel. Sir Thomas Percy Earl of Worcester administered it for her.

1396, November 28. (PATENT ROLL, 20 Richard II, p1 m11 (Cal, p. 36).)

Grant, for life, to William Lescrope, of the keeping of the castle of Pembrok, South Wales, receiving therefor £100 a year from the issues of the county of Pembroke.

1396, December 8. (PATENT ROLL, 20 Richard II, pt I, 1X. 8 (C4 l., p. 40).)

Grant of the castle, county and lordship of Pembroke, the castle and town of Tenby, and the commotes of Oysterlowe, Saint Clere, and Trahayn, to Isabel, Queen of England, etc., of Kilgarran.

1397, February 14.

To the reverend father in Christ and lord, lord bishop Guy by the grace of God bishop of St. Davids, John Hyot, canon of your church of St. Davids, sendeth obedience and reverence due to so great a father, with honour.

We received with becoming reverence on 15 March in the year of the Lord written below, letters of your commission presented to us by the party of the discreet man Master Thomas Picton, rector of the parish church of Tynbegh, of your diocese in these words:-

Guy, by divine permission, bishop of St. Davids, to our beloved sons in Christ, Masters Griffin Yonge, our vicar general in spiritualities, John Hyot, canon of the church of St.Davids, John Blakeman and Philip Penkayr, bachelor of Law greeting, grace and benediction.

To have cognisance and proceed in a cause of an appeal for the party of our beloved son Thomas Picton, rector of the parish church of Tynbegh and warden or rector of the free chapel of Oggeston, of our diocese, by occasion of the pronouncement of a decree and the removal, both as is suggested, unjust, by which one William Skyll, clerk, pretended commissary, pretending himself to be commissary of John, late bishop of St. Davids, our immediate predecessor, removed Thomas Picton himself from the said church by his pretended definitive sentence passed by him, pretended Commissary and decreed that Thomas himself should be removed from the same church and the possession of it, and removed him, as is suggested, unjustly, and of other grievances contained in the said appeal interjected or interposed to us, and to hear, discuss and determine by a due end the cause of the appeal itself, and the principal matter of the same, with all things incident to, dependent on, arising out of and connected with, it, summoning in this behalf those who should be summed to you, in whose faithfulness and industry we have special trust in the Lord, jointly, and to each one of you, severally, we commit our powers, together with the power of every canonical coercion whatsoever and of executing the things which you shall decree in this behalf, commanding you or that one of you who shall execute our present mandate that of all your process had before you and by you or any of you upon the premises, when it shall be ended, you or that one of you certify us/ when you or he shall be required by the party of the said Sir Thomas, by your or his letters containing the series of these and of such process, sealed with an authentic seal; or by a public instrument.

Dated in our inn at the Strand by London, 14 February, 1397-8, the first year of our consecration.

These letters indeed having been presented to us, as is aforesaid, and viewed and understood by us, the party of the aforesaid Master Thomas required of us with instance, that we consent to admit the burden of the said commission upon us and do full justice for the same in this behalf- we verily wishing to be obedient to your mandates, as we are bound, admitted the burden of the same commission upon us, and immediately afterwards. at the instance of the party of the said Master Thomas, decreed that William Skyll and John Pekke, touching whom there is a caution in the said letters, should be peremptorily called forth at a certain suitable day and place to proceed and view the proceedings in the cause of the appeal and the principal matter, of which it is more fully contained in the said letters of commission. At which day and place indeed the party of the said Master Thomas appeared judicially before us by John Picton, his proctor Sufficiently constituted in this behalf, exhibiting his procuration the tenour of which is written out below, and exhibited there a certificate sealed with the seal of the dean of the deanery of Pembroke, by which certificate, indeed, read through in this behalf, it clearly appeared that the aforesaid William Skyll and John Pekke had been diligently sought for by your mandatary in that behalf and had not been found, whereof in a libel brought before us for the party of the said Master Thomas the tenour of which is this:-

In the name of God, Amen.

Before you, the venerable man, Master John Hyot, canon of St. Davids, commissary specially deputed of the reverend father in Christ and lord, lord Guy, by the grace of God bishop of St. Davids, in a cause and matter between the parties written below, the party of Master Thomas Picton, rector of the parish church of Tynbegh of the diocese of St. Davids, against John Pekke, self-styled rector of the said church of Tynbegh, and against every person whatsoever legally competent in judgement for the same, says and propounds in law that one William Skyll, clerk, pretending himself at the instance of John Pekke, clerk, of the diocese of Worcester, to be commissary of lord John of good memory, by the grace of God bishop of St. Davids, having no jurisdiction, authority, or any other legitimate power in this behalf asserting and pretending, although untruly, that the said church of Tynbegh and free chapel of Oggeston were and are benefices incapable of being held together, when they were not and are not so, and that Thomas himself had held and occupied the same church and chapel at the same time, being incapable of being held together, for no small time contrary to the canonical sanctions, when he has not so held or occupied them, pronounced Thomas himself, the rector and warden aforesaid in a pretended matter of pretended jurisdiction of and upon a pretended vacancy of the said church of Tynbegh which it was pretended was pending before him, as well of his pretended office as at the instance and prompting of John Pekke, asserting that he himself had been presented to the said church of Tynbegh, to be contumacious, when he was not; and in penalty of such fictitious contumacy removed, as is said, the aforesaid Thomas Picton from the said church of Tynbegh and its possession by his pretended definitive sentence which delivered as is asserted, in writing and published, the said Thomas Picton not having been summoned to this nor warned in way whatever, but being absent not by contumacy, with the cognisance of the cause and the order of law required by law in that behalf entirely omitted, without any reasonable or lawful be whatever, in fact since of right he could not, and decreed that had been and was removed, and also admitted the aforesaid John Pekke to the said church of Tynbegh in the person of Thomas Coffe, clerk of the same John Pekke, his pretended proctor, and Thomas himself in the name of the said John Pekke , also in fact since of right he could not and instituted him as rector, as is said, in the same, [and] commanded and caused the said John Pekke in the person of his said pretended proctor and the same his pretended proctor for him and in his name to be inducted, as is said, into corporal possession of the said church of Tynbegh and the rights and appurtenances of the same, in all things unjustly, to the prejudice and grievance of Thomas himself, the rector and warden aforesaid, whereof on behalf of the said Thomas, feeling himself unduly harassed by the grievances set forth and every one of them it was lawfully appealed to the reverend father in Christ lord Guy, by the grace of God bishop of St. Davids, and to his audience: wherefore, when what should be proved in this behalf has been proved, or when by any other way of law whatsoever in that behalf those things or any of them which in the premises ought to be discovered or declared in this behalf have been discovered or declared, the party of the said Master Thomas, the rector aforesaid, prays by the voice of such appeal that it be pronounced, decreed and declared, that his cause or . . . and the appeal itself was and is lawful and interposed for true, just and lawful causes . . . and that when the injustices of the said pretended definitive sentence and of the process had, as it is pretended, have been decreed and declared, that the pretended sentence itself was and is in law null and invalid, and so far as it has proceeded in fact it and whatever followed from the sentence or from the process, be quashed, made void and annulled, and the right and title of the said Master Thomas which he had and has in the same be confirmed; also that it be decreed and declared by you and your definitive sentences Sir judge aforesaid! and that there be further done, determined and decreed in the premises and in all things whatsoever relating to them, what is just, the aforesaid party of the said Master Thomas, jointly and severally, saving always in all things the benefit of law, puts forward and prays may be done. at the instance of the same party, we caused and decreed by the ways and means and by an edict of public citation the aforesaid William Skyll and John Pekke to be called forth before us at a certain suitable day and place, to answer to the same libel to be published to the same in a certificate in this behalf, and also to all and singular the acts in the cause and matter down to the definitive sentence inclusive. At which day and place the party of the aforesaid Master Thomas as above, appeared before us judicially and exhibited a certificate of the dean of the deanery of Pembroke, our mandatary in this behalf, sealed with the seal of office of the same, by which it appeared that the said Williams Skyll and John Pekke had been sufficiently and peremptorily cited in the parish church of Tynbygh, upon which the lawsuit is moved, and in the cathedral church of St. Davids, by an edict of public citation, whom, after they had been called by the crier, long time waited for and in no wise appeared, we at the instance of the party of the said Master Thomas pronounced to be contumacious, and we decreed was justice required, that we should proceed in the said cause and matter to all and singular the acts down to the definitive sentence inclusive, and at length after that pronouncement had been made by us for our jurisdiction in this behalf and for the voice of the appeal aforesaid, the lawful terms and postponements and the order of law required in such a cause and matter having been observed by us in all things, we proceeded to the passing of the definitive sentence in the said cause and matter in this manner.

In the name God, Amen!

On a more perfect understanding by us John Hyot, canon of St. Davids, commissary of the reverend father: Christ and lord, lord Guy, by the grace of God bishop of St. Davids, specially deputed in the cause and matter and between the parties underwritten, of the merits and circumstances of the cause of an appeal and the principal matter which before us between Master Thomas Picton, the party appealing and plaintiff of the one party, and John Pekke, the party appealed an respondent of the other, of and upon the right of the parish Church of Tynbegh of the diocese of St. Davids, and by occasion of it, was for a long time in dispute, and after that these themselves had been diligently pondered on and [examined], the terms and postponements in that behalf required by law having in all thing been observed, because by the acts, deduced, proved and confessed and other legal documents, we have found that the party of the said Master Thomas Picton has sufficiently full established and proved its contention, drawn up in a libel judicially corrected before us, of which libel the tenour is.

In the name of God, Amen!

Before you the venerable Master John Hyot, canon of St. Davids etc. as above nothing effectual has been set forth or proved on the defence which can in any manner meet or weaken the cause of the said Master Thomas in this behalf, we, the commissary beforesaid, first calling on the name of Christ, God himself only before our eyes, by the counsel of men in the law, assessors with us in this behalf, quash, invalid annul, the definitive sentence of and upon the right of church of Tynbegh, of the diocese of St. Davids, and by occasion it, passed de facto for the party of John Pekke and the said Master Thomas by Master William Skyll, pre-commissary in that behalf, and whatever followed from it; and we pronounce, decree, and declare, by this our definitive sentence in these writings, that the sentence itself was and is null and invalid in law; and in favour of the canonical right and title of the said Master Thomas in the said church of Tynbegh. The tenours in truth of the appeal and procuration of which there is mention above follow in these words:

In the name of God, Amen!

By the present public instrument let it appear to all, evidently, that in the year of the Lord 1397, the sixth indiction, the ninth year of the pontificate of the most holy father in Christ and lord, our lord Boniface IX, by divine providence pope, the twelfth day of the month of November, in the church of St. Mary le Bow, London, in the presence of me, a notary public, and of the witnesses written below the discreet man Master Thomas Picton, rector, as he asserted, of the parish church of Tynbegh and warden or rector of the free chapel of Oggeston, of the diocese of St. Davids, personally constituted, made, read and interposed an appeal, and a petition for letters dimissory and a making of oath, together, drawn up in writing, and appealed and several times asked for letters dimissory and swore on the holy gospels of God, then there corporally touched by him, as is contained lower down, of which appeal and petition for letters dimissory and making of oath the tenour follows and is such:

In the name of God, Amen!

Before you, an authentic person, and the witnesses here present, I Thomas Picton, rector of the parish church of Tynbegh and warden or rector of the free chapel of Oggeston, of the diocese of St. Davids, say, allege and set forth in writing, that I had and have canonically obtained the said church and free chapel as benefices capable of being held together, and have possessed them so obtained, with all their rights and appurtenances, for no small time and possess them at present, and the said church and chapel have been and are benefices capable of being held together, canonically possessed and obtained as benefices capable of being held together, and as such have been and are called, held, had and reputed, and that the said chapel with another parochial church and with other similar churches and benefices with cures, and dignities, had been hitherto, as it still is, several times canonically possessed and held by some ecclesiastical persons as a benefice capable of being held with another and as such has been and is called, held, had and reputed from time and through time whereof the memory of man is not to the contrary, peacefully and quietly, until the time of the underwritten grievances, when one William Skyll pretending himself commissary of lord John of good memory, by the grace of God bishop of St. Davids (with certain other pretended colleagues of his), having no jurisdiction in this behalf, authority or any other lawful power, asserting and pretending, although untruly, that the said church and chapel were and are benefices incapable of being held together, when they were not and are not so, [and] that I Thomas for several years had held and occupied the same church and chapel, benefices incapable of being held together, at the same time, contrary to the canonical sanctions, when I have not so held nor occupied them, in a pretended matter of a pretended inquisition of and upon a pretended vacancy of the said church of Tynbegh which it was pretended was in dispute before him as well of his pretended office as at the instance and prompting of John Pekke, asserting that he had been presented to the said church of Tynbegh, pronounced me, Thomas Picton, contumacious, when I was [not], and as the penalty of such fictitious contumacy, removed me, Thomas Picton, as is said, from the said church and the possession of it, by his pretended definitive sentence which, as is asserted, he [delivered] and published in writing, I, Thomas Picton, not having been called to this or in any wise warned, but being absent, not through contumacy, the cognisance of the cause and the order of right in that behalf required by law having been altogether omitted, without any reasonable or lawful cause, in fact since of right he could not, and decreed that I had been and was removed, and also admitted to the said church of Tynbegh the aforesaid John Pekke in the person of Thomas Goff, clerk of the same John Pekke, his pretended proctor, and Thomas himself in the name of the said John Pekke, also in fact since of right he could not, and instituted him, as is said as rector in the same, and commanded and caused the said John Pekke in the person of his said pretended proctor, and the same his pretended proctor for him and in his name, to be inducted, as is said, into corporal possession of the said church of Tynbegh and the rights and appurtenances of the same in all things unjustly, to the prejudice and grievance of me, Thomas Picton, rector and warden aforesaid, whereof I, Thomas Picton aforesaid, feeling myself unduly aggrieved by the before mentioned grievances, all and singular and every one of them, from the grievances themselves, all and singular, and on account of them and the things which can be gathered from them and by occasion of them, appealing in these writings to the reverend father in Christ and lord, lord Guy, bishop of St. Davids, and the audience of himself, and I ask, once, twice and thrice, instantly, more instantly and most instantly, for letters dimissory for me to be granted, made and delivered, with effect. And I swear, on these holy gospels of God corporally touched by me, that I knew of the before mentioned grievances, all and singular, with certainty for the first time within ten days last past and not before, and that I know not where I can certainly find the aforesaid William Skyll, pretended commissary, pretended judge, from whom, or the said reverend father lord Guy, bishop of St. Davids, judge, to whom, it has been appealed in this behalf, to notify them or either of them of this appeal within the time limited for this by law, and I make a protest as is usual. These things were done, as they are written and recited above, under the year, indiction, pontificate, month, day and place aforesaid, there being present the discreet men Master Henry Davy, bachelor in laws, and Thomas Brykhull, clerk, of the dioceses of Lichfield and Lincoln, witnesses to the premises specially called and asked. Be it known to all men by the presents that I, Thomas Picton, rector of the parish church of Tynbegh and rector or warden of the free chapel of Oggeston, of the diocese of St. Davids, in all causes and matters relating to me, my person, lay state aforesaid, and my church as well as free chapel, aforesaid, moved or to be moved, before all judges, ordinaries, delegates, subdelegates, or their commissaries having any jurisdiction or nomination whatsoever, at days, hours, or places at which it shall happen that I be present or absent, make, ordain and constitute by these presents my beloved in Christ Sirs William Elyot, Robert Broun, chaplains, John Picton, John Laurans, and William Marchant, clerks, whether absent or present, jointly and severally, and each of them as the whole, so that there be not any better condition of occupation but that which one shall begin, any of them may freely prosecute by himself, take up in the middle also, and finish, to be my true and lawful proctors and special messengers, giving and granting to my same proctors and each one of them a general power and special mandate in the name of me, of my estate aforesaid and of the Church and chapel aforesaid, to act, defend, take exceptions, make replications, bring an action, set positions and articles, answer to positions and articles, make oath as well in respect of claim as of speaking the truth and any other kind of lawful sacrament whatsoever, on my soul; to demand, receive and obtain, simply and with cautionary reservation, entire reformation of my estate aforesaid and that of my church and chapel aforesaid, restitution of damages estimated, expenses and interest, as well as benefit of absolution or release from all sentences of suspension, excommunication and interdict whatever, to object crimes and defaults and answer any objected, to produce and exhibit witnesses, letters and instruments and all other kinds of proofs whatsoever, and disprove, challenge and appeal against those produced and exhibited on the other side, to notify challenges and appeals Which should be notified and prosecute the causes of these, and to ask and receive letters dimissory, to substitute another or other proctor or proctors in the place of them or of any one of them, to recall those substituted or to be substituted, from the same and resume the office of proctor to themselves as often as and when this shall seem to them or any one of them expedient, and to do, exercise and set forward all and singular other things which by a true and lawful proctor can be done or set forward, even though they require a more special warrant. For my said proctors [and] those substituted or to be substituted by the same, I verily promise and set forth cautions by these presents that what they do is held as ratified, any judgement is to be abided by and what is adjudged, paid, under the pledge and obligation of all my goods. In witness of which thing I have procured the seal of the reverend man the official of Sir archdeacon of London to be set to the presents. And we the official beforesaid at the special and personal request of the constituent have set the seal of our office to these presents.

Dated at London, 16 November, 1397.

All and singular which things we signify to your reverend paternity by these presents, with the seal of the official of St. Davids which at our request is appended to these presents and with the sign and subscription of Master Philip Pencair, notary public, and our scribe of the acts in this behalf. And we the official beforesaid, at the personal request of the commissary aforesaid, have set the seal of our officiality to these presents.

Dated so far as applies to the appending of the seal, 12 May, 1398.

The aforesaid sentence was read and delivered by the venerable man Master Hyot, commissary aforesaid, in the parish of St. Thomas, Haverford, on 10 May, 1398, in the sixth indiction, the ninth year of the pontificate of the most holy father in Christ and our lord, lord Boniface IX, by divine providence pope, in the presence of me Philip Pencaer, the notary public written before, and Sirs William Duy and James Tancard, priests, of the diocese of St. Davids, specially called and asked to be witnesses to the premises. And I, Philip Pencaer, clerk, of the diocese of St. Davids, notary public by apostolic and imperial authority, and scribe of the acts of the aforesaid cause, was present at the presentation of the aforesaid letters of commission, the request, the reception of the burden, the admission of the citations, decrees, letters of Certificate, the showing of the letters of procuration, the exhibition of the libel, the presenting of witnesses and the reception of muniments and the making and examination of oaths, the exhibition and examination of the title of the said Thomas Picton, the conclusion, the pronouncing of the definitive sentence, and all and singular the other premises, while they were done and acted so as aforesaid by the venerable man, Master John Hyot, commissary aforesaid and before him, under the years, indiction, pontificate, months, days and places aforesaid, together with the abovenamed witnesses and the other things contained in the judiciary process, and saw and heard them so done, and by command of the said Sir commissary reduced them into this public form; and being occupied elsewhere I caused them to be written by another, and being asked and requested, subscribed my name and signed them with my sign and subscription in testimony and faith of all the premises. I the notary abovesaid certify that the interlineation of the words 'ut supra' between the twenty-ninth and thirtieth lines from the beginning, 'dioc' between the last and the last line but one, and 'nonogesimo' over the word 'octano' in the last line, were made not with evil intent but by error of the scribe, P. PENCAER.

To all to whom the present letters shall come, Guy, by divine permission bishop of St. Davids, sendeth greeting in the Saviour of all men and that they give unhesitating credence to what is written below. Because it is a pious and meritorious thing to bear testimony to the truth we make known to your university by the tenour of these presents that although in a plea before the justices of our lord the king of the Common Bench of and upon the parish church of Tynbegh of our diocese, pending undiscussed between John Pekke, asserting that he is the king's presentee to the church aforesaid, the party prosecuting, of the one party, and our beloved son Master Thomas Picton, rector of the church aforesaid, the party defending, of the other party, it is contained among the other things that William Skyll, pretending that he was commissary of lord John of good memory, our predecessor, decreed and declared that the aforesaid church of Tynbegh was vacant and removed, as is pretended, Thomas Picton himself as an unlawful holder from the said church and the possession of it, and so the same church of Tynbegh was vacated in fact and still is vacant, as is asserted in the plea aforesaid, although falsely, by the party of the said John Pekke, we, nevertheless, having as pertained to us been truly informed touching the falsity of the said feigned and authority of the venerable father in Christ lord Edmund, by the grace of God bishop of Exeter, chancellor of England, and the whole council of our lord the king, appointed a certain day for the said Sir William Skyll, pretended commissary, to appear before the council itself and us at Westminster to answer upon the premises and the things relating to them; which Sir William Skyll, indeed, appearing in person before the said council of our aforesaid lord the king and us at such day and place appointed for him, and making oath before the council itself, and us on the holy gospels of God corporally touched by him to say the truth of and upon the premises and the things relating to them, induced not by force nor fear, or by fraud, but purely, spontaneously, simply and absolutely, said in virtue of the oath made by him that he never proceeded in any manner whatsoever against the said Thomas Picton by force of any pretended commission aforesaid, nor decreed that the aforesaid church of Tynbegh was vacant, or declared that the aforesaid Master Thomas is or was an unlawful holder of the said church of Tynbegh, or in any manner whatever removed the same Thomas Picton from the said church or the possession of it, nor did any other thing as in the plea aforesaid of John Pekke aforesaid has been set forth, but he said that the process on behalf of the said John Pekke in the plea alleged, if any such there was, was and is false, feigned and forged, lacking every primary element of truth. We, therefore, desiring to bring out into the light so great a falsehood, bring all and singular the premises and the falsehood itself of the said John Pekke and such pretended process to the knowledge of your university, and of those who now are or hereafter shall be interested, by our present letters patent which, as justice demanded, we have caused to be made thereof under our seal for the aforesaid Master Thomas Picton.

Dated in our inn at the Strand by London on the ó day of the month of ó, 1398, and the first year of our consecration.

1398, April 23. (PATENT ROLL, 21 Richard II, pt 3, m. 24 (Cal., p. 332).)

Pardon to Thomas Perret the elder, of the county of Pembroke, for all felonies except treason, murder, rape and common larceny.

1398.

Licence of non-residence.

On 1 May, in the year and place abovesaid, the bishop granted licence of non-residence for one year to Sirs Nigel Hornygton, rector of the parish church of Maynerbyr, John Gryffyt, rector of the parish church of Appulby, William Rychard, rector of the parish church of Llandeveroure, and John Hykdon, rector of the parish church of Freystrop, of his diocese, provided that they be in the service of the noble lord, lord William Scrope, earl of Wyltischire, for the same time. And they had letters in the usual form etc.

1389.

Licence of non-residence.

On 8 May, in the year and place abovesaid, the bishop granted to Sir David Ormond, rector of the parish church of Nerberth, of his diocese, licence of non-residence for one year, and of delivering his church to fit persons at farm, he applying himself to general study for the same time; and he had letters in the usual form.

1398, May 17. (PATENT ROLL, 21 Richard II, pt. 3, m. 18 (Cal., p. 342).)

Appointment, during pleasure, of John Perrot as steward of the barony of la Roche, which for certain reasons is in the king's hand.

The bill of treasurer. Appointment of the same as receiver of moneys due to the king within that barony, for which he is to account at the exchequer of Kermerdyn. By the same bill.

1398, Aug 6.

On 6 August, 1398, in his inn at the Strand, the Bishop, in consideration of charity, collated the perpetual vicarage of the parish church of Pennaly, of his collation and diocese, to Sir John Cork, chaplain; the latter took the oath of continual and personal residence in the same according to the form off the constitutions etc., and rendered canonical obedience; and it was written under the same date to the archdeacon of St. Davids for his induction.

1398, 10 September.

Also on 10 September in the year abovesaid at the castle of Lawaden the bishop admitted Henry Cottesmore, chaplain to the parish church of Dynas in Kemmes, vacant by the free resignation of Sir William Peek, last rector of the same, to which he has been presented by the noble lady, lady Elizabeth Daudelegh, true patroness of the church itself; and himself in the person of Richard Weryng, his proctor etc. instituted, etc. And it was written to the archdeacon of Cardigan or his official for his induction; under the same date.

1398, 10 September.

Also on the same day and in the same place, the bishop collated the perpetual vicarage of the parish of St Wynnoc, of his collation and diocese, to Sir Richard Reynesh etc. And it was written to the archdeacon of St. Davids for his induction, under the same date.

1398, 12 September.

Also on 12 September in the year abovesaid the rector of the parish church of Rodepakston obtained forty days of indulgence in aid of the repair and building of a bridge called Rebretgg and the chapel of the same and the hermitage: and that he might celebrate or have celebrations in the said chapel and in the chapel of St. Leonard, situated within the bounds and limits of his said parish; all the premises to endure for one year only. And he has the letters for this.

1398, 12 September.

Also on 12 September in the year abovesaid, the bishop in his manor at Llantfey admitted Sir Thomas Broun, chaplain to the perpetual vicarage of the parish church of CASTLEMARTYN, of his diocese, to which he was presented to him by our most excellent prince and lord, lord Richard, by the grace of God king of England etc., true patron of that vicarage, and instituted him etc.

1398, 17 November.

Guy etc to our beloved son Sir William Peek rector of the parish church of NEWPORT IN KEMMES, of our diocese, greeting etc.

We grant to thee special license to absent thyself from thy said church for one year continuously from the date of these presents and freely take and have the fruits, rents and profits of the same, attending in the meantime on the service of the noble lady, the lady of Audley, provided nevertheless, that thy same church be not defrauded in the meantime of the services due and that thou appoint a sufficient proctor in the same who can answer lawfully to us and our ministers and the rest of the ordinaries, in thy name, and that of the goods of the same church a proper portion be ministered to thy poor parishioners in thy absence, and that all and singular the charges incumbent on the same church be duly supported.

Dated under our seal in our inn at the Strand by London, 17 November, 1398, and the second year of our consecration.

1398, 17 November.

On the same day and at the same place, the bishop granted to Sir Henry Cottesmore, rector of the parish church of DYNAS IN KENIMES, license of non-residence for one year, he attending in the meantime in the service of the noble lady, the lady of Audley.

1399.

Henry IV held Pembroke Castle.

1399 March 24.

The bishop granted to Sir Nigel Hornyngton, rector of the parish church of MANERBYR, of his diocese, a licence of non-residence for one year, attending on the service of the noble Lord William Scrope, earl of Wiltshire, for the same time. And he had letters in the usual form.

1399, September 15.

Also on 15 September in the year abovesaid, the bishop at London granted to Sir David Ormond rector of the parish church of NERBERT, of his diocese licence of non-residence for one year, he being in the meantime in the service of the noble man Sir Edmund de Mortuo Mari.

1399, approx.

Henry IV restored the priory but it was seized again by the Crown.

Henry IV issued a writ of protection to Pembroke Priory.

(Episc. Acts pp. 247, 254, 255).

Henry by the grace of God king etc., to all whom the present letters shall come, greeting. Know that we inwardly considering how some alien priories, houses and religious places being within our realm of England and Wales were laudably founded and built by our noble progenitors and other nobles and magnates of our realm to do and maintain divine offices and works of hospitality and alms and other works of piety and devotion, and that the same priories and religious places, as well by sudden and frequent removals and expulsions of the priors and occupiers of the places aforesaid as by divers secular and other farmers after they were that they were first taken into the hand of Sir Edward, late king of England, our grandfather (Edward III), by occasion of the war between us and those of France, are so above measure destroyed, dilapidated and wasted as well in houses as in things and possessions that the divine worship and regular observances therein are at an end, and hospitalities and alms and other works of charity besides, of old established and accustomed to be done there are withdrawn , and also the pious vows of the founders are in manifold ways defrauded and frustrated to no small offence and displeasure of Almighty God, as we believe. And it being our will therefore to the glory of God and holy church to provide more graciously for the increase of divine worship and the renewal and continuance of the said works of charity and other works incumbent , we of our especial grace, of our certain knowledge and with the assent of our council in our present parliament have granted and by the tenour of these presents have restored to the abbot and convent of St Martin, Sees of the power of France, the advowsons of all their conventual and other priories to which priors have been accustomed of ancient time to be admitted, instituted and inducted, in our realm of England and elsewhere within our lordship and power being, and taken and seized into our hand by occasion of the war aforesaid, and we remove our hand from the advowsons aforesaid; to have and to hold to them and their successors, so that the same abbot and his successors aforesaid shall henceforth present fit persons to the priories aforesaid in all voidance of the same, the seisin thereof aforesaid or any other seisin in our hand or the hand of our aforesaid grandfather or of Richard, late king of England, by the occasion of the war aforesaid, made before these times , or any ordinances published to the contrary, notwithstanding; saving nevertheless to us and our heirs and other chief lords the services due therefrom, and further saving the right of any other person whatsoever. In witness etc. we have caused these our letters patent to be made.

Witness myself at Westminster, 15th November in the first year of our reign (1399). By K.

1399, November 21.

To the reverend etc Guy etc. his humble and devoted abbot and convent of the monastery of St. Martin, Sees, of the order of St. Benedict, send the reverence due to so great a father, with honour.

Whereas in the vacancy of our priory of St. Nicholas, Pembroke, of your diocese, by the death of brother John Galy late and immediately preceding prior of the priory mentioned, we have elected the religious and honest man brother Gervase le Brek, our fellow monk, and bearer of these same paternity to graciously deign to admit the same brother Gervase to the priory aforesaid and institute him as prior in the same and cause him to be inducted into corporal possession of the same priory with all its rights and appurtenances, and also to perform the rest of the things which are incumbent on your pastoral office. In witness whereof etc., we direct these our letters patent to your reverend paternity. Dated etc in our abbey, 21 November, 1399.

1399, November 26.

Guy etc to our beloved son in Christ, Gervas le Brok, monk of the order of St Benedict, priest expressly professed in the same order, greetings etc.

To the priory of St Nicholas, Pembroke, of our diocese, which is usually governed by a prior, immediately annexed to the monastery of St Martin, Seez of the same order, and a dependant of the same, now vacant, to which by the religious men the abbot and convent of Sees aforesaid, true patrons of that priory thou art presented to us, with licence for this first time asked and obtained from our most excellent prince and lord, lord Henry etc., illustrious king of England etc., all ordinances published to the contrary notwithstanding, we admit thee and we institute and invest thee as prior of the same priory of St Nicholas Dated at London 26th November 1399.

(There is a note that the same Gervase rendered canonical obedience, first abjuring all schismatical pravity).

1399, November 26.

Guy etc. To our beloved etc., the archdeacon of St Davidís, or his official, greetings etc. Because we have admitted etc., Dan Gervas le Brok, monk of the order of St Benedict, priest expressly professed in the same order, to the priory of St Nicholas, Pembroke, of our diocese, which is usually governed by a prior, immediately annexed to the monastery of St Martin, Seez of the same order, and a dependant of the same, now vacant, to you we commit and command that you induct the aforesaid Gervas etc. Assigned to the same stall in the choir and the place in the chapter which had been accustomed to be assigned to the priors of the said priory for the time being, enjoining nevertheless on all and singular the monks and ministers of the same priory that they be humbly and devoutly obedient and attendant to the same Gervase as the true prior of themselves and that priory, in those things which belong to the regular discipline , rule and governance of the same priory; restraining canonically gainsayers and rebels , if you find any in this behalf. And of what you do in the premises etc.

Dated London 26th November 1399.

1399, May 19. (PATENT ROLL, 22 Richard II, pt. 3, 18. 20 (Cal., p. 557).)

Pardon, on his petition, to Thomas Percy, earl of Worcester, as one of the king's admirals, his under-chamberlain and steward of his household, and also as having made certain expeditions of war and ambassages, of all debts, accounts, arrears of accounts, farms and arrears of farms current in demand against him either singly or with others, saving only to queen Isabel the farm which the said Thomas is bound to render to her for the county of Pembroke.

1399, November 5. (PATENT ROLL, 1 Henry IV, pt. 4, m. 15 (Cal., p. 145).)

Grant for life to the kingís esquire, Thomas Roche, of the office of the constableship of the castle of Pembroke in Wales, with the profits belong, to it, with 3d daily for the wages of the porter of the castle from the issues of the county or lordship of Pembroke; and grant to him for life of £20 yearly.

1399, November 29. (PATENT ROLL Henry IV, pt 3, Ion. 6 (Cal., p 117).)

Grant for life to the king's esquire, Thomas Roche, of the office of constable of the castle of Pembroke in Wales with £20 yearly from the issues of the lordship of Pembroke, at the hands of the king's kinsman William Beauchamp or whoever has the lordship at farm or receives the profits of it, and other profits belonging to the office.

1399, November 29. (PATENT ROLL 1 Henry IV pt. 4, m 21 (Cal p 140).)

Grant to William Beauchamp of the custody of the castle and county of Pembroke, the castles and the lordships of Tenby and Kilgarran and the commote of Osterlowe with, etc.

1400.

Pembroke held by Sir Francis a Court as representative of Queen Isabela who was now a widow.

1400.

Owen Glendower led Welsh resistance.

1400, January 19. (PATENT ROLL, 1Henry IV, pt. 4, m.30 (Cal., p. 233).)

Grant to John Wyndesore and his heirs of the manors of Maynerbier and Pennaly, co. Pembroke, with all rents and services of tenants late of David de Barry, 'chivaler', in Begeley in Wales and all lands, knights' fees and advowsons which he and Thomas Holburst, John Duket, and Thomas Afftenthwayt had of the grant of the said David in the county of Pembroke, and the manor of Esthanney called Filberdescourt, in the king's hands by reason of the forfeiture of John Holand, late earl of Huntingdon, with all fees, advowsons, franchises and liberties.

ACTS OF THE PRIVY COUNCIL (ED. NICOLAS) Id P. 107.

Cotton MS., Cleop., f 3, pp. f9-10.

Ordered that the castle of Pembroke and the other castles near the sea shall be well guarded against the invasion of the enemy.

1400, June 6. (PATENT ROLL, 1 Henry IV, pt 7, m10d. (Cal p315).)

Commission to William de Beauchamp, 'chivaler', Ralph Vernon, 'chivaler', Thomas' Bede, William Gwyn and David Perot, esquire, sheriff of Pembroke, to enquire into the petition of Matilda, late the wife of David Barr, 'chivaler', that dower may be assigned to her from the castle and lordship of Maynerber and the manor of Pennalee in Wales in the said county, of which her husband was seised in his demesne as of fee so that she is entitled to dower, as he alienated the same to William de Wyndesore and Alice de Perers and the said Alice after the deaths of the said David and William sold the same to John, late duke of Exeter, so that the said duke and Alice kept her from her dower for eight years.

1400, November 19. (PATENT ROLL, 2 Henry IV, pt. I, m. 27 (Cal., p381).)

Acquittance of John Moor, late dean of the chapel of Richard II, who by the kingís command has delivered by indenture to the king's clerk, Richard Kyngeston, dean of the king's chapel, and William Loueney, keeper of the great wardrobe, all jewels, vestments and other things pertaining to the chapel and in his custody and charge, except certain jewels, vestments and ornaments which were seized at Penbrok and within the lordship of Gower in Wales at the last coming of Richard II from Ireland, of which he has delivered two schedules to them for full information to sue for their recovery.

1400, February 26, London.

Also on 26 February, in the same year and place, the bishop granted to Sir Nigel Hornyngton, rector of the parish church of MAYNERBYR, of his diocese, a license of non-residence for one year, he applying himself for the same time to general study. And he had letters in the usual form.

1400, June 24.

Also the same day etc., the bishop admitted Master John de Bowlond to the free chapel of COYTKENLACE, of his diocese, vacant by the free resignation of Master John Hyot, to which he was presented to him by Philip Peynale, patron of the same chapel; and instituted him in the person of Master Thomas Pyeton, canon of St. Davids, his proctor, etc. And he rendered etc. And it was written.

1400, (Slebech - knights of St John).

Guy etc. to our beloved sons in Christ, our dean of Goher, as well as John de la Bere, William de la March, esquires, Sir William Walter, chaplain, greeting etc.

Whereas in our ordinary visitation in the deanery of Gower aforesaid, in which the parish church of LLANRYDYAN is, last cononically exercised, it was found clearly that the chancel of the same church was in ruins and notoriously in want of rebuilding and we caused the master of Slebech of the order of St. John of Jerusalem, claiming to be the impropriator of that church on whom the burden of the repair and building of the same chancel falls, to be lawfully admonished to cause such chancel to be duly built and repaired, as he is bound to do, nevertheless the aforesaid master has negligently omitted and even at the present time omits to rebuild the said chancel or repair it in any manner notwithstanding our monitions on any point. So that it is not and has not for a long time been possible for the Divine offices to be celebrated with due honour, to the great peril of the Said master's soul and the evident scandal of the people, whereby the devotion of the parishioners of the same church grows weak, divine worship is diminished in the same, and there is good reason to fear that other perils will arise there from unless precautions be taken very speedily and advisedly. We therefore not wishing to tolerate longer such uncorrected defects, but for the increase of divine worship and the devotion of the people and parishioners of the aforesaid church desiring to apply a speedy remedy in the best manner and form we can of right, have thought fit, according to the requirement of the law; that the fruits, rents and profits, all tithes oblations and emoluments of the same church, whatsoever, be sequestrated to be usefully laid out by you upon the plenary building of the said chancel as far as shall be necessary, according to the counsel aid and supervision of our beloved sons David Gosse, David Wylly, Nicholas ap Traharn, John Oweyn and David Gogh, parishioners of the church aforesaid, as by the tenour of the presents we sequestrate these, committing to you in the Lord the keeping of such sequestration. Wherefore to you and to each one of you severally we commit and firmly enjoining command that you solemnly publish at the most suitable and fitting times and places for this that the said sequestration has been and is ordered so as is declared above, keeping under strict sequestrations as is aforesaid, all fruits, rents, tithes and profits, whatsoever of the church itself, to be laid out on the plenary building of the said chancel, as declared above, until you have other order from us, as you will answer at your peril for the same in the end; publicly and expressly forbidding every one from presuming lightly to violate such sequestration in any manner whatever, under penalty of the law. But if any presume to attempt this, you are to cite him peremptorily to appear before us or our official on the eighth law-day after such citation made to him, to answer touching the violation and disobedience and if necessary to swear to say the truth, and to do and receive further that which justice shall advise. And you are to take care to duly certify us or our official within the term of what you do and of any such violation.

Dated at London, 7 August, 1400.

Also the same reverend father in his inn at London on 21 January in the year abovesaid, admitted John Mane, clerk, to the free chapel of the Blessed Mary of COEDKENLACE, of his diocese, vacant by the death of John Bowlond, at the presentation of Ieuan ap Roppert, patron for this turn in right of the dower of Sybil his wife in the manor of Coedkenlace, and instituted him canonically as rector or Warden in the same: and he had letters etc., to the archdeacon of St. Davids, etc., and the said John Mane, touching the most holy Gospels took a corporal oath of canonical obedience and that he would faithfully cause divine services to be conducted in the said chapel as had been accustomed of ancient time, there being present Philip Pencaer, notary public, Sir Richard Lentwardyn, William Maedston and others.

Guy etc. to our beloved son in Christ, Sir Nigel rector of the parish church of MAYNERBIR, of our diocese, greeting, etc.

Commending thy laudable purpose in wishing, as thou dost assert, to practice the study of letters that thou mayest bear seasonable fruit in the church of God, we by the tenour of these presents (to be of no force after the lapse of the year) grant thee special licence to be absent for one year continuously from thy said church and take and hale the fruits, rents and profits of the same, applying thyself in the meantime to the study of letters in the university of Cambridge, provided nevertheless that thou leave a sufficient proctor in the said church to bear the charges incumbent on thee and thy church and the repair of the chancel and manse, and duly answer in thy stead to us and the rest of our ministers and others on account of thy church aforesaid, provided also that in thy absence a fit portion out of the goods of thy same church be ministered truly to thy poor parishioners and that the same church be not defrauded in divine services in the meantime.

Dated under our seal at London, 8 February, 1401.

1401 (Knights of St John Slebech).

Guy etc., to our beloved son in Christ the prior of the priory of Carmarthen, our vicar general in spiritualities, greeting. We have received with becoming reverence a writ of our most excellent prince in Christ and lord, Lord Henry, by the grace of God king of England etc. lately presented to us, in these words:

Henry etc. to Guy etc., greeting.

We prohibit you from admitting a parson to the church of St. MAUGAN which is vacant, as is said, and touching the advowson of which a contention has been moved in our court between Joan de Bohun, countess of Hereford, and Walter, prior of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem, and you, and Richard, master of the house of St. John, Slebech, and John Comyn, clerk, until it shall have been discussed in the same court whether the advowson of the same church pertains to the aforesaid countess or to the aforesaid prior, you, the master and John.

Witness myself at Westminster, 10 June, in the second year of our reign.

By authority and force of which writ we with strict injunction command you not to admit any person to the aforesaid church of St. Maugan of our diocese, now vacant as is said, touching which a contention has been begun in the court of our lord the king, as is aforesaid until the question of the said advowson shall have been plenarily determined in the king's court aforesaid.

Dated etc., in our manor of Charleton, 20 June, 1401.

1401, 3 September.

Guy etc., to the venerable and discreet men the treasurer and barons of the Exchequer etc., Greeting. We received a writ of the most excellent prince etc. in these words: Henry etc,.

Because we have learned for certain that in divers alien priories that may be given at will, in which before the wars began no prior was instituted of inducted, many monks, alien and others, have before these times very often been and daily are instituted and inducted to our manifold deception; we wish to guard against such deception and to be fully certified by you upon the premises, by advice of our council command that cause your registers and evidences and those of your predecessors from the beginning of the reign of sir Edward I sometime king of England, our progenitor, to the present time be carefully and diligently searched, and that you inform the treasurer and the barons of our Exchequer duly and sufficiently in this behalf of the names of all and singular alien priories in which there have been perpetual priors instituted and inducted before the beginning of the wars aforesaid and since, and of the names of the persons instituted and inducted in the same in the meantime and on what day and in what year, and at the presentation or collation of what persons or person, in what manner so ever and how, by Michaelmas, next, sending this writ with your certificate. Witness myself at Westminster, 23 April in the second year of our reign.

On receipt of which writ indeed by us we caused the registers of our predecessors to be diligently searched, in which, well and faithfully kept, we found certainly in the same that the priory of St Nicholas, Pembroke, in the presentation of the abbot and convent of the monastery of St Martin, Sees, of the order of St Benedict, the priory of St Kened, Llangenyth, in the presentation of the abbot and convent of St Taurin of the diocese of Evreux, and the priory of St Mary, St Clears, in the presentation of the prior and convent of St Martin des Champs near Paris, of the Cluniac order, located and being within our diocese, throughout the time and times contained in the writ, having been perpetual; and the priors of the priories aforesaid in succession, as often as a vacancy happened, were accustomed to be admitted and canonically instituted in the same by the bishop of St Davids for the time being in presentation of their said patrons, and to be inducted in reality in the same by the archdeacons of the places in which they are situated and render oaths of obedience in the usual form, before the wars began as in the writ.

In witness etc.

Dated in our manor of Charleton, 3 September 1401.

1401, February 7. (PATENT ROLLS 2 Henry IV, pt 2, m. 37 (Cal p. 426).)

Grant for life to John Paunsefote, 'chivaler' (maimed on the king's service in Scotland), of £40 yearly from the farms of the castles and lordships of Pembroke, Tynby, and Kilgarran and the commote of Osterlowe.

1401. (PATENT ROLL, 3 Henry 1V, pt. I, m. 26d. (Cal., p. 66).)

Commission to Thomas Carrewe, 'chivaler', and John Michel, serjeant-at-arms, to arrest David Perot of the county of Pembroke, esquire, and bring him before the king and council and to seize all his goods and any armour in his custody.

1402 St Dogmells.

Guy etc.,

Our beloved sons in Christ and of religious men brother Philip Vader, abbot of the monastery ST.DOGMELLS in KEMMEYS of the order of St Benedict of Tiron of our diocese, and the convent of the same, subject to our ordinary jurisdiction in head and members etc. (as above) Whereas by our ordinary authority making a visitation in every deed your said monastery on the seventh and tenth days of the month January lawfully continued, in the year of the Lord 1402 and fifth year of our consecration, found, among other things, in same visitation that first by pestilence then by your neglect the usual number of the canons serving God in the same monastery is so diminished in such excessive number that where there used to be a full convent of honest monks scarcely three monks, professed, are now conversant in the same, consuming the sustenance of a very large number, to the manifest withdrawal of divine worship. For which cause we enjoin on you that you make provision of honest persons to be clothed with you in the habit of regulars, whose conversation in times past may afford a good presumption for the future, so that by the feast of Pentecost next there may be conversant nine in number at the least, in order that by the multiplication of intercessors the gifts of spiritual grace may be increased. And because we found that from the excessive wandering of the lay brothers among secular persons and dishonourable frequenting of unlawful places, to wit taverns, very great evils and scandals have resulted to the same monastery in persons and things, by necessity of which things we are bound to find a fit remedy for the future, we for this cause can be approved of. Also we enjoin that from the opening of the kitchen of the convent until there shall be six in number, the abbot shall have the usual abbot's portion, and after that they shall be more than six in number he shall have and take in all the portion of two monks twice a week at least. Also we enjoin that brother Howel Lange, your fellow monk and confrere, on account of his excess and the evil deeds committed by him, which for a reason we do not now set out, for one whole year from the day of the date of these presents, shall not drink wine, nor metheglin, on which it has been his habit to get drunk, but he shall give away and distribute his portion of wine to the poor in the abbot's presence; and in this year he shall not go out of the bounds of the said monastery unless in the abbot's company. Also we enjoin on the same monks and lay brothers that none of them shall go out of the bounds of the monastery without the special licence of the abbot or in his absence of his deputy, and that such license shall not be too liberal or too continuous. Also that no women suspected in regard to the monks shall by any means lodge in the town itself but they shall be removed altogether, under the penalty written below: also that no lay brother there shall have the witness of his iniquity in the monastery aforesaid that the goods of the monastery be not prodigally consumed by the sustenance of such. Also since we have been informed, as found by experience, that brother David Lloid, your fellow monk, has culpably lapsed into the crime of apostasy (we say it with grief), going forth from the monastery itself and holding himself aloof among secular persons, neglecting the discipline of his order and deserting the cloister, we therefore, since by the judgement of a strict balance his blood may be required at your hands, enjoin on you under the penalty written below that you diligently enquire for this your brother and when found bring him back to the fold and the cloister itself, so treating him with the charity that leads the way and chastising him according to the discipline of the order, that his reproof may turn out for an example to others, and that for his reversion and conversion from error according to the in your church and cloister and the too ready means of entrance to the same and exit from the same, at all hours as it were, the silence and contemplation of the religious, according to the requirement of their religion, cannot be observed, we enjoin on you therefore that on the north side of your church and monastery, no door and no gate and no means of access to the town be left open by day or night, except from the beginning of the mass of the Blessed Mary until the end of high mass in the choir, and except for a sudden passing of the abbot or the cellarer to view the husbandry in the field on that side, after whose passing they shall be closed at once. Also we have found in the same visitation that on account of the excessive and day and night vigils of the monks in the house of mercy, not for the sake of contemplation but of idle gossip together and drinking, the bowels of mercy are burst asunder, evil speaking arises and drunkenness reigns, for which cause we wishing to apply a remedy for this disease and take away from among you the occasion of evil, enjoin on you that in the same house of pretended mercy, except in the vigil of All Saints the week of Christmas and the feast of the Purification of the Blessed Mary, no fire shall be made or kept up, or except at the coming of frost or intolerable cold and while these reign they shall have a fire at the middle hour, by dispensation of the abbot not for the sake of converse together but of warmth, for a suitable time and the portion of the monks in drink and candles shall be diminished according to the discretion of the abbot, since all which is excessive is counted for a vice; and no layman or secular person shall be permitted to be present at the monks' collations except only a servant appointed for these by the abbot.

On you all and singular in virtue of the holy obedience etc. (as above as far as the word excused.] In witness whereof, etc.

Dated at Carmarthen, 14 January, 1402, etc.

1402, February 18.

Orders celebrated by the Reverend Father in Christ and Lord, Lord Guy etc. Bishop, in the church of the priory of St Nicholas, Pembroke, of his diocese, on a Saturday of the four seasons, namely 18th February 1401-02, and in the fifth year of his consecration.

Acolytes:

Traharn ap David

Griffith ap Howel

Robert Pembrok

Thomas Broun

Hugh Waleys

Philip Rogger

Walter Davy

Walter Gilberd

Thomas Heeche

Geoffrey Hylyng

Peter Bride

Thomas Newport

John Johan

John Bowdon

Sub-Deacons:

John Cadygan of the diocese of Winchester, on a title of the prior of Bradwell of the diocese of Lincoln, sufficiently dismissed by letters dismissory of his diocesan,

Llewelin ap Griffith on a title of his patrimony,

Phillip ap Riez, vicar in the choir of our collegiate church of Abergwyly, on a title of his benefice there,

John Lloid, on a title of the monastery of Comhyr,

William Davy, on a title of his patrimony.

Deacons:

Griffuth ap Thomas, on a title of the monastery of Talley,

William Carpenter, on a title of his patrimony,

Brother William Schepperd} monks of Pylle,

Brother Walter Watkyn }

William Gwyn vicar in the choir of our collegiate church of Abergwylly, on a title of the hospital of St Davidís Swansea.

Priests:

John Mele, on a title of the abbot of Comhir,

Henry Breknok, vicar of the choir of our church of St Davids, on a title of his benefice there,

John Mathew, canon.

1402.

Also on 7 March, in the year of the Lord above-said the bishop in his manor of Lantefey admitted Sir John Vachan, chaplain, to the parish church of LLANCOEDMALTR, of his diocese, vacant by the free resignation of Thomas Colham, last rector of the same, to which he has been presented to him by Henry, illustrious prince of Wales, true patron of that church; and instituted him as rector. And he rendered etc. And it was written to the archdeacon of Cardygan etc.

1402, August 3.

Also on 3 August, in the year and place above said, the bishop granted to Richard Wyryot of his diocese, esquire, license to have celebrations in any honourable place of his diocese by any fit chaplain whatsoever, in the presence of himself, his wife and his mother for one year continuously from the date of these presents; Without prejudice, however, to any parish churches of his said diocese; and he had letters, etc.

1402, August 4 Lantefey.

Guy etc., to our beloved son in Christ our dean of Pembroke greeting etc.

Whereas all and singular the subjects of the province of Canterbury who carry away any goods from manors, houses, manors barns, of archbishops, bishops, abbots, priors, rectors, vicars and other ecclesiastical persons, without licence of the same or of the guardians of the same specially appointed for this, are condemned by the sentence of the greater excommunication given for this offence in the provincial constitution of lord Stephen archbishop of Canterbury published in his provincial council at Oxford against such evildoers, and admitted in the diocese of St. Davids, which begins Ex auctoritate nevertheless some sons of iniquity, satellites of Satan, unmindful of their own salvation, have carried away and taken away some goods from our manor of Lantefey in the times of the vacancy of our church of St. Davids by the death of lords Adam Hooton and John Gylberd of good memory, our predecessors, and also in our time and when the church aforesaid has been ours, without and against the will of us or of the guardians of the same; and have caused these to be carried and taken away and ratified such carrying away and withdrawal done in their name, and still detain such goods, culpably incurring the said sentence of the greater excommunication in which they remain still involved to the grave peril of the souls of themselves and of others willing to have part in the same, and the great prejudice of us and our church aforesaid. Wherefore we commit to and strictly enjoining in virtue of obedience command you that in your churches you publicly and solemnly admonish all such evildoers in general to away by them, with sacrilegious hand, as is aforesaid, within six days to be numbered from the time of your monition, if these are in existence, and if not of the price of them, and when the said six days from your monitions are ended, you shall denounce the aforesaid sacrilegious persons who shall not have made such restitution as is aforesaid, when the number of clerks and lay people present in your churches is largest, during the solemnities of the masses, with ringing of the bells, with the cross uplifted, with candles lighted and throwen to the ground for their condemnation and with the other solemnity accustomed to be done in such denunciations, to be excommunicated in general, not ceasing from such pronouncement until you have other mandate from us in this behalf; making inquisition also of the names of such evildoers; and you shall cite, or cause to be cited, any whom you find to be guilty in this behalf to appear before us or before Master Robert Raulyn, our commissary, bachelor in decrees, in the parish church of Lantefey twelve days after such citation made on them [to shew] reasonable causes if any such they have wherefore we should not proceed against them specially in the premises according to the canonical sanctions, [and] to answer, do and receive [as shall be ordered]. And of what you do in the premises certify etc.

Dated etc., in our manor of Lantefey, 4 August, 1402, etc.

1402, Lantfey.

Also on 3 September, in the year and place abovesaid, the bishop admitted Sir John Geffrey, chaplain, to the parish church of LOUDECHURCH vacant by the free resignation of Sir William Cade of Rolleston, last rector of the same, at the presentation of the king, and instituted him as rector etc. And it was written to the archdeacon of Cardigan etc.

1402.

Guy etc. to William Rowe and Margaret Hylton, etc.

We have received letters of the venerable father in Christ Francis, by divine compassion cardinal priest with the title of St. Susannah penancer general of our lord the pope, presented on your behalf, containing this series of words:

To the venerable etc. the bishop of St. Davids or his vicar in spiritualities Francis etc. (as above), greeting etc.

On behalf of William Rowe and Margaret Hilton, a wedded couple of your diocese, a petition has been offered to us containing that some time ago they not being aware of any impediment existing at the present time according to the custom of the country, and consummated this by connection of the flesh and begat offspring. But afterwards it came to the knowledge of this couple that they are united with each other within the fourth degree of consanguinity. And verily since if there were to be a divorce made between them grave scandals in all probability would result there from, the same wedded persons have caused humble supplication to be made for provision to be mercifully made for them upon these points by the apostolic see. We therefore desiring provision to be made for the saving of their souls and for the avoiding of such scandals, by authority of the lord pope, the care of whose penitentiary we bear, and by his special mandate hereon made to us by the oracle of the living voice, commit it to your circumspection that if it be so, if the said woman have not for this cause been ravished from any one, to deal with these married people that not withstanding the impediment of such consanguinity be legitimate.

Dated at Rome at St. Peter, 29 April, in the eleventh year of the pontificate of lord Boniface IX the pope.

Inasmuch therefore as the merits of your life, morals and honourable conversation, and other merits, as we have learned by the relation of faithful men, are suffrages for you to obtain the grace of such dispensation, and you are joined in the fourth degree of consanguinity, as has been found by diligent inquisition which we have caused to be made on these and each and all other points according to the form commanded us in this behalf, we mercifully grant you a dispensation according to the form and effect of the before written letters, by the authority committed to us in this behalf, in order that notwithstanding the impediment of such consanguinity you may lawfully remain in your marriage at another time in fact contracted between you, decreeing the offspring begotten and to be begotten of the marriage itself to be legitimate.

In witness whereof etc. Dated in our manor of Lantefey, 21 September 1402, etc.

Also on 23 September, in the year abovesaid, the bishop, at Kidwelly, collated to Sir Bernard Tyler, chaplain, the perpetual vicarage of LANTEFEY, of his collation and diocese, vacant by the free resignation of Sir Walter Bride, last vicar of the same church. And he rendered etc. And it was written to the archdeacon of St. Davids etc.

1402, September 23.

Guy etc. to Master John Kermerdyn, our official, greeting etc.

Whereas our beloved sons in Christ Sirs John Kydde, vicar of ANGLE, and Robert Salmon, vicar of the parish church of ST. MICHAEL, PEMBROKE, intend, as they assert, to exchange such their benefices with one another and we are unable etc., we grant to you our power and authority etc. Dated at Lagharn, 23 September 1402, etc.

1402, October 24. (PATENT ROLL 4 Henry IV pt 1 m 21 (Cal p 167).)

Grant to Thomas de Percy of 500 marks out of the issues of the castle and county of Pembroke, the castles and lordships of Tyneby and Kilgarran, and the commote of Osterlowe, etc.

1402, February 18. (PATENT ROLL, 3 Henry IV, pt. 1, m11 (Cal., p. 44).)

Exemplification at the request of Elizabeth, countess of Huntyngdon and the king's knight John de Cornewail1, who has married her, of the tenour of the enrolment on the rolls of Chancery of a writing of John Stevenes, esquire, dated 22 January, 3 Henry IV, granting to her for life the castle, manor, and lordship of Manerbeer, and the manor and lordship of Penale with all members, liberties, profits, commodities, rents, services, reversions and appurtenances in the county of Pembroke, with remainder to John, son of the said countess, and John de Shetland, late earl of Huntyndon, and his heirs.

1402, March 21. (PATENT ROLL, 3 Suture IV, w. 6 (Cat OE 54).)

Inspeximus and confirmation to John Steven, esquire, of letters patent of the king's kinsman William de Bello Campo, lord of Pembroke and Bergeveney, dated at Carmarthen 12 October, 2 Henry IV, appointing the said John, by the name of John Stephen, constable of the castle and town of Tenebye for his own life, receiving the accustomed wages and fees; and grant, with the assent of the council of the said of fine to him for life, receiving the accustomed wages, viz., 2d. daily, with the due fees and other profits and commodities.

1402. (ROT PARL.,III p 518).

Petition of the English people of the county of Pembroke that they should no longer be impeached or accused by simple suggestion, and that they should not be imprisoned or arraigned without indictment by due inquest and that they should have their Challenge according to the common law engaged by all his other liege subjects.

1402, November 20. (PATENT ROLL, v Henry IV, by. I, m 13 (Cal., p. [79).)

Exemplification, at the request of the king's lieges of the county of Pembroke, of a petition (French) in the present Parliament that without indictment or accusation taken by due inquest no English of the said county be imprisoned, arraigned or brought to trial, and that they may have their challenges according to the common law; and of the answer of the king. le Roi le voct

[Rolls of Parliaments iii, 518.] By pet. in Parl.

1402, July 23. (ROTULUS VIACII, 3 Henry IV, m27 (Cal., p 139).)

Appointment of Richard, Lord Grey, to assemble people of Pembroke and other parts to war against the Welsh rebels.

1402.

Henry IV issued authority to the bishop to garrison Llawhaden against the raiding parties of Owain Glyndwr.

1403, June 16. (PATENT ROLL 4 Henry IV pt 2 m 19d ( Cal p280).)

Commission of array in the county of Pembroke and the lordships and county of Rous to Thomas, Earl of Worcester Thomas, baron of Carrew, John Organ, John Joce, William Malelefaunt, Thomas Roche, Richard Wiriot, John Eynor, and Thomas Rede, on information that Owen Glyndourdy and other rebels of those parts for want of victuals intend to come suddenly with no small posse to the marches of the county to seek victuals and waste the county.

1403, January 20, London.

Also the same day, in the year and place above-said, the bishop collated to Sir Philip David, priest, the perpetual vicarage of the parish church of BREUDY, of his dioceses vacant for an exchange to be made of it with the perpetual vicarage of LLANDEVAYLOC of his same diocese made in his hands and admitted, and belonging to his collation in full right; and instituted him etc. And it was written to the archdeacon of St. Davids etc.

1403, May 17.

Guy etc. to Master John Kermerdyn our official, greeting etc. To receive the letters presentation of the religious men, brother Philip, abbot of St. Dogmell's, and the convent of the priest, upon the vicarage of FISGARD of our diocese, vacant as it is said, and to enquire or cause enquiry to be made touching the vacancy of the same vicarage and the right and possession of the presenters to the same and the merits of the presentee aforesaid and other articles in that behalf due and accustomed, and if there be not any canonical obstacle to the presenters or the presentee aforesaid whereby the latter ought not to be admitted to the said vicarage and instituted canonically in the same, to admit Sir John or his proctor sufficiently constituted for this to the said vicarage of FISGARD and institute him canonically in the same etc., we commit to you our powers etc.

In witness etc.

Dated at London, 17 May, 1403.

Also the same day the bishop appointed Sir John Howell, rector of the parish church of Jordaniston, of his diocese, to be dean of the deaneries of Roos and Dungleddy. And he had a letter in the usual form.

1403, July 20.

Guy etc. to Sir Richard Wythlokes our dean of St. Davids, greeting etc. We commit to thee and command, with strict injunctions, that thou sequestrate all fruits, rents and profits, tithes and oblations, arising from and belonging to the parish church of CARREU, of our diocese, in the time of the vacancy, and cause them to be kept under strict sequestration as thou wilt answer to us for the same at thy peril.

Dated at London, on July, 1403, the sixth year of our consecration.

1403.

Also on 13 October, in the year abovesaid, the bishop collated, to Master John Colle clerk, at Charleton, the free Chapel of HOGGESTON of his collation and diocese, vacant by the death of Mastel Thomas Picton, last rector or warden of the same; and instituted him etc. And he took the oath etc. And it was written to Sir Richard Wythlokes, dean of Pembroke, or Sir Bernard Tyler, vicar of Lantefey, to induct him, under the same date saving always the archdeacon's right in all things. And he had letters etc.

[Marginal note.] Void because it does not take effect.

1403, October 27.

Also on 27 October, in the year and place above, the bishop collated to Sir Richard Wythlores, priest, the priory or hospital of LAWADEN, vacant by the death of John ap Morgan, last prior or warden of the same, and pertaining to his collation in full right: and instituted him etc. And he took the oath etc. And it was written to the archdeacon of St. Davids etc. And he had letters etc.

1403, November 2.

Guy etc. to Master John Kermerdyn licenciate in laws, our official, greeting etc. Sir Thomas Carreu , knight, has presented to us Sir William Webber, chaplain, to the parish church of Carreu, vacant and belonging to his presentation, as he says. Wherefore we commit to you and command that, summoning those that should be summoned in this behalf, you make diligent inquisition by rectors and vicars of the deanery in which the said church is having fuller knowledge in that behalf touching the right of patronage and the vacancy of the said church, and in what manner it is vacant and when the vacancy began; whether it be liable to pension or portion; touching the merits of the persons presenting and presented to it, and the other articles usually and customarily inquired of in such cases. And of what you find by the same inquisition certify us before the feast of Katharine the Virgin next by your letters close, as is usual, containing the series of these and the names of the inquisitors. Dated under our seal in our manor of Ulcumbe, 2 November, 1403, etc.

1403, November 17.

Also on 17th November, in the year abovesaid, the same reverend father commited to master John Kermerdyn, his official to make inquisition touching the vacancy of the parish church of Tynnerby to which Master John Cole is presented by the religious men the prior and monks of the holy priory of St Nicholas, Pembroke, and, if this inquisition find in full in favour of the presenters and the presentee, to admit the same presentee to the said church and to institute him canonically and cause him to be inducted as rector of the same.. And he had letters in the usual form.

1403, December 9.

Also on 9 December, in the year abovesaid, the bishop in his inn at London admitted Sir William Webber, priest, to the parish church of CARREU, of his diocese, vacant by the death of Sir John Porter, last rector of the same, to which he is presented to him by the noble lord, lord Thomas Carreu, baron of Carreu, knight, true patron of the same church; and instituted him etc. And he took the oath etc. And it was written to the archdeacon of St. Davids etc. And he had letters etc.

1403, December 10.

Also on the 10 December, in the year and place aforesaid, the bishop admitted John Brokholl clerk, to the parish church of Tynneby, of his diocese, vacant by the death of Master Thomas Picton, last rector of the same, to which he is presented to the bishop by the most excellent etc. , Henry etc., king of England, as pertaining to his gift by reason of the temporalities of the alien priory of Pembroke being in his hand on account of the war between himself and his adversary of France, and instituted him etc. And he took the oath etc., And it was written to Sir Waleys, vicar of the said church etc., And he had letters etc.

1403, November 17.

Also on 17th November, in the year abovesaid, the same reverend father commited to master John Kermerdyn, his official to make inquisition touching the vacancy of the parish church of Tynnerby to which Master John Cole is presented by the religious men the prior and monks of the holy priory of St Nicholas, Pembroke, and, if this inquisition find in full in favour of the presenters and the presentee, to admit the same presentee to the said church and to institute him canonically and cause him to be inducted as rector of the same.. And he had letters in the usual form.

1403, October 30. (PATENT R0LL 5 Henry IV, pt. I, m. 27 (Cal p 315).)

Grant to Francis de Court of the castles and lordship of Pembroke, Tyneby and Kilgaren and the commute of Osterlonve, etc.

1403.

PATENT ROLL,. 5 Henry IV, pt. 2,m. 19 (Cal,p. 390).

Grant for life to the king's esquire James Howel, in reward of his labour in the kings wars in those parts, of all lands within the lordship of Newcastle of Emlyn and the counties of Pembroke and Kermerdyn, late of John ap Llewelyn, one of the Welsh rebels, of the value of 20 marks yearly, forfeited to the king on account of his rebellion, provided that he find an archer during the War there for the defence of the country and answer for any surplus.

1403.

Sir Nicholas Carew held Carew Castle.

1404, 10 May. (PATENT ROLL, 6 Henry IV, pt1 (Cal p. 486).)

Licence for John Banoun, burgess of Tenby, and David Iron, dwelling in the same town, to convey certain provisions from England to Kidwelly and Llanstephan for the victualling and garnishing of these farms.

1404, February 28/29th? London.

Also on the last day of the month of February, in the year and place abovesaid, the bishop admitted Sir William John, chaplain, to the perpetual vicarage of the parish church of CARREU, of his diocese, vacant by the free resignation of Sir John Bole, last vicar there, as appears by a public instrument made upon the said resignation, at the presentation of Sir William Webber, rector of the parish church of Carreu before said, and instituted him etc. And he took the oath of obedience etc. And he had letters etc.

1404, July 14.

Also on 14 July in the year abovesaid, at Charlton, the bishop collated to Master John Cole the free Chapel of OGESTON, vacant by the death of Sir Thomas Pycton, last rector or warden of the same, and pertaining to the bishop's collation for this turn by lapse; and instituted him etc. And it was written to Master Philip ap Res to induct him, saving the archidiaconal right. And he had the letters necessary for him in this behalf.

Also on 24 November, at London, in the year above-said, Sir Thomas Mulward, priest, of the diocese of St. Davids, was presented to the reverend father aforesaid to the parish church of ST. PETROC within the lordship of the manor of Stakpoll of the same diocese, by the discreet men John Tolmode and John Boterel1, priests of the diocese aforesaid, lords of the said manor of Stakpoll, co. Pembroke, with the advowsons of all churches that are within the manor, and the other things pertaining to it, by a feoffment of the lady Joan Vernon, late lady of the said manor, patrons of the said church, now vacant by the death of Sir John Griffyth, last rector of the same, and belonging to the presentation of the said John and John. And the aforesaid reverend father committed to Master John Kermerdyn, official of St. Davids, to enquire upon the vacancy of the said church and the other articles usually enquired of, in proper form; and if such inquisition find for the said presented to admit him to the said church, institute him and cause him to be inducted in the same, first taking of him the accustomed oath of obedience. And he had such his commission in the usual form.

1404, December 11.

Also, on 11 December in the year abovesaid, at Charleton, the bishop admitted Sir Howel Mathew, priest, of his diocese, to the vicarage of the parish church of ST. THOMAS THE MARTYR, ST. DOGMELLS, of the same diocese, vacant by the surrender and induction in the church of Dynas of Sir John Creyr, last vicar of the same, to which he is presented to him by Philip, abbot of St. Dogmells aforesaid, and the convent of the same place; and instituted him, in the person of Master Richard ap Gwillym, his lawful proctor, etc. And the said proctor took the oath etc. And it was written to the archdeacon of the place etc.

1404, December 21.

Guy etc. to our beloved son in Christ brother Walter, prior of the priory of the Blessed Mary the Virgin of Pylle, of the order of St. Benedict of Tiron, of our diocese, greeting, etc.

Because we, by favour of the divine clemency, purpose to hold a visitation in very deed of your priory as well in the head as in the members on 23 April next following with continuation and adjournment of days then following, to the praise of God, etc.; also to investigate, inquire and see, in what manner and how the statutes of the canons, and the ordinances and decrees published in your priory aforesaid to the honour of God as well in the times of our predecessors as in our own time have been observed by you and all and singular the monks of your priory and in what manner you live in regard to the observance of the regular discipline, and also of the internal and external state and rule of the said priory; and those things which we find in the priory itself, and the monks and ministers of the same of whatsoever state and condition they be, to need the office of correction or reformation, with paternal affection to correct and bring back to a fit state, as it rests upon our shoulders to do, according to our powers; we, therefore, by the tenour of the presents cite you peremptorily, and through you we will and command, strictly charging, that all and singular the monks and lay-brothers of the said priory, present or absent, be likewise cited, that on the aforesaid day with continuation and adjournment of days then following you and they and every one of the same appear before us or our Commissaries in this behalf in your chapter house, to submit yourselves humbly to such our visitation, and to answer in person to the interrogatories which will be made upon this upon matters concerning the state of the priory and your person, and to do and receive further that which the office and nature of the said visitation call for. We also by the tenour of these presents inhibit-you and will and command that through you all and singular the present members of the said priory be inhibited, from now, from attempting anything or causing anything to be attempted to the prejudice of such our visitation so pending, knowing that it is our intention to rely entirely upon exhibition of these presents having been made to you by our sworn messenger, the bearer of the same. But of the day of the receipt of the presents and of what you do in the premises, with the names and surnames of all and singular the monks and lay-brothers of your said priory, see that you certify us or our commissaries in this behalf at the said day and place by your letters patent having this tenour, strengthened with your seal.

Dated at London, 21 December, 1404, etc.

1405, April 4.

On 4 April 1405, at Lawaden, Robert Raulyn, bachelor in degrees, canon of St Davids, vicar general in spiritualities of the reverend etc., Guy, etc., the reverend father himself being engaged in distant parts, admitted Sir Richard Clememt, priest, to the vacant perpetual vicarage of Castelmartyn, pertaining for this turn to the presentation of the most excellent prince lord Henry king etc., by reason of the temporalities of the priory of Pembroke being in his hand on account of the war between him and his adversaries of France, to which he is presented by the same etc., and instituted him etc., and it is written to the archdeacon of St Davids etc.

1405, April 17.

Also at Lawaden on the 17th day of the said month the same vicar admitted Sir John Hogge, priest, to the perpetual vicarage of the parish church of WESTON, vacant by the death of Sir Lewis ap Griffith ap David at the presentation of the religious man brother Robert Normanthon, locum tenens of brother Walter Grendon, prior of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in England, the prior himself being engaged in distant parts; and instituted him etch And it was written to the archdeacon of St. Davids etc.

1405, June 3.

Guy, etc., to the prior and convent of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Pylle in Ros, of the order of St. Benedict of Tiron, of our diocese, greeting etc.

Whereas by grace of observing the rule of our profession we are stirred up by salutary precepts and monitions that watchful for the flock entrusted to us we may with exact diligence purge out novelties and errors which have grown up in the past times especially amongst religious men, we on 23 April, 1405, and following days, made a visitation in very deed of your priory aforesaid by certain commissaries. In order therefore that the defects and excesses found in your priory aforesaid in such our visitation canonically carried out by such our Commissaries may by the help of the Divine mercy be brought into a better state, Master Robert Rawlyn, canon of our church of St. Davids, our vicar general in spiritualities (we being then for necessary causes engaged in distant parts) by our authority, canonically drew up for you the injunctions, monitions, precepts and mandates written below and charged and commanded under the pains and censures contained in the same that these be we on 23 April, 1405, and following days, made a visitation in very deed of your priory aforesaid by certain commissaries. In order therefore that the defects and excesses found in your priory aforesaid in such our visitation canonically carried out by such our commissaries may by the help of the Divine mercy be brought into a better state, Master Robert Rawlyn, canon of our church of St. Davids, our vicar general in spiritualities (we being then for necessary causes engaged in distant parts) by our authority canonically drew up for you the injunctions, monitions, precepts and mandates written below and charged and commanded under the pains and censures contained in the same that these be observed by you and every one of you for your good, never the-less it has several times come to our ears by the testimony of faithful men, by public report and by notoriety of fact (we say it with grief) that thou brother Walter, prior aforesaid, hast not troubled to observe in your person such injunctions, monitions, precepts and mandates, admitted in the first instance by receipt and both tacitly and expressly, but hast lightly presumed daily and dost still presume to infringe and violate them in many ways to the great peril of thy soul, a pernicious example to very many, the scandal of thy order, the diminution of public worship, and the grievous damage of the beforesaid priory, prodigally consuming the goods and jewels of the same. Wherefore we have charged and enjoined on thee, over and above the former command, in virtue of holy obedience and under the pains and censures contained in the same injunctions, etc., that thou observe all and singular the things included in the same concerning and relating to your person, and especially that thou abstain altogether from all and all manner of alienation of the temporal goods of the said priory, that thou presume not to violate our said sequestration duly and lawfully imposed by the aforesaid Master Robert Raulyn, vicar etc., on the goods of the said priory because thou didst before that notoriously dissipate and waste these and there is every reason to fear that thou wilt so waste these in future and to be observed by thee, as is aforesaid, under the penalties in the constitution of the Holy Fathers in thast behalf duly published [and] that thou cause the relics, jewels, ship and other goods of the said priory which have been unduly alienated by thee, beyond and contrary to such injunctions, etc., to be at once restored to the priory. And in as much as we have found the aforesaid William Scheperd, fellow-monk and cellarer of the said priory, Walter Jordan, Sirs Thomas Heth and William Lyghtfot, rectors of Talbenny and Jonyston, powerless to keep our said sequestration, without other help, on account of the might, rebellion and disobedience of the said prior, by the tenour of these presents we add to them the noble man Sir John Wogan, knight, and Sir William Meylor, vicar of Steynton, committing unto the same, in the lord, the keeping of the said sequestration. Wherefore to you Sir John, brother William, Walter and Sirs Thomas, William and William, firmly enjoining we commit and command that you solemnly- publish at places and times most suitable for this that our said sequestration has been and is imposed so as is aforesaid, [and], that keep such goods, fruits, rents, tithes and ablations and profits, sequestrated so as is aforesaid, under strait and safe sequestration, until you have other Command from us upon this ,as you will answer of and for the same at your peril when this shall be required of you on our behalf, provided nevertheless that in the meantime the said priory be laudably served in divine offices and that the charges incumbent thereon be duly supported by the said brother William the cellarer, as is contained in the same injunctions, monitions, precepts and mandates, of the said Master Robert, our vicar general in spiritualities; inhibiting openly, publicly, and expressly, every one from lightly presuming to violate in any manner whatever such our sequestration, under the penalties in this behalf duly published in the constitutions of the Holy Fathers. The tenours truly of the same injunctions, etc., follow under this form: Robert Raulyn, bachelor in decrees, etc., to the religious men brothers Walter Robjoy, of the priory of the Blessed Mary etc., (as above) directly subject to the jurisdiction of the ordinary, John Hygyn, William Schepherd and Henry Wratkyn, fellow-monks of the same priory, and forming the convent in the same, sends greeting in the Lord and that ye firmly obey these presents. Whereas in a visitation, ordinary and fatherly, in your said priory now lately exercised judicially and in very deed by certain commisionaries with sufficient authority of the said reverend father! been previous complaints, we have found some defects, negligences, omissions, relaxations and excesses needing necessary reform and correction, by which if they be not met by a speedy remedy the said priory will incur perpetual ruin and hurt in ritual and temporal things (which be far from it) and loss for which cause we wishing to meet such perils and losses by authority of the said father whose powers we bear, send you our injunctions upon the premises written below, firmly enjoying on you and every one of you in virtue of the holy obedience in which you are bound to the said father and under penalty of the greater excommunication which (the canonical monition having been already given) we pass in these writings and publish, from now as from then and from then as from now, upon your persons if (which be far from you) you will not or trouble not to obey our monitions and injunctions written below, and upon the person of that one of you who among you will not or does not trouble to but neglects to obey, firmly enjoining that you receive humbly our inunctions written below so far as they concern you jointly or each one of you, and render obedience to and obey the same with effect.

First of all, because by the findings of the same visitation, we have found that thou brother Walter, prior beforesaid, throughout the time and from the time of thy rule and appointment there, hast administered alone, laid out at the peculiar pleasure and decree of thy will, and expended as though they were thine own, all and singular the goods of the said priory spiritual and temporal which ought to be in common among you, and throughout the time aforesaid and so for eight years and more thou hast rendered no account or reckoning of such thy stewardship and administration, above and contrary to the rules of religion and the canonical sanctions, and the said priory (we record it with sorrow) because of thy prodigality and other things which for the present we do not mention, is burdened with a huge debt, but what and how large this is, is entirely unknown on account of such omission of any reckoning of account and the default among you, the metropolitans. Wherefore we wishing, as we are bound, to apply a seasonable remedy for such you perils enjoined on you , among other things, strictly charging you [in the name] of the said father, that in all time to come in your same priory one of you whom the prior and the greater and saner party of the monks shall see fit to elect among them shall be appointed yearly to be cellarer, who for his time shall receive all goods of the said priory pertaining to the office of the cellarer, within and without and expend and lay out these towards the sustenance of the prior and his monks, according to the estate and requirement of each one, and the common benefit of the house, and hospitality according to such discretion as is given to him; and the same cellarer, twice every year, namely, within eight days after the feasts of St. Michael and the Apostles Philip and James, or oftener if expedient, shall be bound, whatever be his estate or degree even though he be the prior, to render a faithful account and reckoning before the prior and his confreres, of his receipts, expenses and payments, under penalty of perpetual disability from advancement to any degree or estate, or dignity, in the same priory, removal and deprivation from any degree or dignity already held, unless there be reasonable cause. And because in the appointment of such cellarer in times past, we have found that you the prior and monks have been negligent and remiss, and have tolerated the grave damage and injury to the priory by such sole administration without rendering of account, we, as we are bound in this behalf, supplying your defect, ordain and depute brother William Scheperd, your fellow-monk and confrere, especially discreet and prudent at the same time as we have learned by the report of very many, to be cellarer of your same priory and by these presents have appointed him cellarer, committing to him the administration of all goods of the said priory pertaining to the office of cellarer, within and without, by view nevertheless of the discreet men Walter Jordan and Sir Thomas Heth, William Lyghtfot rectors of Talbenny and Jonyston, in whose hands we have sequestrated and thought well to sequestrate by these presents all goods of the said priory for fear of dilapidation which we have good reason to fear from the doings of the past, and we strictly charge him to give account of his receipts and administration in manner and form aforesaid and under the penalties abovesaid. And since we have found in the same visitation that your said priory, although greatly oppressed with debt, is overcharged with superfluous and useless men, we enjoin on you, charging you under the penalties abovesaid, to expel altogether from the same priory within fifteen days immediately following the receipt of these presents Richard Wade, John Wade, his son, and Thomas Newport, because they are talebearers and sowers of discord among you, the prior and monks, and who are entirely useless to the said priory and wasters of it, and also because the said Thomas Newport lightly laid violent hands on the before named Henry Watkyln monk of the said priory, and Sir Robert Martyn, rector of the church of Pontfayn, and your said prior's father and mother with their household, who are too burdensome and useless to the priory (although it is written "maintain parents" nevertheless it is forbidden to rob Peter and give to Paul, and a man shall leave father and mother and cleave unto the profit of his spouse '), with care, reverence and honour, not tolerating longer the ministering unto them or any other useless persons of the goods of the priory aforesaid, unless some charitable relief and this with the express consent of the convent, without the priory however, and [not] immoderately be bestowed on the priors parents by the hands of the almoner, in no wise to recede in time to come such an useless household for along stay, under the penalties abovesaid. Furthermore, charging thee under the penalties above said, we enjoin that thou brother Walter, prior beforesaid Within three months immediately following the date of these presents render a faithful account and reckoning to thy aforesaid confreres of the goods of the priory aforesaid, throughout the time and from the time of thy rule in the same, and of thy receipts and administration leaving the rolls of the accounts of thee and of the cellarers for the time being in the archives of the house for an example to posterity. Furthermore we enjoin under the penalties abovesaid, Strictly charging, that the cellarer so by us or by you elected be not removed from office, without the common consent of the convent and the greater part, at the suggestion or dissatisfaction of one of you, and that the said cellarer or prior shall not [jointly] or [singly] make any form or alienation of goods of the said priory to any person whatsoever, except by Common consent, as is aforesaid, after diligent discussion is had upon this in the chapter, and he of you who shall do the contrary in the premises let him be judged as an appropriator and heavily punished according to the regular observances, because that which will touch all should be approved by all. And because we have found in the same visitation that you monks using fictitious privileges obtained defacto without the licence of your prior, in contempt of your prior and him who has the cure of your souls, confess your sins to others in cases not permitted of right, this thing we forbid to be done henceforth, reserving your confession by these presents to your prior or in his absense to one specially deputed in his place. And thou prior presume, after a lapse, to confess your sins whatsoever they be to one brother William Stodon, who is too simple and in the intervals of sickness has not discretion and does not know how to use the proper medicine for sins committed, and has no power in the premises because he has not been presented to or received by the ordinary, deceiving your own soul, because when the blind leads the blind both fall headlong into the ditch, this thing we forbid henceforth to him and thee, except in the moment of death, reserving by these presents thy confession in more trivial matters to one of the saner of thy brethren, but graver cases to our lord the bishop or his penanced unless thou shalt merit to obtain the more abundant grace of having a confessor selected for thee by our lord the bishop or by us. and since as in the same visitation we have found that you monks casting off the bridle of obedience do not fear to go out of the bounds of the priory without asking and obtaining the licence of your prior or his special deputy, and alone wandering amongst secular persons Contrary to the regular observances, this thing in virtue of holy obedience we forbid henceforth to be one, adding by way of injunction that an accused person convicted in the premises shall be punished for a first offense heavily, for a second more heavily, and for a third shall be delivered to dreadful prisons, from this injunction however we have excepted the cellarer of the house, who as his office requires must be occupied daily within and without about the business of the house. We will, however, that your prior have his chamber by the house, his faculty, disposition and honour, as is meet. Also we have found in the same visitation that thou, prior, on thy part, and you, monks, on yours, making division and party, cleaving unto seculars and secular power, prodigally consume the common goods of your priory, this thing we forbid to be done henceforth under the penalties abovesaid, having before our eyes the psalm Behold how good and joyful a thing it is brethren to dwell together in unity and that only in time of peace is the Author of Peace worshipped well. We will therefore and Command with injunctions, that our present injunctions be laid up in the archives of the house. We will however that a copy be supplied to each one of you that he may not be able to pretend ignorance. And of what you do in the premises and in what manner in obeying what we have decreed to be done in this behalf, see that you certify the said reverend father or us, in his absence, distinctly and openly, by the feast of St. Barnabas the Apostle by your letters patent containing the series of theses sealed with your common seal.

Dated in the castle of Lawaden, 3 June, 1405.

1406, 21 November.

Robert Raulyn, bachelor in decrees, canon of St. Davids, vicar general in spiritualities of the reverend, etc., Guy, etc., now engaged in distant parts, to the religious man brother Walter Robjoy, prior, etc., sendeth greeting in the Son of the Glorious Virgin and that you firmly obey these presents. Whereas in a visitation . . . and fatherly in the said priory now late in time judicially and in very deed carried out by certain commissaries, with sufficient authority of the said reverend father, there having been previous complaints made, we have found clearly by legal documents plain evidence, strong presumptions, and notoriety of fact, which cannot be hid by any prevarication, that thou brother Walter, prior beforesaid, hast wickedly consumed the goods of the said priory with Joan Moris, wife of John Hicke, thy paramour, whom thou hast held in adulterous embraces for some years, to the great peril of thy soul, a pernicious example to many, the scandal of thy order, and the grave damage of thy said priory, and prodigally wasted these by gifts to thy pimps and fautors favouring thee and the said paramour in such crime of adultery and to several secular jurors in order that they should feloniously indict brother John Baker thy fellow-monk, in his lifetime, and maliciously oppress other of thy fellow-monks according to the ordering of thy will, to the grave damage of them and thy priory and the scandal of the order, so that thy said priory in consequence of the premises and other excesses, not at present set out here on account of a feeling of reverence interceding for thee in this behalf, is burdened with an enormous debt. In order therefore that by the help of the Divine mercy such defects may be reformed, we, by authority of the said father whose powers we bear, send specially to thee by these presents the injunctions, monitions, precepts and mandates written within, in addition to other injunctions specially sent to thee and thy fellow monks jointly under this same date. Seeing that we are to abstain not only from evil but from all appearance of evil we enjoin on thee on pain of deprivation and removal from the of office of thy priory beforesaid not to go in person to Joan herself or her house, openly or in secret, nor to have speech with her in anything likely to cause suspicion; and we inhibit thee under the penalties abovesaid from entering into any contract of purchase, sale, accommodation, or loan, in respect of goods of thy priory or doing anything in the way of charging thy priory, without the express consent of all thy fellow-monks or the greater part of the same we ad-monish thee also, once, twice, thrice, and peremptorily, that thou obey our said injunctions, monitions, precepts and mandates, and humbly observe these, on pain of the greater excommunication which, in view of the delay, the fault and the offense, which have gone before, we pass in these writings and publish, from now as from then and from then as from now, against thy person if thou obey not the same zenith effect.

In witness whereof etc.

Dated in our inn at London, 21 November 1406 and the tenth year of our consecration.

1406.

Sir Francis a Court made a pact with Owain Glyndwr to leave Pembrokeshire alone. The money paid over being lodged with Stephen Perrot of Jestynton and John of Castlemartin.

1406 March 21.

Also on 21 March in the year abovesaid, at London, the same reverent father admitted Sir John Clifford to the parish church of Angle of our diocese, on the presentation of the most excellent prince etc., Henry king etc., patron for this turn by reason of the temporalities of the priory of St Nicholas, Pembroke, being in his hands by occasion of the war between himself and his adversaries the French; and him, etc., he instituted etc.,.

1406, December. (EXCHEQUER K R. ACCOUNT, BUNDLE 44, NO. 13.)

Auditors - Roger Westwode, baron, Richard Appelton, clerk.

Wales. - Account of Francis Court, ' chevalier', of divers artillery and stuffs by him received of Henry Somer, late keeper of the king's wardrobe in the Tower of London, for the safe custody of the castle of Pembroke from 23 May, 7 Henry IV (1406) to Michaelmas, 12 Henry IV (1411).

Received 16 crossbows, 3,000 quarells, 4 hausepees, 4 baldricks, 50 lbs of powder for guns and 50 lbs of saltpetre, all of which remain there.

1406, March 22.

Also on the 22nd day of the same month, the same reverend father granted to Philip Rosse, rector of the parish church of MAYNORBERYS licence of non-residence in his said church for one year. And he had letters in the usual form.

1406, March 23.

Also on 23 March, in the year abovesaid, a commission for a visitation of the clergy and people of the diocese of St. Davids went out directed to Masters John Kermerdyn and Philip Craddok.

1406, September 11.

Guy, etc., to Master John Kermerdyn, our official, greeting, etc. our beloved sons, brother Walter Robjoy, prior of St. Mary's, Pylle in Ros, and John Hygon, William Schepperd and Henry Watkyn, fellow-monks and confreres of the said priory, have presented to us Sir John Geffray, chaplain, to the parish church of Hubbeston in Ros, of our diocese, vacant and pertaining to their presentation, as they say. Wherefore we commit to and command you, etc.

Dated in our manor of Olcomb 11th September, 1406, etc.

1406, October 21.

Also on 21 October, in the year abovesaid, at London the bishop admitted Sir John Geffray chaplain to the parish church of HUBBERSTON in ROS vacant by the death of Sir William, last rector, to which he is presented to him by the religious men brother Walter Robjoy, prior of the priory of St. Mary, Pylle in Ros, and the brethren of the same house, true patrons of the same, and instituted him etc. And it was written to the archdeacon of St. Davids etc.

1406, October 22.

Also on 22 October, in the year abovesaid, the same reverend father admitted Master Robert Raulyn, bachelor in decrees, to the parish church of ROSSELY, of his diocese, to which he has been presented by brother Walter Grendon, prior of the Hospital of St John of Jerusalem in England, true patron of the same church. And it was written to Sir William Wayschborn, vicar of the parish church of Landevaylok, to induct him or his proctor in his name, first summoning to this Sir John Robert and any other incumbent in the same whatsoever to shew and prove in form of law wherefore the premises ought not to be done and he took the oath etc. And he had the necessary letters.

1406 - 1411. (PATENT ROLL., 7 Henry IV, pt 1, m 22.)

Comfirmation of grant of the lordship of Pembroke, etc, to Francis de Courte, etc.

1406, 10 May. (PATENT ROLL., 7 Henry IV, pt 2, m 29.)

Pardon to William Hunter, of Pembroke, in South Wales, of the suit of peace which pertains to the king against him touching, this that on Thursday next after the Assumption of St Mary, 4 Henry IV, when detained in the gaol of the city of Lincoln, he confessed before William Dalderby, one of the coroners of the city, that on Tuesday after the Assumption at Lincoln he stole a collar of Edmund Buge of black silk dotted with silver letters S to the value of 6s., and touching the break of the prison.

1406, 9 October. (PATENT ROLL., 8 Henry IV pt 2, m 13 (Cal p 331).)

Grant of denization to the king's knight Francis de Court, who has become the kingís liege man and has done homage to the king; and grant that he may hold the lordship of Penbrok and all other lands which he has of the grant of the king, the kingís father and the king's son the prince.

1407, February.

Guy, etc., to John, prior of the priory of St.Thomas the Martyr, Haverford, greeting, etc.

Order, Although all and singular who hinder or disturb, cause others to hinder or disturb, or ratify these things done in their name, any persons whatsoever holding ecclesiastical benefices and any one of them from being able to dispose freely in respect of such their benefices of the tithes, profits, rents, fruits and oblations of the same, or who lightly withdraw, carry away or take away, cause or procure to be withdrawn, carried away or taken away, tithes, fruits, rents, profits and oblations, beyond and contrary to the will of rectors and vicars and other ecclesiastics, or ratify such withdrawal, carrying away and taking away, done in their name, are in the constitutions of the holly father, in the condemnation of the sentenced the greater excommunication, nevertheless some sons of iniquity, satellites of Satans unmindful of their own salvation, have hindered and disturbed and still disturb Master John Cole, rector or warden of the free chapel of Ogiston, from being able to dispose freely in respect of his said chapel of the tithes, profits, fruits, rents and oblations of the same free chapel, as of right he should, and have ratified and still ratify such impediment and disturbance done in their name; and such his tithes, fruits, rents, profits and oblations, beyond and against his will, they have withdrawn, carried and taken away, caused or procured to be withdrawn, carried and taken away, and have ratified the withdrawal, carrying and taking away, done in their name, and still illegally detain such tithes etc. withdrawn, carried away and taken away, incurring the condemnation of the said sentence of the greater excommunication under which they still remain to the grave peril of the souls of themselves and of others Willing to have dealings with the same, and the great prejudice of the said Master John and his chapel aforesaid. Wherefore we commit unto [and] firmly enjoining in virtue of obedience and under pain of the greater excommunication command you that you during the solemnization of mass when the number of people present is largest, with ringing of bells, with the cross uplifted, with candles lighted and thrown to the ground for their Condemnation, and the other solemnity usual in such denunciation, you denounce all and singular such malefactors as having been so excommunicated generally, and as being excommunicated, not ceasing from such denunciation until you have other mandate from us.

Dated on the day and in the year and place abovesaid.

And like mandates went out to the rector and the vicar of Carrew; the rector and the vicar of Manerbeere; and the rector of St. Giles; and to all curates of the same deaneries.

1407, February 15.

Guy etc to Sir John, rector of the parish church of Tynbie, and Sir Richard vicar of the same church, greeting, etc.

Although all persons what-soever, admitted to the rule of a church and the cure of souls, are bound according to the sacred, canons. to reside personally in such benefices, nevertheless one Sir William Wytlock, Prior of the priory of Lawaden, not troubling to reside in his said priory, but at Tenby openly keeping in his house one Gladusa Meuric, his concubine, leads a life above measure dissolute and inhumanly and with closed doors (?) leaves his priory unofficiated and remains away for no small periods of time to the grave peril of the souls of his parishioners and a grievous and pernicious example to others. Wherefore we being unable, for our pastoral office, to tolerate that the cure of the said priory be unofficiated, as is aforesaid, to the peril of souls commit unto and command you and either of you that you or either of you admonish the said Sir Richard Whytlock that within a month of the time of such monition to be numbered continuously he go himself to his priory aforesaid and under penalty of the law reside in the same personally as the cure of the said priory requires and that you or once of you admonish the said Sir Richard himself that he cast out the aforesaid Gladusa, his concubine, from his house within a month of the time of such your monition to be numbered continuously, never from now to admit her or any other women, under the penalty in the constitutions of the holy fathers duly published in this behalf, otherwise if within the aforesaid time he have not cared to return to his priory and reside in the same and remove the aforesaid Gladusa from his house, as has been said before, you are to cite the same Sir Richard Whytlock, or cause him to be cited, peremptorily, to appear before our official in the first consistory in the deanery of Doungledy to be held by the official himself after the lapse of the said month to allege and put forward before the same official in form of law reasonable causes, if he have any, wherefore he should not be deprived of such priory, as his fault and offense require. And you are to certify the beforesaid official at the proper time by your letters patent, sealed with an authentic seal, of what you do in the premises.

Dated etc., in our manor of Ulcombe, 15 February 1407, etc.

1407, March 31.

Also on 31 March, 1407, at Charlton, the same reverend father granted to Sir John Porter, rector of the parish church of NEWPORT in KEMEIES, a special licence of non-residence from the date of the making of these presents until Michaelmas next to come; provided that the said church be laudably served in divine offices and the usual charges of the same duly borne.

1407, June 12.

Also on 12 June, in the year as above, the bishop appointed Sir Thomas Broun, rector of Freystrop, to be dean of the deanery of Pembroke.

1407, 12 June.

Also on 12 June, in the year above, at London the bishop authorised an exchange between Sirs James Vynor, then rector of the parish church of Freystrop, and Thomas Broun, then rector of Cronwer, of his diocese, and the causes of such exchange having been found lawful and approved and their resignations because of the said exchange of the benefices mentioned having been duly made by Sir Richard Jordan, priest, of the said diocese of St Davids proctor of the aforesaid Sir James Vynor etc., as well as by the aforesaid Thomas Broun, then present there in person, and admitted by the bishop himself, the same bishop admitted the aforesaid Sir Thomas Broun to the aforesaid church of Freystrop at the presentation of the prior and convent of Pylle of the order of St Benedict of Tiron, patrons of the said church etc.,. and subsequently on the same day and at the same place, the aforesaid bishop admitted the aforesaid Sir James Vynor in the person of his proctor aforesaid etc., to the church of Cronwer aforesaid at the presentation of Sir Henry, king of England, etc., and vice-patron by reason of the temporalities of the priory of St Nicholas, Pembroke, being in his hand on account of the war between him and his French adversaries, patron of the same church; and instituted him as rector, etc.

1407, November 24.

On the 24th day of the same month etc. he ad-mitted Sir John Malenfant, priest, to the free chapel of HODGESTON of the diocese of St. David's, vacant by the free resignation of Master John Smyth last rector of the same; on the presentation of Henry Malenfant and Thomas Sturmyn, lords of Hodgeston, true patrons of the said free chapel for this turn, and instituted him as rector etc.

1408, 21 March.

On 21 March in the year abovesaid at Haverford by force of a commission of the reverend etc., Richard bishop of London, directed to him on this behalf and his own ordinary authority, the same vicar (Master John Hiot Bishop of St David) set forward the underwritten exchange in form following; Sir Philip Rosse, rector of the parish church of Manorbier of the diocese of St Davidís and Sir John Hayward, rector of the parish church of St Martin Pomeroy, of the city and diocese of London, resigned their benefices aforesaid for an exchange, to be made with one another etc., and the vicar admitted the said Philip to the latter church on the presentation of the prior and convent of the priory of St Bartholomew, Smethfield, true patrons of the church and instituted him rector; and admitted the said Sir John Heyward to the church of Manorbier on the presentation of the king patron for the turn by reason of the alien priory of Pembroke being in his hands on account of the war between him and his French adversaries and instituted him as Rector.

1408, April 2.

On 2 April, at St. David's, the same vicar admitted Sir Richard Touker, priest, to the vicarage of the church of ST. DOGMELL in Pebidiawke, vacant by death of Sir John Philippe last vicar of the same; on the presentation of Sir John Noke, precentor of the cathedral church of St. David's, and the chapter of the same place.

1408, April 5.

On 5 April at Pembroke he admitted Sir Roger Bampton , chaplain, to the vicarage of the church of St. Cross, Brecon, vacant by the free resignation of Master Morgan ap Res last vicar there; on the presentation of the religious men John, prior, and the convent of the priory of Brecon; and instituted him in the person of Madoc Hire, clerk, his proctor.

1408, May 25.

On 25 May at St. David's he admitted Sir John Marler, chaplain, to the parish church of LAWRENNY of the diocese of St. David's, vacant by the death of Sir Robert Daldene, last rector of the same; on the presentation of Sir Gilbert Denys, knight, true patron etc of the right of the presenter etc. and to induct him if the inquisition warranted this. And he instituted him, in the person of John Halle, his proctor, as rector of the same.

1408, July 12.

On 12 July in the year abovesaid, at Slebech, Sir William Styward, chaplain, presented to the vacant church of ST. PETER, CARMARTHEN, by Thomas, prior of the priory of St. John the Evangelist, Carmarthen, and the convent of the same place, had a commission to the archdeacon of Carmarthen or his official to enquire of the right of the presenter etc.

1408, July 14.

On 14 July in the year abovesaid at Haverford, the aforesaid vicar general admitted Adam Raceton, clerk, to the parish church of RUDBAXTON of the diocese of St. David's, vacant by the death of Master John Blakman, last rector of the same, on the presentation of the venerable religious man brother Walter Grendon, prior of St. John of Jerusalem in England, true patron etc.; and instituted him in the person of brother John Brisele his lawful proctor.

1408, October 8.

On 8 October, 1408, at St. David's, Sir John Hogge, chaplain, was personally admitted to the parish church of SAINT LAURENCE of the diocese of St. David's, vacant by the death of Sir William Here last rector of the same, and pertaining to the presentation of brother Walter Grendon prior of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in England, true patron of the same place; and was canonically instituted in the same. And he had a mandate to the archdeacon of the place, etc.

1408, December 3.

On 3 December in the year abovesaid at Haverford the aforesaid vicar general admitted Sir John Touker, chaplain, to the vicarage of the parish church of WYSTON of the diocese of St. David's, vacant by the resignation of Sir John Hogge last vicar of the same, and pertaining to the presentation of brother Walter Grendon, prior of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in England, true patron etc. and instituted him etc.

1408, September 3. (PATENT ROLL, 9 Henry IV, pt. 2 m. 4 (Cal p 468).)

Pardon to John Adam of Tynby for all felonies, etc., committed by him except treason, murder, rape and common larceny.

1408, November 16. (PATENT ROLL, 10 Henry IV, pt. 1 m. 22 (Cal, p. 28).)

Pardon to the king's esquire John Wyse for having broken the chamber of one Thomas Haulton, citizen of London, within the inn of one William Stoket of London and stolen divers goods in it, viz. a chain and a lock of silver weighing 2 1/2 ounces, worth 2s 4d the ounce, four girdles set with silver worth 20s, five spoons of silver worth 10s, a cup of maple bound with silver and gilt worth 13s 4d, a fur worth 40s and a cloth and a towel worth 13s 4d, of the said Thomas, by which the latter sued a writ of appeal of robbery against him by the name of John Wyse of the county of Pembroke.

1409, 15 February.

At St. David's, the vicar general aforesaid admitted Sir Lewis David, chaplain, to the vicarage of the church of AMBLESTON vacant by the free resignation of Sir David Kellan last vicar of the same and pertaining to the presentation of the venerable religious man brother Walter Grendon prior etc., true patron of the same vicarage; and instituted him etc.

1409, 1 February.

At St. David's, the aforesaid vicar general admitted Sir John Barrey, chaplain, to the vicarage of the parish church of St. Florence of the diocese of St. David's, vacant and pertaining to the presentation of Master John Kermerdyn, rector of the same, true patron etc. and instituted him etc.

1410, 28 March.

On 28 March of the year abovesaid, the aforesaid vicar (Master John Hiot Bishop of St David) at St Davidís admitted William Henry, deacon, to the parish church of Ludchurch of the diocese of St Davids, vacant by the free resignation of Sir John Thomas, last rector of the same, and pertaining for this turn to the presentation of lord Francis de Courte lord of Pembroke by occasion of the temporalities of the alien priory of Pembroke with the advowson of churches belonging to the said priory being in his hands of the grant of King Henry IV. And he instituted him etc.

1410, 16 May.

On 16 May in the year abovesaid, at Haverford, the aforesaid vicar admitted Master Philip Pencaer, priest, to the free chapel of REYNALTON of the diocese of St. David s, vacant by the death of Sir Thomas Loke last rector of the same and in the gift of the prior and convent of the priory of St. Thomas the Martyr, Haverford; and instituted him sworn to canonical obedience etc.

1410, 6 June.

On 6 June in the year within written, at Camrose, the aforesaid vicar general admitted Sir Philip Payn, chaplain, to the parish church of LLYWEN of the diocese of St. David s, vacant by the death of Sir David Commot last rector of the same, and in the gift of John ap Eynon esquire true patron of the same church; and he instituted him etc.

1410, 5 July.

On 5 July in the same year, at Haverford, the same admitted Sir Thomas Eynon, priest, to the church of TALBENNY of the diocese of St. David's, vacant by the death of Sir Thomas Heche last rector of the same, and in the gift of Elizabeth late wife of Thomas Roche in right of dower, [and] Edmund Ferreres and George Longevile in right of their wives, daughters and heirs of Thomas Roche aforesaid; and instituted him etc.

1410, 2 September.

On 2 September in the year abovesaid, at Haverford, the same vicar general granted to Adam Philip vicar in the choir of the cathedral church of St. David's, deacon letters dimissory to the order of the priesthood.

1410, 4 September.

On the fourth day of the aforesaid month of September at Haverford, the same vicar general granted to brother Philip Nicholl monk professed of the monastery of St Dogmell by Cardigan of the diocese of St. Davidís, of the order of St Benedict of Tiron of the diocese of St. David's, deacons letters dimissory to the order of the priesthood.

1410, 5 September.

On the fifth day of the same month at Haverford the same vicar general admitted Sir Rees son of Adam Gwyns priest to the parish church of HENLLAN AMGOED Of the diocese of St. Davidís vacant by the death of Sir John White last rector Of the same and in the gift of Sir Thomas Carrewe, knight, lord of Narberh, Howel ap Gruffuth ap Hcnry and Jeuan ap Philipp ap Res. And he instituted him in person in the same after that he had taken the usual oath of canonical obedience and he had letters etc.

1414, 20 July. (PATENT ROLL (Cal p. 170).)

Grant of Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, of the castles and lordships of Pembroke, Tenbeigh and the commotes of Ostrelawe, Treyne and Seynclere in Wales, etc.

1416, 26July. (PATENT ROLL, 4 Henry V m. 22d. (Cal., p. 76).)

Commission, during pleasure, to Robert Hill to hear and determine all treasons in the county and lordships of Pembroke etc.

1417, 2 February. (PATENT ROLL, 4 Henry V m. 4(Cal., p. 64).)

Pardon to David Howell of South Wales, in the county of Pembroke, esquire, for all treasons, murders, rapes, rebellions, insurrections, felonies, conspiracies, trespasses, offenses, negligences, extortions, misprisons, ignorances, contempts, concealments, impeachments, and deceptions committed by him; and grant to him of all his lands, rents, services and other possessions and goods forfeited to the king on that account.

1418, 1st July Southampton. (PATENT ROLL 5 Henry V, m.8 (Cal., p. 129).)

Whereas the king's brother Humphrey, duke of Gloucester holds of the king, among other premises, the castle, town and Lordship of Pembroke, the manor called "la Priorie" of Pembroke, the castle and town of Tynby, the manor and hundred of Castlemartyn, the castle and lordship of Llanstephan, the manors of Ostrelowe and Trene, the third part of the Manor of Seynclere, the castle, town and lordship of Kylgarran. The King grants licence for him to enfeoff certain persons of the same to hold to themselves and their heirs until they have levied the sum in which he is at present indebted will be for life.

1421, 21 July. (PATENT ROLL (Cal. p. 389).)

Commission of oyer and terminer to William Cheyne in the county of Pembroke etc.

1433, 8 July Westminster. (PATENT ROLL 11 Henry VI m.1.pt 2 (Cal pp. 298-299).)

On 3 September, in his first year, (1413) Henry V granted to the present king's Uncle, Humphrey duke of Gloucester, by the name of Humphrey de Lancastre, the alien priory of Pembroke in tail during the war with France; and by other letters patent, dated at Leicester 16th May in the second year, he advanced him to be earl of Pembroke and then duke of Gloucester for his life, with £20 a year to support his estate as earl and £40 a year to support his estate as duke, out of the issues of the county of Pembroke by the hands of the sheriff. Afterwards on 21 May in the eighth year, peace was made between the king and Charles, king of France, whereby and by virtue of an ordinance made in Parliament at Leicester, in 2 Henry V, the said alien priory of Pembroke, not being conventual and not having had any priors instituted or inducted would come into the king's hands. Now the said Humphrey has had no payment of the said sums of £20 and £40 or of any parcel thereof because Henry V had no issues by the hands of the sheriff of the county inasmuch as by letters patent dated 20th July in his first year, he granted to the said Humphrey in tail, amongst other things, the said county with all its issues and profits by the name of castle and lordship of Pembroke... with all franchises, regalities. liberties, fines ransoms, customs, knight's fees advowsons, fisheries, prises of wine and other profits accustomed. The king therefore, on surrender of the above named letter patent relative to the titles of earl and duke and to the said priory, by advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal and of the commonality of England in the present parliament grants to his said uncle, in tail male, the said styles, honours and names of earl of Pembroke and duke of Gloucester, with £20 a year to maintain his estate as earl and £40 a year to maintain his estate as duke, form the said 16 May 2 Henry V out of the issues and revenues of the said priory of Pembroke, Grant to him also during pleasure the said priory with all lands, tenements, rents services, possessions, pensions, portions, fees, advowsons, franchises, liberties and other profits to the same belonging, he finding four chaplains to celebrate divine service everyday in the said priory and paying to Hortonk van Clux, "chivaler", the £50 a year granted to him by Henry IV, henceforward and as from the aforesaid 21 May.

By King and Council in Parliament.

(Humphrey, duke of Gloucester died without heir of his body and then according to Patent Roll 21 Henry vi pt 2 m1 dated 1443 27 Feb and 26 Henry vi pt 2 m9 William de la Pole earl of Suffolk and Alice his wife were given the titles of earl and countess of Pembroke and the estates in tail male - for a contemporary copy of these letters patent see Harl. Ch, 51 H 10 (Brit. Museum).

1436, 18 April. (PATENT ROLL 4 Henry VI, pt. 2, m21 (Cal., p. 583).)

Mandate to all bailiffs and others to permit Godfrey Culmer, born in Almain, dwelling in Tynby in Wales, who has taken an oath of fealty to inhabit the realty peaceably and enjoy his goods.

1438.

England beyond Wales.

William Messenger of the parish of Uzmaston born about 1438 a former minstrel in the household of the Earl of Wiltshire when his disposition was taken regarding disposition of land in 1518 (21st July) in the document reference is made to the Earl saying "but that it was Yngland beyond Walys".

(The document is an unpublished one in the Public Records Office London).

1440, 20 August. (PATENT ROLL 18 Henry VI pt. 3 m 8d (Cal., p. 451).)

Commission of oyer and terminer to Humphrey, duke of Gloucester, justice of South Wales, William Burley and William Perkyns in the counties of Kermerdyn, Cardygan and Pembroke touching all offences whether of the time of the late or present king.

1441.

Humphrey duke of Gloucester gave Pembroke Priory as a cell to St Alban's abbey.

1442.

St Mary's parish church of Tenby was presented with the priory of Monkton by the Earl of Pembroke to his friend the Abbot of St Albans who passed the church on to his sisters in the Convent of St Mary de la Pre. Founded by King John for the health of his own, his ancestors and his heirs souls and built for God, lepers and diseased women in a meadow near St Albans

1443, 27 February. (PATENT ROLL, 21 Henry VI, pt. 2m 1 cont. (Cal. p. 198).)

Grant to William de la Pole, earl of Suffolk, and Alice his wife, that if Humphrey, duke of Gloucester die without heir of his body, they shall have the title of earl and countess of Pembroke to them and their heirs, grant also to them of the remainder of the castles and lordships of Pembrok, Tenby and Kilgaren, and the commutes of Estrelawe, Treyne and Seynclere in Wales which the said duke and Eleanor his wife now hold to them and the heirs of the duke's body to hold to them and the heirs of their bodies, with knight's fees, advowsons of churches, franchises, royalties, liberties, prises of wines, fines and amercements and other profits.

1447.

Nicholas de Carew held lands in Angle of Edward de Shirburn, "by military service and suit of Edwards Court at Nangle".

1447, 16 July. (PATENT ROLL 25 Henry VI, pt 2, m9 (Cal., pp. 77-8).)

Whereas Humphrey, late Duke of Gloucester, seised of the manor of Bonecombe in the isle of Wight, co. Southampton, in his demesne as of fee or fee tail, claiming of late on undue information one John Whithorne of Wiltshire, 'gentilman', as his bondman belonging, to the said manor, caused the said John and all his lands, to be seised into his hands and John himself to be brought to Pembroke Castle in Wales and there imprisoned in so dark a dungeon and in such misery and lack off food and clothing for seven years and more, that he lost the sight of his eyes and he suffered other incurable ills .....

1448, 2 June. (PATENT ROLL , 26 Henry VI pt 2 m 14(Cal., p. 174).)

Grant to William de la Pole, marquis of Suffolk and earl of Pembroke whom the king this day has created Earl of Suffolk and Alice his wife in tail male heirs of the castles and lordships of Pembrok, Tenby and Kylgaren and the commotes of Estrelawe,Treylle and Seynclere in Wales and the castle and lordship of Lanstephan in Wales and the chancellor shall have power to amend any defects in these presents; in lieu of grants to the same of the premises by letters patent dated 28 November, 20 Henry VI, 27 February, 21 Henry VI, and 3 March, 25 Henry VI, surrendered.

1450, 19 May. (PATENT ROLL, 28Henry VI,pt 2, m. 22 (Cal., p. 326).)

Grant for life to Thomas Perot, knight, of the office of steward of the lordship of Pembrok in South Wales, with the usual wages, fees and profits etc.

1450, 2 June. (PATENT ROLL, 28 Henry VI, pt. 2, m 14 (Cal, p 337).)

Grant for life to the king's knight, Richard Vernon, of the offices of sheriff of the county of Pembroke, constable of Pembrokc and Tenby Castles, master-forester of Caydrath and steward of the lordship of Lanstaffan Ustenley and Seyncler, with the usual wages, fees and profits.

1450, 8 October. (PATENT ROLL (Cal., p. 405).)

Walter Gorfen, appointed auditor in the county of Pembroke etc.

1450.

ROT. PARL., V, p. 175.

Assignment of certain revenues to defray the expenses of the king's household, including among other revenues, the yearly farm of the lordship of Pembroke with its appurtenances £460.

1451, 7 April. (PATENT ROLL 29 Henry VI pt1, m 7d (Cal. p445).)

Commission appointed to survey the true yearly value of the county castle and lordship of Pembroke, etc.

1451, 25 June. (PATENT ROLL, 29 HenryVI pt. 2, m 10 . (Cal. 463).)

Grant for life to John Vernon, esquire, son of Richard Vernon, knight, of the offices of sheriff of the county of Pembroke, constable of Pembroke and Tynby Castles, master forester of Cadrath and steward of the lordships of Lanstaffan, Ustenley Seyn-clyer and Traney, to hold himself or by deputies, with the usual wages, fees and profits, in lieu of a like grant thereof to Richard by letters patent, surrendered.

1454. (ROT. PARL., if, pp. 260-1.)

Confirmation to Jasper, Earl of Pembroke, of divers castles and manors, etc., including the County, Castle, and Lordship of Pembroke with its members and appurtenances, to wit:

The hundred and lordship of Castle Martin.

The lordship of St. Fflorence.

The Lordship and Forest of Coydrath.

The Castle, Lordship and Town of Tenby.

The lordship and bailiwick of West Pembroke and East Pembroke.

The Bailwicks of Dongleddy, Rous, and Kemmeys.

Half the Ferry of Burton.

With all their appurtenances, viz., rents of assize and gabe rent value yearly £196 3s 7d besides reprisals issues and profits of wind and water mills value yearly £30 13s 4d; profits of coal at Coydrath, 43s 4d; customary tenants in the forrest of Codrath, 52s; the issues and profits of the towns of Pembroke and Tenby £8 3s 7d; the profits of half the ferry of Burton, 16s 10d; profits and perquisites of the Hundred and County Courts held annually, £13 14s 6d; do. escheats, reliefs, and divers, other casual receipts, £26 13s 6d; prises of wines in the ports of Milford and Tenby and elsewhere in the county, £6. 13s 6d;

(confiscated 10 Aug 1461 Patent Roll 1 Edward IV pt 3 m 26d (Cal p99) [suspect there is was an earlier commission dated at York on 9th May 1461]. given to Richard duke of Gloucester 1462 12 Aug Patent Roll 2 Edward iv pt 1 m5 - see below)

1457, 28 January.

Henry Tudor born at Pembroke Castle.

Edmund Tudor had married Lady Margaret Beaufort she about 13 he died in captivity in Carmarthen Castle in 1456. His brother Jasper Tudor, Earl of Pembroke, took Margaret to Pembroke Castle. She was pregnant and the baby born was future Henry VII.

Ancestry linked him to the royal house of Plantaganet although he had no direct claim to the throne. His mother was the great granddaughter of Edward III 's son John of Gaunt by his marriage to Catherine Swynford. She had been his mistress for many years and after the death of his second wife he married her and by a special decree enacted during Richard IIís reign all their children were declared legitimate with the promise that none should ever succeed to the throne of England.

He was descended through his father from Ednyfed Vaughan, Llywelyn Fawr's seneschal. His grandfather, Owen Tudor of Anglesey, squire of the Body to King Henry V, and Clerk of the Wordrobe to the Queen Dowager, Katherine de Valois, whom he married secretly in 1425. They lived together for 11 years and had 5 children including Jasper and Edmund. In 1436 marriage was discovered. She was sent to Bermondsey Abbey where she died within the year; her children were cared for by the Nuns of Barking. Owen was betrayed and imprisoned in Newgate, he escaped and returned to Anglesey till Henry VI came of age when he and Jasper fought for Henry at the Battle of Mortimers Cross. Henry and the Lancastrians were defeated. Owen was captured and beheaded at Hereford but Jasper escaped. Jasper and Edmund had been declared legitimate by the Act of Parliament. Edmund was created Earl of Richmond, Jasper became Earl of Pembroke.

(Henry Tudor was educated at Monkton Priory by the monks but at the age of 12 had to flee abroad.)

1461.

Abbot Whethanstede of St Albanís Abbey procured a confirmation of the grant of Pembroke Priory from King Edward IV who again confirmed the gift in the 27th year of his reign.

1461, 10 August. (PATENT ROLL, 1 Edward IV, pt. 3, m. 26d (Cal.,p 99).)

Commission to William Herbert, knight, lord Herbert, Thomas Herbert, esquire of the body, John Herbert and Hugh Huntley, to take into the king's hands the county and lordship of Pembroke with its appurtenances in England and Wales and the marches of Wales and all castles, lordships, manors, lands and possessions late of Jasper, earl of Pembroke, a rebel with power to appoint stewards, constables, receivers, auditors and other bailiffs.

1462, 3 February. (PATENT ROLL, 1 Edward IV, pt. 4, m. 16 (Cal., p. 114).)

Grant to William Herbert, king's knight, lately raised to the state of baron, and the heirs of his body, for his good services against Henry VI. Henry duke of Exeter, Jasper, earl of Pembroke, James, earl of Wilts, and other rebels, of the castle, town and lordship of Pembroke, the hundred and lordship of Castlemartyn, the lordship of St. Florence; the lordship and forest of Coydrath, the castle, lordship and town of Teneby, the lordship and bailiwick of Westpembroke and Estpembroke, the bailiwick of Dongledy, Rous and Kemeys, a moiety of the passage of Burton, the castle, town and lordship of Kilgarran, the lordships and manors of Emlyn, Meinordyve, Diffymbriam. the forest of Kevendryn, the castle, lordship and town of Lanstephan, the lordship and manor of Penrys and la Verie with the lordships and manors of Osterlowe, Trayne Clynton and St. Clear, the lordships and manors of Magoure and Redwyke, the castle, manor, town and lordship of Caldecote with appurtenances in South Wales and the marches, the castle and manor of Goderiche and the lordship and manor of Urchinfeld with appurtenances in the march of Wales and the county of Hereford, and the manor and lordship of Walwenescastell in South Wales, late of James, earl of Wilts, and in the king's hand by reason of an act of forfeiture in Parliament at Westminster, 4 November, with all royal rights, franchises, liberties, courts, counties, hamlets, views of frank-pledge, cantreds, commotes, hundreds, fairs, markets, parks, warrens, knights fees, advowsons, wreck at sea and other profits, with all issues from 4 March last.

1462, 12 August. (PATENT ROLL, 2 Edward IV pt 1 m (Cal p 197).)

Grant to the king's brother Richard, duke of Gloucester, admiral of the sea, and the heirs of his body the county honour and lordship of Pembroke, with numerous specified rights and all apurtenances.

1467, 15 March. (PATENT ROLL, 6 Edward IV, pt. I, m 15 (Cal., p 515).)

General pardon to Richard Bennrayth of Pembroke, 'gentilman ', alias Richard Hugh of Monketon, co Pembloke, alias Richard Benet, of all offences committed by him before 8 October, I Edward IV.

1469, 17 November. (PATENT ROLL, 9 Edward IV, pt. 2, m 20 (Cal. p 175).)

Grant to the king's servant John Donne, one of the esquires of the body of the offices of steward of the castle, lordship and county of Pembroke etc.

1471.

Jasper and Henry Tudor defeated at Tewkesbury fled to Tenby then to France.

1474, 8 July. (PATENT ROLL, 14 Edward IV, pt1 m 8 (Cal, p. 454).)

Exemplification, at the request of John Scudamore, knight, of the tenours of the following:-

1] A Petition of the said John in the Parliament at Westminster, 6 October, 12 Edward IV, that whereas beginning of the reign he had the rule and the keeping of the Castle of Pembroke in South Wales, and the king appointed the lord Ferrers and Herbert to take deliverance of the castle in his name and the said John delivered up the castle to them and was admitted to the kings grace and notwithstanding this at the first Parliament of the king,, at Westminster, 4 November, l Edward IV, he was put in the Common bill of Attainder and afterwards his name was taken out of it, but nevertheless at the latter end of the said Parliament it was ordained that he was convicted of high treason and forfeit all his lands and possessions, saving only his life and his goods, although at the time he was at home in his country trusting to the promise of the said lords, the king should now ordain that the said Act and others should be in no way prejudicial to the said John, and that the latter should be restored to his possessions.

2] The response of the king, at the request of the Commons by authority of Parliament. - Soit fait come il est desiree.

3] A schedule (English) annexed to the said petition notifying that William, Lord Herbert, by the authority granted to him by letters of privy seal dated 13 May last past, has received the said Sir John Skydmore, knight, into the king's grace.

Pembroke, 30 September, X Edward IV.

[Rolls of Parliament, vi, 29.]

1477, 4 February.

Robertus etc. bishop, lord of Pebidiawke and Llawhaden, Hugh ap Owen chanter of the cathedral church of St David's, and the chapter of the same place, to all to whom etc. greeting.

Know ye that we of our unanimous assent and consent have given and by this our present writing confirmed to our beloved in Christ Henry Matteston the office of parker or keeper of the park of Lamphey and have made, ordained, and appointed, the said Henry parker or keeper of the same park during his life, to have, occupy and exercise the said office by himself or his sufficient deputy during his life as other parkers and keepers have been accustomed to do in the aforesaid office, taking thereto yearly from us and our successors bishops of the bishopric of St.David's for doing and exercising the aforesaid office 72s. of lawful money of England by the hands of the reeve of Lamphey for the time being, together with all the fees, commodities, and rewards, belonging or pertaining to the same office, at two terms of the year, namely at the feasts of Easter and St. Michael the Archangel, by equal portions. And if it happen that the aforesaid 72s be in arrear unpaid, in part or in the whole, at any feast named above, that then it shall well be lawful for the aforesaid Henry to distrain in all the messuages, lands, and tenements which we have in the lordship of Lamphey and carry away the distraints so taken and retain them until the aforesaid Henry during his life be satisfied in full of the aforesaid 72s together with all arrears thereof.

In witness whereof etc.

Dated in our Chapter House, 4 February, 1476-77, 16 Edward IV.

1480.

According to the Wallingford Registry of St Albans Monastery Hertfordshire it appears that the Abbot of St Albans was at that date patron of the following Rectories and Vicarages in Pembrokeshire:

Rectoria de Tyneby,

Rectoria de Angulo,

Rectoria de Porterawharn,

Rectoria de Cranwer,

Vicaria de Monkton,

Vicaria de Castre Martini,

Vicaria de Sancti Michaeltis, Pembrochie.

The Mayor and Burgesses of Tenby were granted leave to nominate two chaplains in the parish church of Crownweare, with the donation of the hermitage of St David's near Pembroke.

1482.

According to entries in the register of Richard Martyn, Bishop of St Davidís he visited Pembroke Priory in the autumn of that year.

1482, 10 October.

On 10 October at Monkton by Pembroke in the year as above R. (Richard Martyn) Bishop of St Davidís beforesaid collated to one Peter David the perpetual vicarage of the church of the blessed Mary Cairiw, vacant and in his collation by lapse etc. And he had letters etc.

1482, 5 November.

On the fifth day of the month aforesaid, at Llanafan-fawr, the vicarage of the parish church of Carew vacant by the resignation of Sir John Watkyn last vicar there and in the said reverend fatherís collation, was collated to Sir David Veynor.

1482. (ROT. PARL., V, a. 203a.)

Touching an exchange of lands between William Herbert's heir and the Prince of Wales including the earldom of Pembroke and its appurtenances which for the time were to be annexed to the Duchy of Cornwall.

1483, 16 May. (PATENT ROLL, I Edward V, m3 (Cal p 349-50).)

Grant for life to the king's kingsman Henry, duke of Buckingham, of the offices of constable of the castle and town of Tonebigh, co. Pembroke, the castle and lordship of Kylgarran in South Wales, the castle and town of Llan Stephan in South Wales, constable, steward, treasurer and receiver of the castle, county, lordship and manor of Pembroch in South Wales receiving the accustomed fees for himself as William Herbert, late earl of Pembroke or any other had in the said offices and for the soldiers and archers in the said castles and grant to him, so long as the king's uncle Richard, duke of Gloucester, or anyone else shall be protector of the realm during the king's minority, of the power of appointing sheriffs and escheators in the counties of Pembroke all bailiffs, parkers and servants of the king in North and South Wales, and attorneys of the law in any of his courts there, butlers and customers in the ports of Teneibie, in the said county of Pembroke and all other officers, servants and ministers of the king in South and North Wales and the Marches, and of the power of appointing to all vacant offices in the same not granted to him above. And grant to him for life of the governance and supervision of all the kings subjects in South and North Wales and the Marches.

1483. (HARL. MS. 6079, f 156b.)

Order of the king's Council to Henry Wogan, treasurer of Pembroke, to deliver out of the first revenues of his office £I00 to be employed for the ' stuffe ' of the said castle, and also 20 marks for other small things necessary to be purveyed there.

1483. (HARL. MS. 433, f. 164.)

Warrant to Richard Mynours, chamberlain of Carmarthen, to pay £113 14s 6d to Richard Newton for the expenses incurred by him on the castle of Pembroke.

1483.

The presentation of the Church of Tenby, at the instance of the Lord Richard, Duke of Gloucester, was promised to Master Roger Hanley at the next vacancy

1484, 21 July. (HARL. MS. 433 f. 184.)

Warrant to the Forester of Narberth to deliver to Richard Williamís, constable of Pembroke, as much fuel and burning wood as shall be by his direction thought necessary to be used in the said castle, and to permit the persons assigned by him to fell and carry away the said wood from time to time.

1484, 11 January. (PATENT ROLL, 1 Richard III, pt. 3, m 15 (Cal.. p 414).)

Grant for life to the king's servant, Richard Williams, esquire, one of the ushers of the kingís chamber of the offices of constable and steward of the kings castle, town and lordship of Pembroke with their members in South Wales, constable of the castle of Tynby, chief forester of the forest of Coydrath, constable and steward of the castle, town, and lordship of Cilgarren with the office of steward of the lordship of Llan-stephan and Trayne, with authority to appoint clerks of the court and porters, with the accustomed fees from the issues of the lordship of Pembroke executing the office of constable of the castle of Pembroke in person.

1484, 12 February. (PATENT ROLL, 1 Richard IlI. pt. 3, m 19 (Cal., p 410).)

Grant for life to the king's servant, John White the elder of the town of Tenibie and his assigns of all the lands, meadows and pastures by and within the town called 'lez Demaynes', 'Fugatif Londes', 'Watellvyashyll', and 'Rigons Close', with two wind mills called 'lez Wynde Mylles', and a water mill called Ďle water wynch mylle', with all appurtenances to hold to the value of £10 yearly, rendering to the king a red rose at the feast of St. Peter ad Vincula, provided that he sufficiently repair the premises.

1484, 25 September. (PATENT ROLL, 2 Richard III pt.1 m 15 (Cal, p 474).)

Appointment during pleasure, from Michaelmas next, of the kings servants William Mistelbroke and Richard Lussher as auditors of all accounts of officers and ministers of the king's castles, wardships, manors, towns, hundreds, lands and other possessions of this principality of South Wales in the counties of Kermerdyn and Cardigan and the Castle of Pembroke.

1484, 20 December. (PATENT ROLLS, 2 Richard II , pt. 2, m. 19 (Cal., p. 501).)

Grant to the king s servant, Richard Williams and the heirs male of his body for his good service against the rebels, of the castle, manor or lordship of Manerbere and Pennalee with its members co. Pembrolie of the yearly value of £100 to hold with knight s fees and all its appurtenances by knight service and a rent of £7 10s yearly.

1484.

Grant to the Mayor and Burgesses of Tenby, and their successors, of the nomination of two fit and proper persons as chaplains of the church and parish of Cronwere whenever the living is vacant. If the emoluments do not amount to eight marks per annum, the mayor and burgesses to make it up. Also to the hermitage of St. Daniel's, the lands, oblations and emoluments, the proceeds of which are to be applied for the relief of the poor. To be used for no other purpose than as hermitages.

1484, May 31.

Presentation of Dominus Richard Langshawe, chaplain to the Abbot of St Albanís, who was presented to the Rectory of Tenbie, vacated by the resignation of Magister John Hunden, S.T.P., late Bishop of Llandaff.

1484.

John Morton, Cardinal Archbishop of Canterbury, obtained a bull from Pope Alexander VI authorising him to visit and inspect the religious houses.

1484.

The archbishop of Canterbury found that the Abbess of St Mary de la Pre, Elena Germyn, was married, separated and mistress of Father Thomas Sudbury a member of the church and the convent was run as a brothel.

1485, August 1.

Henry Tudor landed at Dale.

1485. (Henry VII's letters of Denizenship and Charters of Enfranchisement).

Following his victory over Richard III; Henry VII rewarded many of his Welsh followers with letters of denizenship (admittance of foreigners to a resident's rights), giving them the rights and privileges of Englishmen and they were no longer subject to the penal laws of Henry IV which applied to the Welsh.)

1486, 29 April.

On 29 April 1486 in Haverford priory, the said reverend father Hugh bishop of St Davidís collated to one Sir John Rogeres chaplain the perpetual vicarage of the parish church of St Winnoc, vacant and in his collation by lapse as has been found in his visitation. And he had letters in due form.

1486, June 2.

On June 2 in the same year, in the manor of Lantfey, one Sir Thomas Williams , chaplain was admitted to the perpetual vicarage of the parish church of the Blessed Mary Kairiw, vacant by the death of the Sir Peter Toker last vicar there, on the presentation of master Hugh Raglan rector of the said church. And he had letters in the usual form.

1486, June 20.

On the 20 June in the same year, at the manor of Lantfey, Sir John ap Res was admitted to the vicarage of the church of the Blessed Mary Tenby vacant by the death of Sir Philip Smyth and in the presentation of Sir Richard Langshaw, rector of the same church, patron of the said vicarage.

1486, 30 July.

On 30 July 1486 at Lamphey a letter, the tenour of which follows, was exhibited to H. bishop of St. Davids.

To the venerable father in Christ etc. the bishop St David's or his vicar general in spiritualities.

Julian by the mercy of the Lord bishop of Ostia sendeth greeting and sincere charity in the Lord. A petition offered unto us on behalf of Walter ap John of Stacorse layman of your diocese contained that by the instigation of the devil he lately killed one Roger Walter, priest of the said place, his Spiritual father who had baptized one of his sons, on which account he falls under the sentence of excommunication pronounced in general terms against such as do these things, upon which things he has caused supplication to be humbly made, setting forth the same, for a due remedy to be mercifully provided for him by the apostolic see. We therefore by authority of the lord pope the care of whose penitentiary we bear and by his special mandate upon this made to us by the oracle of the living voice commit to your prudence that if this is so when he shall have gone by all the larger churches of that place where so great a crime was perpetrated, naked and unshod with only his breeches on, bearing a rod in his hand, and a yoke about his neck if he can with safety and caused himself to be beaten before the doors of the churches aforesaid and with the priests of the same singing a penitential psalm, when the multitude of the people in these is greatest, publicly confessing his sin, and when he shall have adequately satisfied, if he have not already done so, the church which the murdered priest served, and when he and his heirs have been deprived for ever of any fee or right of patronage he hold of the church (and lest the memory of the punishment be too short let his children on this account be deemed incapable of holding an ecclesiastical benefice unless with them there be a merciful dispensation upon this by the apostolic see, you shall absolve this layman from the said sentence and such guilt and excess of priesticide in the accustomed form of the church and enjoin on him therefore by the authority aforesaid, such penance as may be to him for salvation and to others for terror.

Dated at Rome at St. Peter under the seal of the office of the penitentiary 21 April, 4 Innocent VIII.

1486, 13 August.

On 13 August 1486 at the castle of Lawhaden the aforementioned reverend father granted power and licence to Master John Kidwely, rector of Cronwer of the diocese of St Davidís to exchange his benefice with any benefice within the realm of England: and this by word of mouth.

1486, 17 November.

On 17 November in the year as above, at the manor of Lantfey of the diocese of St. Davidís, Master John David otherwise Kidwely of the diocese of St. David's, rector of the parish church of St.Telion Cronwere of the diocese of St. David's, and Master John Tudir rector of the parish church of Hampstede Marchall of the diocese of Salisbury, surrendered their said benefices in the hands of the reverend father Hugh bishop of St. Davidís, because of an exchange to be made, which bishop indeed after the causes of the exchange had been heard examined, and plenarily discussed, and found to be true and lawful and approved, by his own authority as well as that of Thomas, by divine permission

bishop of Salisbury, committed to him in this behalf (of which commission the tenour appears below), admitted the aforesaid Master John Tudir to the parish church of St. Telion, Cronwere of the aforesaid diocese of St. David's, and Master John Kidwely to the parish church of Hampstede Marchall of the diocese of Salisbury, and canonically instituted them in the same, Master John Tudir on the presentation of the religious man William abbot of the monastery of St. Albans of the diocese of Lincoln, and Master John Kidwely on the presentation of the king. And they had letters of which the tenours follow:-

Hugh etc. to our beloved in Christ Master John David otherwise Kidwely of our diocese, priest greeting etc.

Having regard to the merits of thine uprightness, that thou mayest hereafter bear fruit in the church of God, we admit thee to the parish church of Hampstede Marchall vacant by the free resignation of Master John Tudir last and immediate rector of the same; and we institute thee in the person of Sir John Vernon, rector of Stacpole of our diocese, thy proctor, canonically, as perpetual rector rectcr etc.

Dated in our manor of Lantfey 17 November.

Hugh etc. to our beloved in Christ Master John Tudir, bachelor in decrees, greeting etc. Having regard we admit thee to the parish church of St. Telion Cronwere, of our diocese, vacant at the presentation of William abbot etc., and we institute thee perpetual rector of the said church and invest thee canonically in the same etc.

Dated as above.

1486, 10 November.

Acts before the reverend father Hugh aforesaid in his manor of Lantfey of the diocese of St Davids had and begun on 10 November in the year as above and continued day by day in a Pembroke cause of an error or heretical pravity against one Sir Roger Burley of Ireland then present For which Sir Roger indeed the same reverend father - because Sir Roger himself as the said father asserted on the relation of faithful men had been and is notoriously and in manifold ways defamed with him and evidently and on probable conjectures suspected of and upon divers errors, opinions, and articles savoring of heresy met expressly contrary to the determination of holy mother church by himself Sir Roger held and publicly spoken and preached, as was said - peremptorily fixed, appointed, and assigned a day on Saturday next after the feast of the Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary next then following namely 9 December then next, to appear before the same reverend father in the chapel of the Blessed Virgin Mary situated within the said manor of Lantfey to answer upon such errors, opinions, and articles, as is aforesaid, then to be objected against him to the mere correction of his soul, of the mere office of the said reverend father and also on information, and further to do and receive in that behalf what shall be just, there being then present there Master Richard Gely canon of Abergwilly college, and William, prior of Pill, with other discreet men besides who were there. When indeed the Saturday abovesaid was come, the same Sir Roger the Irishman appeared for trial in person in chapel aforesaid before the said reverend father then sitting in judgment for a tribunal and thereupon the same Sir Roger when required made oath on the most holy gospels to the said reverend father in regard to speaking the truth and answering faithfully upon all points then to be objected against him and enquired of from him concerning and savouring of the matter of errors or heresy. Against this Sir Roger the Irishman indeed, so sworn, for the mere correction of his soul the same reverend father of his office objected and articled the articles underwritten. Which articles indeed follower and are these;

First of all that the same Sir Roger in presence of one Master John ap Ris in the house of Nicholas White of Pembroke there being then present there the said Nicholas White and his wife Katharine by name Thomas Tyler of Tenby and John Baret with some others then present, publicly arguing with the said Master John said that he would and could make the Lord's body in the time of the mass for those present and for himself those bones would be bread alone. Also that contrariwise he would at his pleasure sometimes make it as far as related to himself and not to those present Which articles indeed, together with other errors besides obstinately adhered to there in the presence of those afore written, he then confessed that he had said, which errors, truly, together with all errors against the faith and definition of the Holy Roman church, in writing, before the reverend father aforesaid and his commissary there namely Master Lewis ap Owen, doctor of decrees and archdeacon of Cardigan, with all the others then called to this, he publicly abjured in form following:-

In the name of God, Amen!

I, Sir Roger, chaplain, now of the diocese of St. David's, before you Hugh etc. Those heresies and errors which of late before Master John ap Res and others then present I obstinately asserted and cherished in the house of Nicholas White at Pembroke etc. I verily abjure and the said erroneous articles and all other articles whatsoever, erroneous and contrary to the holy faith, and all heresies, here in these writings and expressly, I humbly and devoutly renounce, supplicating the reverend fatherhood to deign to impart unto me the benefit of absolution from every sentence of excommunication passed by the holy fathers against such wanderers, subjecting me to every correction and reformation whatsoever adequate to and of right required on account of the premises. And him the said reverend father absolved in due form of law and enjoined on him a fitting penance in that behalf which he faithfully fulfilled publicly in the church of St. Mary, Pembroke.

1487, 23 January.

On 23 January in the year as above at Lantfey Sir Thomas Johannis, chaplain , presented to the parish church of St Mary Jordanston of the archdeaconry of St Davidís had a commission directed to the dean of Pebidiawke to enquire of the right of patronage of the same then claimed by one Sir William Somour pretending himself patron for this turn in right of a feoffment made to him in the lands of one Elizabeth Wiriot in the same parish; and of the merits of the presentee and the other articles accustomed and if such inquisition sufficiently found for the presenter and the presented to admit the said Sir Thomas to the said Church and induct him into corporal possession of the same and receive the canonical obedience of the same; and to certify what he does in the premises.

1487, 31 January.

Hugh etc. to Sir David Nant, rector of the parish church of Lawrenny of our diocese greeting etc.

Inclining to the prayers poured forth to us on this behalf that for three years to be numbered continuously from the date of these presents thou mayest absent thyself from thy church aforesaid in some university or in some study of letters or service and for all the time afore-said mayest let thy abovesaid church at farm, we for certain and lawful causes, by the tenour of the presents, impart to thee such licence, provided nevertheless that in the meantime thy same church be laudably served in divine things and the cured souls be diligently exercised in the same and that thou leave a proctor there who in thy absence shall answer to us and all thy other ordinaries interested in thy stead.

Dated at Lantfey 31 January in the year as above.

1487, 17 March.

On 17 March aforesaid at the manor of Lantfey one Sir Robert Smyth, chaplain was admitted to the parish church of Angle vacant by the death of Master Alexander Kyng, last rector there; on the presentation of William abbot of the exempt monastery of St Alban the protomartyr of the English, of the diocese of Lincoln, true patron of the said church because of the priory of Pembroke. And he had letters etc.

1487, 22 March. (PATENT ROLL, 2 Henry VII pt.1 (Cal p 155).)

Grant for life to the kingís mother Margaret Countess of Richmond inter alia, of the lordships and manors of Manorbere and Pennally in South Wales.

1487, 10 May.

On 10 May at the manor of Lantfey, one Sir William Mendes then vicar of Lantfey aforesaid was admitted to the free chapel of Hogeston vacant by the death in the course of nature of Sir Philip Persivall last warden of the same; on the presentation of William Perrot of Scotsbourgh, then sole and true patron of the same as was fully proved by an inquisition made in that behalf. And he had letters of induction in the usual form.

1487, 15 May.

On the 15th day of the same month in the above said place, one Sir Richard Barret, chaplain, of the diocese of St. David's, was admitted to the parish church of Talbenny in Ros, vacant by the death of Sir Philip Persivall last rector of the same; on the presentation of Master John ap Res patron of the same church for this turn in right of Margaret his wife as lady of Talbenny and Howeliston in Ros, as was then clean by an inquisition thereof taken by faithful clerks and laymen having the best knowledge (This John ap Res and his wife indeed afterwards lost in the king's court upon the right of patronage of the said church).

1487, 7 September.

On 7 September in the year abovesaid at Lantfey, Sir John Rowth, chaplain, was admitted by the oft named reverend father to the perpetual vicarage of the parish church of Camros vacant by the resignation of Sir John David last vicar there and in the gift of the prior and convent of the priory of St. Thomas the Marty, Haverford; and he had the necessary letters thereof. And the same reverend father weighing the poverty and old age of the said Sir John also assigned a yearly pension from the fruits of the said vicarage namely 7 marks of sterlings to be paid by equal portions at the four terms of the year, the assignment and form of which pension appear more lucidly in letters of the said reverend father made in that behalf and sealed and being with the said Sir John David the resigning vicar with the addition of a penalty if the said pension be not paid quarterly to the said Sir John so long as he be dwelling among mankind or be alive, the first payment beginning on Christmas Day next and so continuing annually thence-forward.

1487, 22 September.

On 22 September as above, at Lantfey, the reverend father aforesaid granted licence for William Batemon of the town of Haverford and Lewis Waren of the said town to have an oratory anywhere within the diocese of St Davidís so that any chaplain may celebrate masses for them when required.

1487, 13 September.

Hugh etc. to Masters David Wogan canon of our cathedral church of St. David's, and Richard Gely canon of our college of Abergwilly, greeting etc. To have cognizance, to proceed, to decree, and to decide finally, in a matrimonial cause which one David Tailour of the parish of St. Mary, Pembroke, of our diocese intends to move before us against Joneta Raymond of the said parish and to determine the cause itself by a due and canonical end, with the things arising out of, depending on, incidental to and connected with it, to you in whose prudence and industry we have full confidence in the Lord, jointly and severally, we commit our functions with the power of every canonical coercion whatsoever, commanding that of the whole process to be had before you in this behalf, when the cause is determined, you, or one of you, certify us distinctly and openly by letters patent sealed with an authentic seal. Dated in Lamphey manor 13 September, 1487 etc.

1488, 4 January.

On 4 January 1488 at the priory of Carmarthen, by Thomas prior of the Priory of St John the Evangelist, Carmarthen and master Lewis Johannis, then vicars general of the reverent father Hugh etc, he himself being then in distant parts, Master John Talley was admitted to the parish church of Narberth then vacant by the death of Master John ap Howell last rector there; on the presentation of Res ap Thomas knight found by inquisition to be then patron of the same.

1488, 12 February.

Henry etc. to H. bishop of St. David's, greeting.

We command you that you do not for any liberty omit to enter and cause to be levied for us of goods,

benefices, and ecclesiastical possessions, of the underwritten churches in your diocese the sums written by parcels below, namely:

of the church of Jeffreyston, 15s.;

of the church of Tenby, 50s.;

of the church of Carew, £6.;

of the church of Lambston, 9s.;

of the church of Stackpole Bosher, 24s.;

of the church of Marioes, 44s.;

of the church of Newmoat, 14s.;

of the church of Steynton, 54s.;

of the church of Granston, 16s.;

of the church of Fishguard, 24s:

of the church of Maenclochog, 20s.;

of the church of Roch, 10s.;

of the church of St. Bride, 40s.;

of the church of Pwllcrochan, 30s.;

of the church of .Narberth, 48s.;

of the church of Burton, 24s.;

of the church of Angle, 24s.;

of the church of Rhoscrowther, 40s.;

of the church of Manorbier 40s.;

of the church of St. Florence, 40s.;

of the church of the town of Cosheston 44s.;

of the church of Herbrandston, 20s.;

of the church of Stackpole Elider, 40s.;

of the tenth and moiety of a tenth granted to Sir Edward IV late king of England by the clergy of the province of Canterbury, in the fourteenth year of his reign in the archdeaconry of St. Davidís; and of the goods and chattels, lands and tenements of the prior of Haverford in your said diocese cause to be levied £9 11s 11d one half-penny, one farthing, likewise due to us of the same tenth and moiety for his spiritualities and temporalities: so that you have those pence at our Exchequer at Westminster on the morrow of the Ascension of the Lord to be paid to us there. And have there then this writ. Witness W. Hody, knight, at Westminster, 12 February in the third year of our reign. By the Great Roll of the first year of Richard III, in Hereford, and By the barons.

1488, 20 March.

On 20 March in the above year in the parish church of Lantfey, before the Reverend father Hugh etc. then sitting there for judgement, with some learned in the law as assessors with him, one Stephen Hall of the parish of St. Michael, Pembroke, cited and accused by one Master Hasley, then rector of St. Florence, also present there, of heretical pravity maintained publicly by the said Stephen in the presence of some in the house of James Toker at Pembroke, appeared personally and, being there sworn to answer to interrogatories and interrogated, confessed among other things that, on Monday after Quinquagesima Sunday last, in the house of the afore-said James, in the presence of Master Hasley and some others there, he burst forth in these words, namely that the Second Person in the Godhead, our Redeemer, was not omnipotent before his resurrection from the dead and that, as he asserted, he has heard from the preaching of Master Smyth late archdeacon of St. David's and bishop of Llandaff and not of his own invention or wit: and this article indeed with all other erroneous articles and heresies he then abjured in writing, promising also that henceforward he would never maintain such and this in form following:-

In the name of God, Amen!

I Stevyn Hall of Seint Michaellís pishe in Pebroke here afor you Hiw by the grace of God bishoppe of Seint David that article by me erranyously holdyn and fortified befor Masta Hasley pson of Seint Florence late at Pembrok in the howse of Jamys Toker in grete audience that is to say tht the second pson in Tinite the Son of God oure redema was not oipotent befor his resurretion which article in especiall wt all other errores heresis and articlis contary to the detminacon of holy church by this my dede or writyng expsly renounce revoke and abjure mekely besechyng yo' revend fadreod in way of charite fro the censur of the church in which I stand in for my for offensis deon ayenst God and the church to assoyll me Submittyng myselfe for my for offens by me opynly holdyn to yo reformacon correccon and punyshment as the law of the church will to yor discrecon"

And after that he had been absolved in due form and a penance publicly laid upon him by the reverend father, the same abjured withdrew with letters containing his penance.

1488, 19 April.

On 19 April in the year above at Lamphey one Sir John Philip chaplain , was admitted by the aforesaid reverend father to the vacant perpetual vicarage of Martletwy on the presentation of the religious man Robert Evers, preceptor of Slebech, patron of the said vicarage. And he had letters etc.

1488, 5 May.

Hugh etc. to all to whom etc. Know that we the bishop mentioned have given, granted, and by this our present writing confirmed to the most potent and illustrious prince and lord Jasper brother and uncle of kings duke of Bedford and earl of Pembroke all our right of presenting, giving or collating, for the first turn next, and for one turn only, to the rectory or parish church of LLANDILO in Elwel of our diocese, whenever it shall happen to fall vacant by death, resignation, or cession, or in any other manner whatsoever; so that it shall be lawful for the said illustrious prince or his deputy to give and collate the said rectory with its rights, whenever it shall happen to fall vacant as is aforesaid, to any fit person, as quietly and entirely as we would do if this our present writing had not been made: and so that when any fit clerk whatsoever, as is aforesaid, shall be admitted and put in real and corporal possession of the said prebend with the pertinances the collation aforesaid shall from that time revert to us and our successors, our episcopal rights.

In witness whereof etc.

Dated 5 May in the year abovesaid.

1488, 8 May.

To all and singular etc. Hugh etc

Whereas we etc. to whom sole and entire the right of conferring the grammar schools in our city and diocese of St. David's as well of right as of custom is well known to pertain, have appointed our beloved in Christ Richard Smyth master in arts, chaplain in our church of the Blessed Mary, Haverford, of our diocese, to be master of the grammar schools in the said Haverford and to rule the same grammar schools, and to inform unlearned youths in grammar and the other liberal sciences, by the tenour of these presents, therefore, we inhibit and admonish, once, twice, and thrice, that no one put under or subject to us by diocesan right dare contrary to this our appointment to rule such schools in the said town of Haverford and any place within a circumference of seven miles of the same town without obtaining the licence of the aforesaid master, or in any wise whatsoever presume to attempt anything about the premises to the prejudice of the aforesaid Master Richard, under pain of contempt and the greater excommunication to be pronounced against contemners and violators of our present appointment.

In witness whereof etc.

Dated in our manor of Lamphey 8 May in the year etc.

1488, 10 December.

On 10 December in the year as above, at Lamphey there went out a commission by the reverend father directed to Robert, bishop of Worcester, to examine and plenarily discuss the causes of an exchange to be made between Masters Ralph rector of the parish church of Marteley of the diocese of Worcester and Edward Hasley rector of St. Florence of the diocese of St. David's and authorize the same exchange if the causes themselves should be found lawful; and to institute Master Ralph himself canonically to be rector of the said church of St. Florence with all its rights etc., to which he is presented by Jasper duke of Bedford etc. reserving his corporal induction and canonical obedience to Hugh aforesaid.

1489, 5 January.

On 5 January in the year above, at Lamphey by the reverend father aforesaid , Sir John Dier chaplain, was admitted to the vacant church of Manorbier, on the presentation of the venerable man Master Owen Pole, doctor of degrees, rector of the said church and patron of the said vicarage and canonically instituted in the same according to the form of the legatine constitutions published in this behalf. And he had letters etc.

1489, 17 January.

On 17 January, 1489, by the said vicar one Sir David Cole was admitted to the vicarage of Roche and instituted in the same according to the form of the legatine constitutions etc. the vicarage being then vacant by the resignation of Sir Thomas Pery last vicar there; on the presentation of the prior of Pill and the convent of the said house etc.

1489, 17 January.

The same day, in Carmarthen priory, one Master Ralph Barton admitted at another time to the parish church of St. Florence and instituted in the same by Robert, bishop of Worcester, by authority of a commission to him in that behalf of bishop Hugh before said to examine and discuss of and upon the cause of an exchange to be made between Master Hasley late rector of the said church of St. Florence and the said Master Barton with the church of Marteley of the diocese of Worcester, had a mandate to the archdeacon of St. David's to induct the same Master Barton into real and corporal possession of the said church of St. Florence with all its rights etc.

1489, 28 February.

Henry etc., king of England to Hugh etc., bishop of St Davidís greetings. Whereas you and the rest of the prelates and clergy of the province of Canterbury in the last convocation of prelates and such clergy, begun in the cathedral church of St Paul London on 14th January last and continued day by day to and on the 27th day of this present month of February, have granted unto us for the safeguard and defence of the church of England and this our realm of England a subsidy of £5000 to be levied under certain manner, form, and conditions, specified in your said grant and paid, to wit one moiety therof by 1 May next and the other moiety therof by 1 November next, of which subsidy indeed a certain portion assigned according to the tenour of the grant aforesaid upon your diocese amounts to the sum of £63 for one moiety; seeing that the levy and collection of such subsidy, so far as concerns that sum for the first term of payment and as much for the second term, pertains to you and your ministers, we command you that as is customary you cause some faithful men of the clergy for whom you are willing to answer to us to be assigned and deputed to levy and collect said subsidy at the terms aforesaid, certifying the treasurer and barons of our Exchequer clearly and openly of the names of those whom you shall depute for the levy and collection of the first moiety by 15 March next and those whom you shall likewise depute for the levy and collection of the second moiety of the same subsidy by 15 September next at the latest. And this in no wise omit as you love us and our honour. Witness myself at Westminster 28 February in the fourth year of our reign.

The names of the collectors of the first moiety of the great subsidy etc.

Collectors:

The prior of Great Malvern, in the archdeaconry of Brecon, in his collection, clear, for the king £19 2s 4d.

The abbot of Talley, in the archdeaconry of Carmarthen £11 12s 6 1/2d,

The prior of Monkton, Pembroke, in the archdeaconry of St Davidís £14,

The abbot of Vale Royal of the diocese of Coventry, in the archdeaconry of Cardigan £18 14s 6d,

Collectors of the smaller subsidy:

Master David Williams archdeacon of St Davidís in the archdeaconry of St Davidís,

Master John ap Morgan, archdeacon of Carmarthen, within the archdeaconry of Carmarthen,

Master Thomas ap Hoell, archdeacon of Cardigan within the archdeaconry of Cardigan,

Sir William Thomas, archdeacon of Brecon, within the said archdeaconry of Brecon,

Collectors of the smaller subsidy to be paid at the above term to the archbishop of Canterbury in the church of St Paul.

1489, 4 April.

On 4 April in the year aforesaid the reverend father admitted Lewis ap David, deacon to the parish church of Llys -y-fran vacant by the surrender of Sir Owen ap Griffith last rector there , and he was instituted in the same to which he was then presented by John Devereux, knight, lord Ferrers, John Malefaunt, John Perotte esquire and William Perotte of Scotsborough, true patrons of the said church.

1489, 14 November.

On 14 November in the year as above at Lantfey Sir John Baker was admitted to the perpetual vicarage of the parish church of St Martin otherwise called Castilmartyn and instituted etc., on the presentation of the prior of Monkton and the convent of the said house, the true patrons of the said vicarage then vacant by the resignation of Sir William Harres, last vicar there etc.,

1489, 6 April.

On 6 April, 1489, at Lamphey, bishop Hugh before-said admitted Sir William Leya to the parish church of Llangwm vacant by the resignation of Sir John Don last rector there, and he was instituted canonically in the same: on the presentation of Walter Garwey of Webley for this turn by reason of a grant of the right of patronage or the advowson of the same church made by John Devereux, knight, lord of Ferrers etc. and by John Langvill, true patrons of the said church. And it was written thereof to the archdeacon of St. David's as is usual saving a yearly pension of 6 marks payable quarterly in equal portions to the same John Don so long as he shall live , by the now rector aforesaid and his successors which pension the bishop limited with the consent of the aforesaid Sir William etc.

1489, 12 May.

On 12 May in the year aforesaid, at Lamphey the reverend father collated to one Sir John Tasker chaplain the perpetual vicarage of the parish church of St Leonard Rosemarket , vacant and in his collation by lapse; and he instituted him etc. And he had letters thereof etc.

1489, 19 May.

To all sons of Holy Mother Church inspecting these letters Hugh etc. sendeth greeting etc. It is meet that those things which are determined by an agreement, by judgment, or by arbitrament, in order that scruples of the contention reawakening may not recur, shall be strengthened by the support of the bishops of the places; for the cutting off of the matter for strife and the fostering of the beauty of peace. Seeing that some inhabitants of the town of Llawhaden of our diocese, namely the parishioners of the parish church of St. Hugh there, of the one part, by our beloved etc. Sir William Wilcok master or warden of our college of St. David's sufficiently appointed as their proctor for this as well as the inhabitants of the town or hamlet of Bletherstone within the precinct of the said parish of Llawhaden and well known to be of the same parish, by Master Richard Ph[ilip] rector of Herbrandston of our diocese their proctor, of the other part, namely on 19 May of the year written below, within the hall of our manor of Lamphey in the presence there of very many persons, of whom more below, together with David ap Thomas and Jankyn Ph[ilip] of the aforesaid town of Llawhaden, and of Bletherstone aforesaid, Griffin Gwyn and Philip Eliot, appointed then for and in the narne of the parishioners of the aforesaid parish, appeared before us, having the material of a long pending strife or dissension between them about the contribution of the said inhabitants of Bletherston to the remakings and repairs to be trade yearly as required in the aforesaid parish church of Llawhaden as well in the ornaments as in all other things whatsoever necessary there to be repaired and found by the parishioners of the same parish with one accord after and according to the form of a constitution .... Unfinished !!!!!.

1498, 26 May.

On 26 May in Carmarthen priory the reverend father admitted Sir David Philip, chaplain to the perpetual vicarage of the parish church of St Nicholas Pembroke, vacant by the resignation of Master Philip David last vicar there and in the presentation of the prior of St Nicholasís Pembroke. And thereof etc.

1489, 26 October.

On 26 October in the year abovesaid in the manor of Lantfey the aforesaid reverend father admitted the resignation by Master Richard Geffrey of the perpetual vicarage of New Moat then in fact made in his hands, and decreed the vicarage itself vacant from that time. in the presentation of the prior and convent of Pill, in the presence of Sir William, prior of Pill, and Master Guy ap Hoell.

1489, 12 November.

The same day and in the same place the aforesaid Sir Thomas Dewy was admitted to the parish church of St. David, Hubberston, in Ros and instituted in the same, then vacant by the death of Master Richard Gely last rector there, and in the presentation of the prior and convent of Pill, patrons.

1489, 14 November.

On 14 November in the year as above at Lantfey Sir John Baker was admitted to the perpetual vicarage of the parish church of St. Martin otherwise called Castilmartyn and instituted etc. on the presentation of the prior of Monkton and the convent of the said house, the true patrons of the said vicarage then vacant by the resignation of Sir William Harres, last vicar there etc.

1489, 28 November.

On 28 November at Lamphey Sir Walter Mabe, chaplain was admitted to and instituted in the parish church of Johnston in Roose then vacant by the resignation of Sir John Howell last rector there made and admitted; on the presentation of the prior and convent of Pill, true patrons of the said church. And he had letters.

1490, 15 June.

On 15 June in the year and place abovesaid (Llamphey) he collated to one Sir John Glover, chaplain, the perpetual vicarage of the parish church of Ambleston vacant and in his collation for this turn by lapse. And he instituted him etc.

1490,10 July.

On 10 July in the year and place abovesaid (Llamphey) he admitted one Sir Phillip ap Ieuan chaplain, to the perpetual vicarage of the parish church of St Martin Manorbier and instituted him in the same etc., then vacant by the resignation of Sir John Dyer last vicar there, on the presentation of Master Owen Pole rector of the same church. And Sir Philip had letters thereof etc.

1490, 19 October.

On 19 October in the year above at Llamphey Sir John Coke chaplain was admitted by the reverend etc., to the vicarage of Marloes and instituted in the same then vacant by the resignation of Sir Thomas Ewen last vicar there, on the presentation of the master and fellows of the college of St Davidís patrons of the said vicarage.

1490, 21 October.

On 21 October he collated to Sir John Makeram chaplain, the vicarage of Overam and instituted him in the same then vacant by the resignation of Sir John Coke last vicar there and in his collation.

1490, 25 October.

On the 25th day of the aforesaid month Sir William Powle, chaplain, was admitted to and instituted in the vicarage of Steynton then vacant by the death of Sir William Dodde last vicar there, on the presentation of the prior and convent of Pill, patrons of the vicarage.

1490, 18 December.

On 18 December in the year as above, by authority of letters of Julian, penitentiary of the lord Pope containing the date at Rome, at St Peter, 6 April 3 Innocent VIII, there was a dispensation, by the reverend father aforesaid of the diocese of St Davidís begotten of a married man and a single woman, that not withstanding such defect he could receive all orders and hold a single benefice as in his letters containing the said dispensation more fully appears.

1491, 4 February.

On 4 February in the year as above, at Llamphey, one Sir Thomas Vaghan, chaplain, was admitted to and instituted in the perpetual vicarage of the parish church of Roch then vacant by the deprivation of Sir David Cole last vicar there, on the presentation of the prior and convent of Pill, patrons of the vicarage.

1491, 23 March.

On the 23rd day of the said month Sir Simon Pecoke, chaplain, was admitted by the reverend etc., to the vicarage of Angle and instituted canonically in the same, then vacant by the resignation of Sir John Baker last vicar there, at the presentation of Sir Robert Smyth rector of the said church, true patron of the said vicarage.

1491, 13 May.

On 13 May etc. lord Hugh etc. admitted Sir Lewis Tailour, chaplain, to the vicarage of the parish church of Carew vacant by the death of Sir Thomas last vicar there; and he was canonically instituted in the same etc. And it was written to the archdeacon of St Davidís or his official touching his induction. He is presented to this vicarage by Master Hugh Raglan rector there, the patron.

1491, 27 October.

On the 27th day of October in the chapel in the manor of Lamphey Sir Griffin Leonyll was admitted by the aforesaid lord to be another of the chaplains of the said chantry of Sir John Wogan knight, founded in the cathedral church of St Davidís on the presentation of Traharn ap Morgan and Joneta Done his wife of the parish of Burton (her sister Joan Done wife of Thomas ap Philip de Picton was co-patroness of the other chaplain). And he was instituted and invested in the same.

1491, 17 December Llamphey.

The same day in the place beforesaid the vicarage of the parish church of Steynton in Ros, vacant by the death of Sir William Powle last incumbant there was delivered in commendam by the reverend father etc. with due regard to what was for its good, to Master John Howell, vicar of Laugharne, for a term of six months, according to the form of the council of Lyons, on the presentation of the prior of Pill.

1492, 5 January Llamphey.

On 5 January in the year and place aforesaid Sir John Tasker, chaplain, was admitted to and instituted according to the form etc. in the parish church of St Mary, Carew, then vacant by the resignation of Sir Lewis Tailour last vicar there and in the gift of Master Hugh Raglan rector there.

1492, 22 August Priory of Carmarthen.

On 22 August in the year and place aforesaid Sir John David, chaplain, was admitted by the aforesaid vicar in spiritualities to the vicarage of the parish church of St Issells vacant by the death of Sir John Lambe last vicar there and instituted therein etc., on the presentation of the precentor and chaplain of St. David's, patrons of the said vicarages.

1492, 1 September Priory of Carmarthen.

On 1 September etc. Sir Persivall, chaplain, was admitted by the oft mentioned vicar in spiritualities to be warden of the free chapel of Coedcanlas then vacant by the resignation of William Boteler last warden there; on the presentation of John Boteler patron of the said chapel.

1493, 23 January.

On the 23rd day of the month the reverend father admitted Master John White chaplain, by Jankyn White his proctor in this behalf, to the parish church of St Florence vacant by the resignation of Master Ralph last incumbant there and instituted and invested him rector of the said church at the presentation of the illustrious prince Jasper duke of Bedford and earl of Pembroke, true patron etc.

1493, 1 May.

On the 1st May the bishop admitted Sir Hugh Lloyd to the parish church of Llys-y-fran and instituted him rector of the same church then vacant by the resignation of Sir Lewis David last rector there, on the presentation of John Devereux lord of Ferrers, John Malefaunt, John Perrot and William Perrot of Scotsborough, patrons of the said Church.

1493, 17 May.

On the 17 May he (the bishop) admitted Sir Thomas Kerver, chaplain, to the parish church of Castle Bigh and instituted him rector of the same then vacant by the death of Sir John Walkyn last rector there, on the presentation of William Perott of Haroldston true patron of the said church. And thereof he had letters in the usual form.

1493, 30 May.

On the 30th May Sir John David chaplain was admitted to the parish church of Treffgarn and instituted rector of the same then vacant by the death of Sir William Page last incumbent there, by the reverend father.

1493, 26 June.

On 26 June in Carmarthen Priory Sir Hugh Lloyd, chaplain, was admitted by Sir Thomas prior there vicar general of the reverend father whilst he himself was engaged in distant parts, to the parish church of Lawrenny and instituted in the same then vacant by the death of Sir David Nant last rector there, on the presentation of John Wogan of Wiston the true patron.

1493, 10 July.

On the 10th of the same month in the place afore-said he instituted Sir Richard Bishoppe to be rector of the parish church of Llys-y-Fran vacant by the resignation of Sir Hugh Lloyd last rector there; on the presentation of John Deveroux, lord le Ferrers, John Malifaunt, William Perot, patrons of the said church.

1493, 14 July.

On 14 July in the same year and place Sir David Vachan, chaplain, was admitted by lord Hugh bishop etc. to the warden ship of the hospital or house of St. John the Baptist within the liberty of Tenby and was canonically instituted as warden or guardian of the said hospital with all its right and pertinances, long time Vacant, on the presentation of the illustrious prince Jasper brother and uncle of kings, duke of Bedford and earl of Pembroke, true patron of the said hospital. And it was written to the archdeacon of St Davidís for his induction.

1493, 20 July.

On 20 July in the year and place aforesaid the bishop collated the perpetual vicarage of Llawhaden to Sir Hugh ap Jankyn, chaplain, and instituted him in the same vacant by the deprivation of Sir John Dyer, last vicar there, and in the bishop's collation in full right.

1493, 20 October.

On 20 October etc. he admitted Master John Barret, chaplain, to the church of St. Mary, Carew, and instituted him rector and invested him in the same then vacant by the death of Master Hugh Raglan last rector there and in the gift of Richard Nywton, esquire, patron of the said church for this turn by reason of the advowson sufficiently granted and delivered to him in this behalf for a single turn by Edmund baron of Carew.

1494, 21 March.

The same day at Lamphey the bishop collated to Sir Maurice ap Griffith chaplain the perpetual vicarage of the parish church of Overham and instituted him vicar of that church vacant by the death of Sir John last incumbant there and in the bishopís collation in full right.

1494, 6 June.

On 6 June in the year aforesaid in Lamphey manor, the bishop admitted Sir Richard Barret, chaplain, to the church of Freystrop and instituted him rector in the same vacant by the resignation of Sir William Warren last incumbant there on the presentation of the prior and convent of Pill patrons of the said church.

1494, 1 July.

On 1 July the bishop collated to Sir Richard Sherewod, chaplain, the vicarage of the parish church of Overham and instituted him as perpetual vicar of the said church then vacant by the resignation of Sir Maurice last vicar there and in the bishopís gift in full right.

1495, 26 February.

On 26 February 1495 in Carmarthen priory Thomas the aforesaid vicar general admitted Master Philip David to the perpetual vicarage of the parish church of St Nicholas, Monktown, and instituted him according to the form etc., in the same then vacant by the death of Sir Philip Mylet last vicar there and in the presentation of the venerable man John Thorton doctor in theology prior of Pembroke priory patron of the said vicarage. And thereof he had etc.

1495, 18 March.

On 18 March in the year aforesaid in Carmarthen priory the aforesaid vicar general admitted Master John Talley to the parish church of St Peter Wilfrey (Lampeter Velfrey) and instituted him rector of the same church vacant by the resignation of master Henry Howel last rector there and in the gift of Rees ap Thomas knight lord of Narberth, patron of the said church.

1495, 25th November.

On the 25th day of the said month the aforementioned lord Hugh bishop of St Davidís in his manse of Bridewell, London collated the perpetual vicarage of the parish church of St Mary, Angle then long time vacant and in his collation for this turn by lapse, to brother William Comyshe capacitated for this by papal authority.

1500. (Prerogative Register of Canterbury.)

In the will of 1500 of Richard Newton, a resident in the parish of Monkton, near Pembroke, he bequeaths "to the chapel of St George the Martyr of Nangle four tenements in Haverfordwest and Pembroke, which lands of late appertained to the chapel of St Anthony in the Nangle, and to the augmentation of the stipend of a priest always to sing for the souls of the founders of the chapel of St Anthony, that is to say...Shelborn and his ancestors and for me and Elinor my late wife" He also directed that "the principal window in the chapel of St George above the altar shall be renewed and barred with green bars, and that the history and life of St George shall be pictured upon the glass".

1502, 22 January.

On 22 January he (Bishop of St Davidís) admitted Master William ap Owen to the perpetual vicarage of Castlemartin vacant by the resignation of Sir John Baker last vicar there and in the presentation of the house or priory of St Nicholas Pembroke etc.

1502, 1 October.

On 1 October in the place aforesaid (Lamphey manor) the bishop admitted Sir Nicholas Percivall to the vicarage of Castlemartin vacant by the resignation of Master William ap Owen last vicar there, to which [he is presented] by the venerable man the prior of St Nicholas, Pembroke and he instituted him etc., saving entirely an annual pension of 40s for the said Master William etc.

1503, 30 May.

On 30 May 1503 the said bishop in the conventual church of Carmarthen Priory, in consideration of charity, collated to Sir David ap Res, chaplain of his diocese the parish church of Eglwys-Cummin vacant by the death of Master John Griffith last incumbent there and in his collation for this turn by lapse of 6 months. And he assigned to the prior of St Nicholas Pembroke a pension of 2s due and of ancient time accustomed to be paid, for the faithful payment of which pension indeed for his time the same Sir David took an oath on the Gospels. And thereof he had the necessary letters of collation etc.

1505, 18 September. (PATENT ROLL 21 Henry VII, pt 1 m4.)

Grant to William Bowen, clerk, of the mastership or wardenship of the hospital of St John the Baptist in Tenby, void by the death of John White clerk.

1505.

Henry VII issued charters of enfranchisement to some lordships.

1507.

Henry VII issued charters of enfranchisement to the principality of North Wales - this meant that Welshmen and Englishmen were equal in law and that Englishmen could be tried by Welsh juries.

1509, 18 May. (LETTERS Henry VIII Vol 1 p10.)

For Griffin Rede: To be steward and receiver of the county and lordship of Pembroke.

1509, 28 June. (LETTERS Henry VIII Vol 1 p31 (Pat. 1 Henry VIII, p2 m28).)

For Richard Lloyd: To be attorney general for the Counties of Carmarthen, Cardigan and Pembroke.

1509, 28 August. (LETTERS Henry VIII Papers, Vol, I, p. 63. Pat. 1, Henry VIll, p. I, m. 17.)

For William Parre, squire of the Body: To be steward, chancellor, and receiver of all lands in co. Pembroke, as lately held by Griffith Rede.

1510, 13 September. (LETTERS, Henry V1II Papers, Vol 1 p. 73.)

For Thomas Philips, squire of the Body: To be crowner and escheator of co Pembroke.

1510, 18 June. (LETTERS, Henry VIII papers, Vol. 1, p. I64. (Pat 2, Henry VIII, p. 2 m.12.)

For William Morgan of Carmarthen: To be constable of the castle of Tynby, Pembroke, during pleasure, so lately held by William Lloid; for his service done to the late king against the rebels of Cornwall upon Blak Heth, where he was sore hurt and maimed'.

1512, 6 July. (LETTERS, Henry VIII Papers, Vol1 p 3 74(Pat. 4, Henry VIII, p. 2, m. 5.)

For Thomas Johnes: To be court clerk, during pleasure, of co. Pembroke, and of the town of Tenbye.

1513.

Henry king of England etc., to Edward etc., bishop of St Davidís greeting. Whereas you and the rest of the prelates and clergy of the province of Canterbury assembled in the last convocation or holy synod of such prelates and clergy in the church of the divine Paul, London, begun and celebrated on 6 February in the year 1511-12 according to the course and computation of the English Church and continued day by day unto and on 17 December then next following granted unto us for the defence and protection of the Anglican Church and this our famous realm of England as well as to allay and extirpate heresies and schisms in the church universal which in these days flourish more than usually, under the manners, forms, conditions, and exceptions written below, not otherwise not in any other manner, four tenths of all ecclesiastical benefices and possessions whatsoever, also of all benefices and possessions of alien priories whatsoever, being in the hands of whatsoever ecclesiastics or secular men of the said province, the specific exceptions within written only excepted, to be levied, collected and paid in the manner, form and terms following, namely one and the first tenth on the feast of St Martin in the winter next to come which will be in the year 1513, the second truly on the feast of St Peter ad Vincula then next to come which will be in the year 1514, and the third on the feast of the Holy apostles Phillip and James which will be in the year 1515, the fourth and last tenth truly on the feast of the said Apostles which will be in the year 1516 saving from the grant, levy, and payment of the said tenth etc., as it more fully appears in the said writ of the king hanging on the file of the year 1513.

Collectors of the first kings tenth to be paid on the feast of St Martin bishop and confessor above:

The prior of Pembroke collector in the archdeaconry of St Davidís,

The abbot of Talley collector in the archdeaconry of Carmarthen,

The prior of Llanthony collector in the archdeaconry of Brecon,

The abbot of the monastery of the Blessed Mary and St Dogmell collector in the archdeaconry of Cardigan,

Collectors of the second tenth:

The prior of the priory of St Thomas the Martyr Haverford collector of the archdeaconry of St Davidís,

The prior of the priory of St John the Evangelist, Carmarthen collector in the archdeaconry of Carmarthen,

The prior of Brecon collector in the archdeaconry of Brecon,

The prior of Cardigan collector in the archdeaconry of Cardigan,

Collectors of the third tenth:

The prior of Pill in the archdeaconry of St Davids,

The abbot of Whitland in the archdeaconry of Carmarthen,

The abbot of Cwmhir in the archdeaconry of Brecon,

The abbot of Strata Florida in the archdeaconry of Cardigan,

Collectors of the fourth tenth:

The prior of Pembroke collector in the archdeaconry of St Davidís,

The abbot of Talley collector in the archdeaconry of Carmarthen,

The prior of Llanthony collector in the archdeaconry of Brecon,

The abbot of the monastery of the Blessed Mary and St Dogmell collector in the archdeaconry of Cardigan,

The goods, church possessions and benefices, in the diocese of St Davidís which have been diminished, impoverished, and other destroyed by wars, fires, ruins, inundations of rivers and other misfortunes and chances deservedly to be excused from payment of the same four tenths according to the force etc., of the grant of the same by the authority of the said convocation follow and are these as appears on the other part of the folio here following etc.

In the archdeaconry of St Davidís are accepted the churches here underwritten:

And first in the Pebidiawke deanery;

The prebends of the chancellor and treasurer in the cathedral church of St Davidís,

The prebend of Brawdy,

The prebends of the archdeacons of St Davidís Carmarthen, Brecon and Cardigan,

The prebend late of William Cardiff,

The prebend late of William de Bornal,

The prebend late of William de Molebogh,

The prebend late of David Gruffyth,

The prebend late of Richard de Veteri Terra,

The prebend late of Peter Leeffe,

The prebend late of Thomas Beke,

The prebend late of William de Mydd,

The prebend late of John de Dalby,

The prebend late of Richard de Brandon,

The prebend late of William de Brywer,

The prebend late of John Lovell,

The prebend late of Thomas de Swaens,

The prebend late of John Browne,

The prebend late of G de Argentyne,

The commons of the canons of St Davidís,

The churches of:

Llanstinan,

St Dogwell,

Patrickís Ford,

Llanrhian,

Trefdiauke,

Llandeloy,

Llanwnda,

Granston,

Manornawan,

Llanrheithan,

Llanhowell,

St Elvis,

Fishguard,

Jordanston,

Letterston,

and the Chamberlainís Town,

and the chapel of Whitchurch,

In the deanery of Roose and Dungleddy the underwritten churches are excepted, as is apparent:

Mainclochog,

Keven,

New Moat,

Llysyfran,

Henryís Mote,

Uzmaston,

Haroldston by Haverford,

Freystrop,

Llangwm,

Camrose,

Johnston,

Hubberston,

Dale,

Herbrandston,

West Robeston,

Villa Theobaldi,

Lambston,

Treffgarn,

Spittal,

Roach,

Haroldston by the Sea,

Hasguard,

and Rubaxton,

In the deanery of Pembroke the underwritten churches are excepted:

Hodgeston,

Gumfreston,

Lamphey,

Warren,

St Twinnells,

Jeffreyston,

St Issells,

Cronwear,

Caldey,

Llisbraust,

Loveston,

Amroth,

Nash,

Stackpole Elidor,

St Petrox,

Penally,

Cosheston,

St Nicholas Pembroke,

St Michael Pembroke,

Manorbier,

Ludchurch,

Robeston,

Stackpole Bosher,

and Narberth,

Also the goods temporal of the abbot of St Dogmells in this archdeaconry are excepted,

Also the goods temporal of the prior of Pill are likewise excepted,

Also the goods temporal of the prior of Haverford are likewise excepted.

(also lists Carmarthen which includes Llampeter Velfrey, Gower Brecon Cardigan etc.)

1514, 16 September. (LETTERS, HenryVII Papers, Vo1 p 883. (Pat. 6, Henry VIII, p. 2, m. 10.))

For Morres ap Parry, yeoman for the King's mouth in his cellar: To be constable of the castle of Tenby, with the custody of the woods called "Coyde Raf", Pembroke.

1516, 21 April. (LETTERS, Henry VIII Papers, Vol 2 pt 1 p 513 (Pat. 7, Henry VIII, p. 1, m. 13.))

For Maurice Aparry, yeoman for the King's mouth: Grant of Radnore Forest, and to be constable of Tenby Castle, Pembroke, with the custody of Coyde Rafe, and 2d. a day; also an annuity of 10 marks, out of the lordship of Staunton Lacy, Salop, which Maurice Ludlowe held by grant of the late Duke of York.

1516, 16 October. (LETTERS, Henry VIII Papers, Vol. 2, pt. 1, p. 766.)

For Sir Th. Philip: To be sheriff, during pleasure, of co. Pembroke, etc.

1517.

Henry etc., to Edward, bishop of St Davidís greetings. Whereas you and the rest of the prelates and clergy of the province of Canterbury assembled in the last convocation or holy provincial synod of such prelates and clergy begun in the cathedral church of the divine Paul, London, on 22 June 1514 and continued day by day down to and on the 23rd day of December in the year of the Lord then next following granted to us under the manners etc., for the preservation and defense of the famous realm and for other considerations moving you, two entire tenths of all benefices and ecclesiastical possessions of the province of Canterbury, taxed and not taxed and usually paying to a tenth, etc, to wit the first moiety of the said first entire tenth of the aforesaid two tenths to be levied, collected and paid at Michaelmas 1517; and the other moiety of the said first entire tenth to be levied etc., at Michaelmas in the following year; and the first moiety of the said second entire tenth to be paid at Michaelmas in the year then next following; saving from the grant, levy, payment of the said two tenths and every moiety or part of the same, exceptions as more fully appears in the said writ pendent in the file of the year of the Lord 1517 etc.

The names of the collectors of the said two tenths follow:

In the archdeaconry of St Davidís;

The prior of Pill collector of the said first entire tenth,

The prior of Pembroke collector of the said second entire tenth,

In the archdeaconry of Carmarthen;

The prior of Carmarthen collector of the said first tenth,

The abbot of Talley collector of the said second entire tenth,

In the archdeaconry of Brecon;

The prior of Brecon collector of the said first tenth,

The abbot of Strata Florida collector of the said second entire tenth,

In the archdeaconry of Cardigan;

The prior of Cardigan collector of the said first tenth,

The abbot of the monastery of St Dogmaels collector of the said second entire tenth,

In the archdeaconry of St Davids the underwritten churches are excepted:

And first in the Pebidiawke deanery

The prebends of the chancellor and treasurer in the cathedral church of St Davidís and of the archdeacons of St Davidís Carmarthen, Brecon and Cardigan

The prebend late of William Cardiff,

The prebend late of William Bornell,

The prebend late of Thomas de Goldbrough,

The prebend late of David Gruffyth,

The prebend late of Richard de Veteri Terra,

The prebend late of Thomas Bekes,

The prebend late of Peter Loff,

The prebend late of William de Midd,

The prebend late of John de Dalderby,

The prebend late of Richard de Braundon,

The prebend late of William de Brywer,

The prebend late of David Lovell,

The prebend late of Thomas de Swaens,

The prebend late of John Brun,

The prebend late of G de Argentim,

The commons of the canons of St Davidís,

The churches of

Llanstinan,

St Dogwell,

Patrickís Ford,

Trefdiauke,

Llandeloy,

Granston,

Manornawan,

Llanrheithan,

Llanhowell,

Llaneylvyw,

Fishguard,

Jordanston,

Letterston,

St Nicholas,

The chapel of Whitchurch,

In the deanery of Roose and Dungleddy the underwritten churches are excepted:

Llawhaden,

Mainclochog,

Steynton,

Roch,

Newmoat,

St Martin, Haverford,

Camrose,

Llanstadwell,

St Ismaelís,

Dale,

Redberth,

Marloes,

Talpenny,

Walwyns Castle,

Nolton,

Llangwm,

Hubberston,

Hasguard,

Villa Theobaldi,

Lambston,

Haroldston by Haverford,

Usmaston,

Spittal,

In the deanery of Pembroke the underwritten churches are excepted:

Angle,

Roscrowther,

Stackpole Elidor,

St Petrox,

Manorbier,

Penally,

Tenby,

Carew,

Cosheston,

Lawrenny,

Roberston,

Gumfreston,

Llisbraust,

Caldy,

St Michaelís Pembroke,

St Nicholas Pembroke,

Nash,

Hodgeston,

Jeffreyston,

Also the goods temporal of the abbot and convent of St Dogmells in the deanery of Kemes in this archdeaconry are excepted by authority of convocation on account of the excessive poverty and ruinous state of the said monastery.

Also the goods temporal of the prior of Haverford are likewise excepted for the same causes.

Also the goods temporal of the priory of the Virgin, Pill, in the same archdeaconry are likewise excepted for the same causes and reasons.

(also lists Carmarthen which includes Llampeter Velfrey, Gower Brecon Cardigan etc)

1518, 19 February. (LETTERS, Henry VIII Papers, Vol. 2, pt. 2, p. 1230.)

For Ric. Lloid: To be Attorney General in the courts of record in cos. Caermarthen, Cardigan, and Pembroke, in South Wales with fees out of the issues of S. Wales, and power to appoint clerks, etc., on surrender of pat. 28 June, l Henry VIII.

1518. 16 October. (LETTERS, Henry VIII Papers, Vol. 2, pt. 2, p.1384 (Pat. 10 Henry VIII, p. 2, m. 1 l.).)

For Maurice Ap Parry, yeoman for the King's mouth in the cellar: To be constable of Tenby castle, and to have the custody of the woods called Coyde Raf, Pembroke, S. Wales, with fees from 16 Sept., 6 Henry VIII, on surrender of patent 16 Sept., 6 Henry VIII.

1524. (LETTERS, Henry VIII Papers, Vol. 4. P. 428.)

Accounts

Fees and wages in the circuit of Thos. Roberts and John Peryent, auditors, granted by Henry VII and Henry VIII.

Pembrokeshire.

Sir Wm. Parre seneschal, £26. 13s. 4d.;

Maurice Butler, customer (40s.) and constable (100s.) of the castle at Tenby, £7

Sir Thos ap Phillips and John Thos. Philip, £5.;

Maurice ap Harry, constable of Tynby castle and keeper of the wood of Coidrath, £41. 11s.;

Jas. Elliot, porter 60s. 8d

Ric. Lloid, King's Attorney, £4;

Roberts and Peryent, £6. 13s. 4d.

= £60. 5s. and granted by the present King.

1526.

Robert Barlow from Slebech sailed along the western sea routes as far as the Azores and accompanied Sebastian Cabot on his second voyage of discovery in April 1526... Translated the famous Spanish treatise "Suma de Geographie" containing the earliest account of the New World into English which together with much material based on his own experiences lay in manuscript form for nearly 400 years until published by the Hakluyt Society in 1931.

1526. (LETTERS and PAPERS Henry VIII, Vol. 4, p. 872.)

No. 1941. Officers in Wales (Paper Roll, B. Mus. R.MS 14 B. xxvii.)

Sir William Parre, seneschal, chancellor and receiver of Pembroke - £26. 13s. 4d.

Maurice Butler, customer of Tenby and Westhaverford and constable of Pembroke castle £9.

John Thomas ap Philip, sheriff of Pembroke - £5

Maurice ap Henry, constable of Tenby castle, and Henry Cadern, clerk of the court of Westhaverford - £42 13s 4d.

John Stephens, porter and constable of Westhaverford - £9 14s.

1526, 30 October. (COURT ROLL, Portfolio 227 No. 44.)

County of Pembroke, held at Pembroke, on Tuesday, 30 October, 1526. before John Wogan Ar., and William Owen, Gent., deputies of Rees Griffith, Ar., lieutenant of William Parre, kt., steward of the county of Pembroke.

Suitors (Sectatores).

Henry, Earl of Northumberland, lord of the manor of Castle Walwain in Rous, who holds the said manor of our lord the King, as of his county of Pembroke, by Henry Catharne, his bailiff there, asked to be fined for the remission of his suit of court this year, 13s. 6d, as was used to be done in previous years.

John Touchett, kt, Lord of Audeley and Kemeys, who holds the manor of Kemeys as above for the pardon of several defaults this year.

Henry Weriott, Ar., one of the feoffees of the said manor, fine for suit of court this year, 13s 4d.

Walter Deveraux Kt. Lord Ferrers and Charteley, lord of one-fifth part of the manor of Hoggeston, who holds the said part of our lord the king as of his county aforesaid by Cadwallader ap Howell his bailiff, came and asked to be fined for the remission of his suit of court this year, and was allowed, fine, 2s.

John Longvile Kt. lord of another part of the manor of Hoggeston, divided into five portions, by Richard Wogan, the steward, came, etc. as above, fine 2s

Thomas Perrott Ar., lord of one-third part of the manor Hoggeston, petitioned for several defaults this year 12d.

John Perrott son and heir of William Perrott, late of Scottisburgh, as yet a minor; his lands, namely, one-fourth part of the manor of Hoggeston and of other lands, which are held by the king, are still in the hands of the king by reason of his nonage. Therefore his fine for suit of court, etc., is respited here.

John Wogan of Weston, lord of three parts of Weston and Dougledy, appeared in person, therefore nothing taken here as fine.

Dame Joan Don, widow, lord of one-fourth part of Weston and Dougledy, for pardon of fine of suit of court this year, as appears above, fine 6d.

Mathias Cradok, kt., lord of Torre, for the pardon of several defaults this year, as appears above, 12d.

Maurice Butler, Ar., lord of Somerhill in Coidrath, in right of Elizabeth his wife, fine for the remission of suit of court this year, 6d.

Rees Griffith, Ar., Baron of Cairewe, nil.

George Vernon, lord of the manor of Stakepole, infra. His land is in the hand of the king, therefore no fine.

Hugh Mervyn, in the right of Julian his wife, lord of Ludchurche, fine for pardon of suit of court this year, 6d.

Hugh Manwcell, in the right of Joan his wife, lord of Jordaneston, for the pardon of several defaults this year, fine 6d.

Rees ap Owen lord of Upper and Lower Asshe. His land in the hands of the king. Therefore no fine.

Owen Laugharne, lord of half the manor of Mynerdon, in the hands of the king, therefore no fine.

John Butler, lord of another half of the manor of Mynerdon, for the pardon of several defaults this year and 6d.

Henry Newton, lord of St. Issely, a minor; not known who received the profits of this manor. Therefore, etc.

Margaret, widow of James White, lord of Somerhill, for pardon of several defaults this year, 6d.

Thomas Gruffith , lord of Nautege came in his own person from county to county. Therefore no fine.

David ap Grí Llewelin Duy, lord of Treflissny, appeared in his own person. Therefore no fine.

Alice, the Wife of Rees ap Hoel ap Rees, lord of -. for the pardon of several defaults. Therefore, etc., 6d

Sum of Fines of Suitors with Defaults, 36s. 1d.

1526 31 October. (Court of the Gate of the Castle of Pembroke, held at Pembroke, on Wednesday, 31 October, 1526.)

Henry Wirioth Ar., lord of a moiety of the manor of Costyngeston came in person to do suit.

David Barrett, gent., and Jenet Don, widow, lords of the other moiety of the said manor, pardons for several defaults this year 12d.

1526, 8 November. (ST. FFLORENCE. - Hundred Court held there Thursday 8 November, 1526, before William Owen, deputy.)

William Waichan, Richard Whith, Thomas Bisshopp, Robert More, suitors of the said hundred came and asked to be fined for the remission of their suits of court this year, and they were allowed, each of them to pay 2d. (2 suits.) Total, including fines for suit of court, 2s. 2d.

1527, 25th January. (CASTLE MARTIN. - Hundred Court, held on Thursday 25th January 1527).

Thomas Perrott, Ar., Maurice Butler, Ar., Thomas Gruffyn, Ar., Henry (Capel) Thomas Thomas (Mercer); John Mody, John Whitecok, David Harry, Robert Poyer Turnor, Richard Roper, William ap Owen, clerk, suitors of the said hundred, came in their own persons and asked to be fined for the remission of their suits of court this year, and they were allowed each of them to pay 4d. (2 suits.) Total, including the said fines, 4s.

Coidrath. (Court held there on Tuesday next after Michaelmas, 18 Henry VIII before William ap David Williams the steward there.)

Thomas, the abbot of Whitland, William Barrett, of Pendyne, James Williams, William Vachan, suitors of the said court, came in their own persons and asked to be fined for the remission of their suits of court this year, and they were allowed each of them to pay 4d.

Total, 16d.

1527.

Rhys ap Thomas died at Carew [when his descendant Lord Dynevor repaired the tomb in 1865 there was found in it the skeletons of Rhys and his second wife Janet widow of Thomas Stradling. One of his natural daughters Margaret married Henry Wirriott of Orielton, High Sheriff in 1548; their son George had a son who died young and an only daughter who married Sir Hugh Owen of Bodowen, Anglesey.]

1528.

Sir Rhys ap Griffiths of Carew Castle complained to Cardinal Wolsey that 20,000 Irish "raskells" had landed in Pembrokeshire.

Pembrokeshire Antiquities p36.

1528.

The Pope; "in as much as we learn the discipline is greatly relaxed in the monastery of the nuns of the meadow.... it must be wholly suppressed and the properties, farms and all rights must be returned to the Monastery of St Albans".

1531.

Sir Rhys ap Gruffydd executed for treason. His estates confiscated by the Crown and said to be worth £10,000 a year. Much of this estate was acquired by Walter Devereux (Lord Ferrers) Chief Justice for South Wales. He founded the fortunes of what became a great aristocratic family with a Welsh seat at Llamphey, at what had been the episcopal estate there. His grandson was the first of the Devereux Earls of Essex and another branch became Lord Herefords.

1528, 15 March. (LETTERS, Henry VIII, vol. IV, p. 1824.)

Peter Mutton, yeoman usher of the chamber: To be constable of Pembroke Castle, South Wales, with 100s a year as Maurice Butteler was constable.

1528.

Del. Hampton Court, 1[5] March, 19 Hen. VIII. S.B.

Griffin Rede, usher of the chamber: To be customer and butler and "silaginer" (sealer) in the ports of Pembroke and Tynby.

1528, 20 April. (LETTERS, Henry VIII Papers, vol IV, pp. I864-5.)

David Morgan, sewer of the chamber. To be bailiff of the lordship of Stakpole, Pembroke, in the kingís, gift by reason of the minority of Tho. Vernon, son and heir of Rich. Vernon.

1529, 4 April. (PATENT ROLL, 25 Henry VIII p1, m. 46.)

Lease for seven years from the feast of the Apostles Philip and James next following the date of these presents, to William ap David Williams of all the coal mines whatsoever lying within our view of Cordrathe, co. Pembroke, which are now in decay, and which used to be arrented at 53s. 4d yearly, with leave to dig, erect, and reconstruct the said mines at his pleasure, paying a yearly rent of 46s 8d to the king's exchequer at Pembroke.

1530, 28 January. (LETTERS, Henry VIII Papers, vol IV, p. 2772.)

William Parr and John Docwray, appointed seneschals and receivers of all lands in Pembroke, on surrender of patent 28 Aug 1 Henry VIII granting the office to Wm. Parre alone.

1530, 6 May. (LETTERS, Henrys VIII Papers, vol. I V, p2881(Pat 22 Henry VIII, pt. 1, m. 2.))

Wm. Harrys: Lease of the farm of Westgupton, and all houses, elc., thereto belonging, and 30 acres of land in Eastgupton, now in pasture near Le Heyn, and a pasture called Donslake at Estgupton, and three acres of reeds called Le Heyn in the lordship of Castlemartyn, Pembroke, Wales, parcel of the lands late of the duke of Bedford; with reservations; for 21 years, at certain annual rents and 6s 4d of increase.

1531. (LETTERS AND PAPERS . Henry VIII, vol. V, No. 683, p. 601.)

Draft of instructions by the king to commissioners to be appointed to go into the county of Pembroke and other places in Wales, to take possession and survey the lands, etc., late of Rice ap Griffith. Among other things they were to make search for charters relating to the lands and to inquire in whose custody the seal of the Chancery of Pembroke is, and put the records in safe keeping.

1531.

Henry VIII granted the governorship of Carew Castle to his natural son Sir John Perrott of Haroldson and Jestynton by Mary Berkley wife of Sir Thomas Perrot of Haroldson. He owned many manors on the south side of the Haven among which where Pennar, East and West Popton and "Halle Place in Nangle" he died in the Tower in 1592 and had been Governer Deputy for Ireland in 1583- 8.

1532. (MISC. BOOK NO. 151, ff. 31-3.)

Seisin of the lands, etc., of Rice ap Gnffith, attained in the county of Pembroke.

The dates and places at which seisin and possession were taken to the use of the king by Maurice ap Henry, John Smith and William Brabazan, the royal commissioners appointed for this purpose.

County of Pembroke.

Town of Pembroke , in a tenement in High Street, 21 January, 23 Henry VIII (1532), possession was taken of all castles, lordships, lands, rents, and of any other possession whatsoever in the aforesaid county, lately belonging to Rees ap Griffith, in the presence of many there.

Old Carewe, in the castle there 21 January, 1532, Possession taken of all lands, etc.

Haverfordwest, in the tenement where Owen Whythe now lives, 24 January, 1532, etc.

Tenby, in the tenement occupied by David Tanner, 29 January, 1532, etc.

Narberth, in the castle there, 19 January, 1532.

1532.

Henry VIII created Anne Boleyn Marshioness of Pembroke. 1532-1536 Anne Boleyn held Pembroke Castle.

1534.

Lawlessness had continued in Wales. Juries failed to convict the local powerful magnates either out of fear or because they were bribed. Many of the more major criminals were friendly or related to the local magnates: witness Sir John Perrott, the town authorities and the pirates living in Quay St. Haverfordwest. Murder went unpunished except by the Council of Wales. The magnates would force the local population to pay the magnates fines.

Henry authorised Rowland Lee, Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield (although a clergyman, he had never preached) to stop the crime in the Marches of Wales. He was a man who had little love for the Welsh and was appointed President of the Council for Wales with power to order executions and he is reputed to have had 5,000 people hanged in his six years as President.

Henry VIII backed him with a series of laws:

1] Juries suspected of giving false verdicts were to be severely punished by the Council.

2] No night time crossing of the River Severn was permitted (this was to stop cattle raiding).

3] No one was to carry arms and "arthel" (befriending criminals) and "commorthas" (gatherings at which collections were made to pay the fines of local magnates) were forbidden.

4] All offenders escaping from a lordship had to be returned.

5] Marcher lords' officials were to be tried by the Council if they wrongfully imprisoned or fined people.

6] Crimes committed in the Marches could be tried in the nearest English county.

1534.

William Waren or Warren was the last prior of Pembroke

(MS. Col. Vol. xxvii fol 122b).

Ecelesia Santi Nicholai de Monckton, Santi Michaelis Pembr. et abarum; videlicet.

Willmuss Waren prior cellae sive prioratus de Moncketon st Pembs. et ratione ejusdem rector eccliarum poch subscriptarum, videlt, Sancti Nichoi. de Monckton, Sancti Michaels Pembr. divae Mariae Pembr., capellae de Crukemanan et eclliae parrachialis de Castro Martini, cum maneiis terris et tentis ac glebus dictus eccliis spectantibus infra Decanat. Pembr. asseriut se inde computatur coram comiss dni regis com. Hertfeo quod cella praedca sub monasterio Snacti Albani existit. (Return 26 Henry VIII First Fruits Office).

1535. (ACT OF UNION, S. 17.)

And that the Lordships, Towns, Parishes, Commotes, Hundreds and Cantreds of Haverfordwest, Kilgarran, Lansteffan, Laugherne otherwise called Tallaugherne, Walwyns Castle, Dewysland, Lanwehaden, Lanfey, Nerberth, Slebeche, Rosmarket, Castellan and Landofleure, in the said country of Wales, and every of them shall be united annexed and joined to and with the County of Pembroke.


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