Jottings

Pembrokeshire

1536-1800

No order

B. H. J. Hughes.



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1534 William Waren  or Warren  was the last prior of Pembroke. (MS. Col Vol. xxvii fol. 122b).

Ecelesia Santi Nicholai de Monckton,  Santi Michaelis Pembr . et abarum; videlicet.

Willmuss Waren  prior cellae sive prioratus de Moncketon  st Pembs. et ratione ejusdem rector eccliarum poch subscriptarum, videlt, Sancti Nichoi . de Monckton ,  Sancti Michaels Pembr . divae Mariae Pembr ., capellae de Crukemanan  et eclliae parrachialis de Castro Martini , cum maneiis terris et tentis ac glebus dictus eccliis spectantibus infra Decanat. Pembr. asseriut se inde computatur coram comiss dni regis com.  Hertf eo quod cella praedca sub monasterio Sancti Albani  existit. (Return 26 Henry VIII First Fruits Office).

The clear value of this priory in the 26th Henry VIII appears to have amounted to £57   9s 3 3/4d. Speede makes the gross revenue to have gone up to £113 2s 6 1/4d.

Tanner says the Benet college manuscript makes the value £32 3s 4d per annum only.

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1546 The site of Pembroke Priory was granted in the 37th Henry VIII to John Vaughan and Katherine his wife.

Particulars for grants temp Henry VIII Augmentation Office.

Md that I John Vaughan doctor of lawe do requyre to purchase of the kings majestie by virtue of his grace's commission of sale the manor and selle of Penbroke,  otherwise called Monkton in South Walles in the countie of Penbroke, with their rights, members and appurtenance being of the clere yearly value of twelve pounds the tenth not being deducted.  In wytnes wherof to this subscrybed with my hande I have sett my seale the nynth day of December in the 37th year of the reign of our most dreade soveraign Lord Kynge Henry the eight by the Grace of God Kynge of Inglonde, France and Ireland, defender of the faith and of the Church of Inglonde and also of Ireland on earth the supreme hedd.

                                                                                                      Jo Vaughan.

[the price was £216].

(In other manuscripts described as Sir John Vaughan of Whitland).

(Dugdales Monasticum p 322 onwards [1823 version in 6 Vol. Edit. by Caley, Ellis and Bandinel.])

1548 During the time of Bishop Ferrar’s attempt to re-organise the Diocese of St David’s he was opposed in this by Thomas Young the precentor and Rowland Meyrick (father of the 2nd Earl of Essex’s household steward). Their allies were the Devereux and the Barlows, whom Ferrar had estranged in turn, the Barlows by challenging their claims to the farm of the prebend of Brawdy and the lease of Monkton and accusing them of witholding tithes that ought to have come to the Bishop from Carew and the Devereux by seeking to recover Lamphey. The Bishop was by his chapter accused of numerous charges of abuse of authority, maintenance of superstition, covertousness etc. and remained in custody till his martyrdom in Mary’s reign. Meyrick proceeded to the office of a commissioner and Bishop of Bangor.

(Journal of the Historical Society of the Church of Wales vol page 62.)

1559 July 18th list of visitors (Western circuit -Wales + Hereford & Worcester) to administer the oath to clergy under the Act of Supremacy to enforce the use of the Prayer Book and to promulgate the royal injunctions.

Richard Davies (1501?  - 81) later Bishop of St Asaph (1560-61) and St David's (1561-81),  translater of the New Testament.

Rycharde Pates?

Thomas Yonge (1507-68) Born at Hodgeston educated at Broadgates Hall Oxford - principal there 1542-6 - precentor St David's in 1542. In 1559 with Meyrick and Constantyne involved in a violent quarrel with Bishop Ferrar - Bishop of St Davids January 1560, translated to York 1561.

D. Rowland  Meyrick (1505 -66) born at Bodorgan Anglesey chancellor of St Davids - Bishop of Bangor  December 1559.

George Constantine of Llawhaden. Register of St David's ­during  Bishop Barlow's time; was imprisoned in the Tower on charges of treason and heresy. Archdeacon of Brecon 1559 died 1561.

1536 Union‑with‑England.

Union was brought about in three stages:

1536

An Act which said that eight JPs were to be appointed in each Welsh shire . The English legal requirement of £20 a year income did not apply. Shires were to be divided into Hundreds fitting the old commotal areas of administration.

An Act was for " laws and Justice to be Ministered in Wales in like form as it it is in this Realm".

This was designed to make Wales part of England . It abolished the rights and privileges of the Marcher lords and ordered that English law be applied. Welsh men could then stand for Parliament, but were only allowed to hold office in Wales if they could speak English. Two Commissions of Inquiry were appointed  - one to fix boundaries and one to consider wether to keep any of the laws of Hywel Dda.

1536 Dissolution of the Monasteries.

1538 William Barlow Bishop of St David's unroofed the Palace of St David's and the castle of Llawhadden . Was it for the marriage portions of his five daughters who all married Bishops. His wife was Agatha Wellsburn a runaway Abbess of Norfolk . This is very suspect were his daughters born at the time?

(The reformation in Pembrokeshire down to 1553 by Prof. Glanmor Williams p.8)

... In the rural deanery of Pembroke there were 41 parishes all told. Within this deanery were some of

the best benefices in the county Carew (43 pounds) Tenby (26) and Narberth (25). In all there were 12 parishes worth more 10 pounds a year. Of these only two had a resident parson in 1534, and they were two of the least valuable - Begelly (12) and Bosheston (11).

1538   Official attacks on shrines and places of pilgrimage.

1549   Quarrels between Bishop Ferrar of St David's and Thomas Young the precentor made it virtually impossible for Young to get a curate to serve his churches at Spittal, Nash or Hodgeston.

1540 Henry VIII rented Lamphey Palace from Bishop Barlow of St David's and gave it to Richard Devereux eldest son of Earl Ferrers afterwards Earl of Essex.

(Crime and Punishment   -  Roger Whiting).

1541Four Justices of Assize for four circuits were appointed.

1542-3

An Act giving the Council of Wales and the Marches wide powers over Wales and the Bordering English Counties of Herefordshire, Gloucestershire, Worcestershire, Shropshire and Chester . It had powers to hear all criminal cases brought to it by poor people who could't afford to go to common lawcourts, it tried serious offences and heard appeals from lower courts which it was responsible for supervising. It was abolished in 1641. Court of Great Sessions was established to take place twice a year for six days at a time in every shire, presided by the assize judges.

Quarter Sessions were to be held by the new Justices of the Peace. County Courts were to be held by the sheriffs monthly and also Hundred Courts for minor matters every fifteen days.

Sheriffs position was downgraded they were in future only allowed to hold office for one year and were under the control of the JP's. They also were put in charge of county goals. Bailiffs were reduced to supervising executions, pillories and whippings. Constables of the peace were appointed in each hundred under the control of the JP's. This new system of courts lasted until 1830.  

The JP had to swear oaths of supremacy and allegiance, recognizing the Monarch as head of the country and of the Church, they were also required to supervise inns, regulate alehouses, maintain bridges,

apply regulations on weights, and deal with vagrants and under Queen Mary to supervise the maintainance of roads. During Elizabeth 's I reign the administration of poor relief, the regulation of manual workers wages and the establishment and management of houses of correction which provided compulsory work for the unemployed.

Under an Act passed in 1530 1 to deal with an "alarming" increase in robberies and theft. “Any person, being whole and mighty in body and able to labour, found begging or being vagrant and giving no satisfactory account of how he or she lawfully obtained his or her living” could be arrested by a constable. A JP. could have him or her stripped naked, tied to a cart and whipped "till his or her body should be bloody". The vagrants then had to swear to return to their  birth place or were they had lived for the last three years and there "labour as a true man ought to do".

1545/63

Estimated No. of Households in Pembroke hundred    4,225

Estimated Population of Pembrokeshire           20,079

("The Population of Wales in the 16 and 17th centuries"   Leonard Owen.)

1546.

The site of Pembroke Priory was granted in the 37th year of Henry VIII to John Vaughan

and Katherine his wife.

Particulars for grants temp Henry VIII Augmentation Office.

Md that I John Vaughan doctor of lawe do requyre to purchase of the kings majestie by virtue of his grace's commission of sale the manor and selle of Penbroke, otherwise called Monkton in South Walles in the countie of Penbroke, with their rights, members and appurtenance being of the clere yearly value of twelve pounds the tenth not being deducted.  In wytnes wherof to this subscrybed with my hande I have sett my seale the nynth day of December in the 37th year of the reign of our most dreade

soveraign Lord Kynge Henry the eighth by the Grace of God Kynge of Inglonde ,  France and Ireland ,  defender of the faith and of the Church of Inglonde and also of Ireland on earth the supreme hedd.

                                Jo Vaughan.

[the price was £216]

1548.

Barlow became Bishop of Bath and Wells.

1554.

Before this date JP's could only arrest people on definite charges.

After, they could arrest people on suspicion and interrogate them for three days; then if need be commit them for trial. At these felony examinations the person who arrested the accused as well as those who had accused him had to appear. If the JP felt the accused had a case to answer, he noted "the examination of the said prisoner and information of them that bring him of  the fact and the circumstances thereof for certification to the next gaol delivery". He then bound the accusers to give evidence at the trial and committed the accused to prison. If two JP's were present the prisoner could be granted bail.

Offenders committing Misdemeanours (drunkenness and brawling for example) could be dealt with "summarily" (without a full trial) by a single JP, often in the JP's own house.

1555 Responsibility for the upkeep of the roads fell on the parishes. Each parishioner was supposed to give four days labour (later increased to 6) towards the maintenance of the roads. The Act was not rigidly enforced. This state of affairs existed until the setting up of the Turnpike Trusts by Acts of Parliament which were really private companies that built improved and maintained roads and could charge travellers tolls for using them.

[Journal of the Historical society of the Church of Wales vol page 62]

1559 July 18th list of visitors (Western circuit Wales + Hereford & Worcester ) to administer the oath to clergy under the Act of Supremacy to enforce the use of the Prayer Book and to promulgate the royal injunctions.

Richard Davies (1501?  81) later Bishop of St Asaph (1560-61) and St David's 1561-81, translater of the New Testament.

Rycharde Pates? ?

Thomas Yonge 1507-68.  Born at Hodgeston educated at Broadgates Hall Oxford, Principal there 1542-6 precentor St David's in 1542. In 1559 with Meyrick and Constantyne involved in a violent

quarrel with Bishop Ferrar, Bishop of St Davids January 1560 translated to York 1561.

D. Rowland  Meyrick 1505- 66 born at Bodorgan Anglesey chancellor of St Davids, Bishop of Bangor  December 1559.

George Constantine of Llawhaden Register of St David's during Bishop Barlow's time was imprisoned in the Tower on charges of treason and heresy archdeacon of Brecon 1559 died 1561]

1566. (Seafaring along the Pembrokeshire coast in the days of the sailing ships   E. G. Bowen.)

A document drawn up in 1566 gives the names of all ports creeks and landing places in Pembrokeshire based on the certificates returned to the Piracy Commissions appointed in 1565 and 1577 for the suppression of piracy. The list is given as Tenby, Caldy, Stackpole, Newgale, Rhoscrowther, Popton, Pwllcrochan, Pembroke, Creswell, Carew, Lawrenny, Landshipping, Dale, Sandyhaven, Gellyswick, Hubbaston, Great Pill, Little Pill, Newtown , Neyland, Burton , Llangwm, St  Brides Bay, Nolton, Solva, Porthclais, Porth Mawr, Trefin, Fishguard, Newport and St Dogmaels.

1566 Reference is made to "certain oranges with the mariners"- 20years later "30,000 orendges and lemons" from France .

1572 Act for the Punishment of Vagabonds and for the relief of the poor and impotent (helpless) started:

"Where all parts....of England and Wales be presentlyy with rogues, vagabonds and sturdy beggars exceedingly pestered, by means whereof daily happeneth.... horibble murders, thefts and other great outrages.... be it enacted [that any over 14 years old] be brought before one of the justices of the peace.... and be presently committed to the common gaol.... there to remain.... until the next sessions of the peace or general gaol delivery"

Anyone then found guilty was whipped and burned through the "grisle" of the right ear with an inch thick "hot iron".

JP's had to compile a register of the "poor, aged and impotent" and then tax the community to raise money to care for them. They were to appoint overseers of the poor to specialise in poor relief.

1576 Act instructed JP's to buy work materials and provide “houses of correction” in which vagabonds were to be "strictly kept as well in diet as in work, and also punished from time to time".

1576 Richard Devereux Earl of Essex and holder of Lamphey Palace from the King died in Ireland . His son Robert age nine succeeded and his widow Countess Lettice then married the Earl of Leicester and his daughter Dorothy (some say Penelope) married Sir Thomas Perrott son of Sir John.

George Devereux brother of Richard then lived at Lamphey and the nephew Robert Earl of Essex lived there with him until he was twenty two.

Robert Earl of Essex became a favourite of Elizabeth I and she bestowed Carew Castle on him but later fell in disgrace and was beheaded in 1601 on Tower Hill.

With Robert Earl of Essex lived and fought and died Sir Gilly Meyrick of Gellyswick, Milford Haven son of Dr Rowland Meyrick, Bishop of Bangor, and Katherine daughter of Owen Barrett of Gellywick.

1588

The advent of the Spanish Armada caused uneasiness in government circles leading to an examination of the Haven's defences.

George Owen Deputy Lieutenant of Pembrokeshire surveyed the area and recommended forts to be built on Thorn Island , Dale Point and the Stack Rock.

1598 Katherine daughter of Owen Barrett of Gellyswick who had married Dr. Rowland Meyrick, Bishop of Bangor left four sons and two daughters - eldest was Sir Gilly Meyrick, Knt who was a lifelong friend of the Earl of Essex - he shared the same fate and died on the scaffold in 1601 - the Meyrick's of Fleet near Monkton were descended from him. [In 1828 Thomas Meyrick of Bush married Jane great granddaughter of Brown Willis the antiquary - they had an only daughter Jane Sophia who married St John Chinerton Charlton esq., of Apley Castle Salop. Their second son Thomas inherited Bush and took the name Meyrick; on his older brothers death he inherited Apley also - he was created Baronet in 1880].

1595 November 8. Carmarthen

Frances Meyrick was one of the signatories of a letter addressed to Sir John Puckering, Lord Keeper, Lord Burghley, Lord Treasurer, The Earl of Essex, Lord Buckhurst and the Earl of Pembroke. Requesting ships of war and fortifications to defend the harbour of Milford .

(Bronwydd MS 3, fos.96-7.)

1600 October 1

Francis Meyrick was one of the signatories of a letter to the Mayor and Aldermen of the Town and County of Haverfordwest billeting 200 soldiers stranded by bad weather in the Haven, on their way to Ireland , in the town and County of Haverfordwest until the wind changes.

1615

Johannes Meyrick genr. pro pauperbus was mentioned as one of the treasurers of the poor and mained soldiers within the county of Pembroke [the funds appear to have been misdirected [£200 to a house of correction which was never made, £40 per year towards the relief of mained soldiers but only two paid in the county and they received £11 between them per annum, £12 yearly levy for the relief of poor persons - only £6 distributed. Money raised to repair St Katherins Bridge and other bridges and the money converted to their own use.]

(Bronwydd MS 399.)

[below- George Garret was agent to Leister, 6th Viscount Hereford (1617-76)]

1660 October 1 Boughwood [Bowett farm near Hundleton]

Francis Meyrick to Mr George Garrett,

To defraud or contest with my lord, far be that thought from me. It pleased you being my lord's agent, at your last being in the country to suffer me to continue tenent to those lands and tenements which I held that time of his lordship, not cutting down any timber or selling any furze from off the land, paying the rent and tithe of my corn as formally I did. I confess I ploughed up two acres in the wood wherein there has not been sown these fourty years and upward any corn, and I had part of the East Close in the parish of St Maries in corn also, for which I payed no tithe, nor did I formerly in regard it was part of the priory demesnes, and in my weak judgement if I had paid tithe wool, lambs, cheese and hay to the minister of the two parishes, which has nor been paid in any mans memory, and so consequently have predudiced my lord or his tenent who shall hereafter hold it, but rather than I will incure his lordship's displeasure I shall be willing to give his lordship any reasonable satisfaction.

                Sir, you know I pay a great rent for Broughwood, which is as much as any man will give unless it be one that will hold the plough himself. I have been at a great charge on it. It is a bare open space, neither succour for young cattle or sheep without the wood, and I have no encouragement either to manure, hedge or build on it, having no term, so that if you please to use the means whereby a lease of three lives or one and twenty years on it with the wood may be procured from his lordship, I shall not be unmindful nor ungrateful to you for your love and favour therein.

Endorsed in another hand: 1 October 1660 Monncton. Captain Meyricke's letter.

(Glansevern MS. 7710.)

Extracts from a letter from William Holcombe to Mr Georg Garett at Ipswich

1660/1 February 21 Brownslate

Sir, as for Mounton farm ............But if you please my father and myself will give as much as any man alive can........always provided that we may have the wood with it that Captain Meyricke holds.......Mr Esix Meyricke does boast very freely that he will have the land again and do give out that the business is in suit with my honourable lord, and do pretend to bring it to be the King's land and do threaten that he will do strange matters to me and my father, so that I should be glad to hear from you.

(Glansevern MS. 7708.)

[William Holcombe was acting as local agent for George Garrett]

1661 April 8. Boughwood.

Francis Meyrick to Mr George Garratt,

I am sorry I could not have my rent ready to send you by Mr Holcomb and withal that I must discover to you the unkindness of my nephew who is to pay me £20 on May day next, which Mr Holcomb can signify unto you, yet although I aquainted him with my case at present he would not pay me until his day of payment came, which doth not a little trouble me. I hope my lord will not be so extreme as to take advantage of the forfeiture of my bond. God willing, his lordship's rent shall be paid to Mr Holcomb upon his return.

I hope my lord will be pleased I shall continue his tenent for what I do hold from him. Without the wood You know Boughwood to be a very barren, open place having no succour on it for cattle, and if you set it from me it is an impossible thing for me to avoid trespassing on it in regard it is so adjacent. I rest on you wholly to be my friend therin. The repairing of the old hedge will cost at least £6, and when it is repaired there are so many trespasses on it, and so poor that are not able to give satisfaction to him that questions them, so that there must be a charge laid out every year to keep it in repair. Sir, it is my desire that my lord would grant me a lease of three lives to my use, that is my wife's life, her son's life and her daughter's life.

(Glansevern MS. 7711).

1796 March 29 Pembroke.

Extract from a letter from J[oseph] Adams to John Cambell, esq. .... I suppose you have heard of Miss Meyrick's death at Bath . She died without a will; consequently Mr Meyrick comes in for all her fortune - about £5000. He is now at Bath . Mrs Meyrick goes there in a day or two, thence to London ........

(NLW. MS. 1352 B.ff. 333-9).

Tanner refers to a manuscript which was formerly preserved in the Cottanian library at Westminster marked Otho B IV intitled "Processus  inductionis Manerii sive Prioratus de Penbroke metrice" which disappeared after the fire of 1731.

He also refers to the following records concerning this priory Pat 18 Edw II p1 m14 pro ecc.  de Nangell

Pat 14 Edw III p3 m 26 pro eccl.  de Maynesby

Pat 19 Hen VI p 3 m 7 de concessione hujus Prioratus Humfrido duci Glocestriae Cart 27 &c Hen.VI name de concessione hujus prioratus abbaliae S. Albani.

Pat 1 Edw IV p 4 m 10 pro confirm concessionis abbaliae S. Albani.

1652 October 7th

Letter

Erasmus Phillips, Sampson Lort and William Phillips, Pembroke Town to the Committee for regulation of Markets, the Inner Exchequer Chamber, Westminster :

Having received their order of 15th June 1652 concerning the regulating of markets, enclosed in a letter from Mr Blackgrave, the writers caused it to be published at the public sessions holden for co. Pembrocke at the town hall of Pembrocke on 5 October. They made known such [fit] places within the county where markets may be directed, viz. , Mounton in the hundred of Castlemartyn on Tuesday, Fishguard in Kemes on Wednesday, Lawhadden in Dungleddy on Thursday, St Florence in Castemartyn on Thursday, and Narberth in the hundred of Narberth on Wednesday. The reason of their certificate herein is that there is no market in the county but in the corporate towns of Pembroke and Tenby and the county town of Haverfordwest.

(Calender of the Records of the borough of Haverfordwest 1539 - 1660).

................................................................................................................................

(According to The Monastic Order in South Wales   1066-1348  F. G. Cowley.)

Pembroke Priory  had three appropriated Churches:

Castlemartin value £26  13  4d

Monkton value £26  13  4d

Pembroke St Michael's value £10  0  0d

Assessed value for temporalities £19   6   3 1/2d  - no figure given for spiritualities.

1592 July 14. Haverfordwest.

GEORGE OWEN, ALBANE STEPNETH and JOHN AP REES TO ROBERT VAGHAN, JOHN GARNONS and OWEN PHILIPPs of PENBEDO,GENTLE Men, Thomas ap Richard, Clerk, Parson of Penbedo, Jevan David, CLERK, Parson of Bridell, and George Owen, Clerk, Parson of Whitchurche.

Whereas we have received letters from the lords and others of Her Majesty's most Honourable Privy Council to us and other directly whereby we are willed and required to inform ourselves of all places within this county of Pembrooke where in times past there have been pilgrimages images or offerings whereunto (as their lordships are informed) divers sorts of people do use to repair as well in the night season as other times of the day, and that in great numbers, and that we should cause those idolatrus and superstitious monuments to be pulled down, broken and quite defaced, so as there be no monument, token or memory remaining of the same, and likewise to take order that thereafter there be no such unlawful resort to these superstitious places, but to appoint some discreet and well affected persons to have an eye and regard to those that, notwithstanding this inhibition, shall repair to those places and to see them apprehended and brought before us to be severally punished for their disobedience and lewd behaviour.

These are therefore by virtue and authority of the said honourable letters and commission to will and require you, being gentIemen to us known to be well affected and forward in Her Majesty's service and good of the country, forthwith with all convenient speed to repair to the place called St Meygans,*

where sometimes offerings and supplicatious pilgrimages have been used, and there to cause to be pulled down and utterly defaced all relics and monuments of that chapel, not leaving one stone thereof upon another, and from time to time to cause to be apprehended all such person and persons of what sex, kind or sort whatsoever that shall presume hereafter, contrary to the tenor and purport of this said honourable. commission, to repair either by night or day to the said chapel or well in supplicatious manner and them to bring or send before us or any one of us to be used and dealt withal according to their deserts.

Hereof praying you to have special regard for the due accomplishment of the premises, as you tender the service of God and Her Majesty and the benefit and quiet of the country, we take our leave commending you to God's tuition. (Endorsed: A letter from divers justices of peace to suppress the superstition at St.Migan's Well.

(Bronwydd MS. 3 f.85.)

*Pistyll Meugan in the parish of Llanfair NanT Gynn.

1595 November 8. Carmarthen

Frannces Meyrick was one of the signatories of a letter addressed to Sir John Puckering, Lord Keeper, Lord Burghley, Lord Treasurer, The earl of Essex, Lord Buckhurst and the Earl of Pembroke requesting ships of war and fortifications to defend the harbour of Milford .

(Bronwydd MS. 3, fos. 96-7.)

1595 The export of cloth from the area had virtually ceased and George Owen laments "The trade of clothinge used in tymes past in this countrie ys now utterly neglected, whereby thousands were mayntayned". Owen estimated that twice as much wool was shorn in Pembrokeshire as forty years previous but was sold unwrought. According to tradition the woolen manufacturing in West Wales declined in the 16c due to an epidemic of "the sweating sickness".

1600 October 1

Francis Meyrick was one of the signatories of a letter to the Mayor and Aldermen of the Town and County of Haverfordwest billeting 200 soldiers stranded by bad weather in the Haven, on their way to Ireland , in the town and County of Haverfordwest until the wind changes.

1600 October 1.

JOHN WOGAN, FRANCIS MEYRICK, JOHN PHILLIPES, HUGHE BUTLER and WILLIAM WARREN TO THE MAYOR AND  ALDERMEN  OF  THE  TOWN  AND COUNTY of HAVERFORDWEST .

Whereas John Johnson of Newe Castle upon Tyne, master and owner of the ship named The Danyell, being pressed lately at Bristoll for the carriage of two hundred soldiers for Her Majesty's service into Irelande, and being enforced by contrary and tempestuous winds to land in this haven of Milford, made special petition unto us whose names are subscribed for the placing of the said two hundred soldiers  in  some meet and convenient place during their abode here where they may be relieved with necessary vitual and provision until the wind serve for their passage hence into Ireland, we, considering that there is no place more convenient for the placing of them than the town and county of Haverfordwest, where they may be both relieved with vitual and kept best together by those that are officers over them, do therefore pray and entreat you to receive the said soldiers into your said town and to place and divide them according to your directions as in like case you have formerly done. So we refer care hereof unto you, not doubting but you shall be allowed of all such money as you or any of you shall defray  herein,  as heretofore you have been.

We betake you to God.

(Haverfordwest Corporation MS 213.)

1601 Robert Devereaux, 2nd Earl of Essex, and 3rd Viscount Hereford, held estates at Llamphey, great grandson of Walter Devereux, Lord Ferrers was executed by Elizabeth I with him died Sir Gelly Meyrick.

(Stuart Wales   W. S. K. Thomas).

1601 Sir Gelly Meyrick eldest son of Rowland Meyrick Bishop of   Bangor and Catherine, daughter of Owen Barrett of Gelliswick, Pembrokeshire was executed by Elizabeth I with his friend the Earl of Essex.

(Stuart Wales   W. S. K. Thomas).

1605 September 27.

Sir James PERROTT, Mayor, To William Thomas,  Chamber Reeve appointed  for the TOWN AND COUNTY OF HAVERFORDWEST.

For as much as William Walter, alderman, has disbursed divers sums of money towards the repair of the church windows and the conduit and for minister's wage and for divers other necessary uses and services within the said town, the particulars whereof doth appear by his account and amount to the sum of eleven pounds nine shillings eleven pence, these are to will and authorise you upon sight hereof to  satisfy and pay unto the said William Walter the said sum of £11 9s. 11 1/ 2d. out of the moneys by you collected of the chamber rents due in the said town, and this warrant shall be your sufficient discharge for so much.

(Haverfordwest Corporation MS. 475.)

1606 James I restored to Sir Gelly Meyrick's son and daughter their father's titles and estates.

 (Stuart Wales   W. S. K. Thomas).

1613  Robert Devereaux (1591- 1646) 3rd Earl of Essex  lived for a brief time 1613 at Lamphey

(Stuart Wales   W. S. K. Thomas).

1613 Lewis Dwnn Deputy Herald of Wales   records that John Devereux son of Patrick Devereux of Ireland married Margaret daughter of John Harris of the Hall Angle.

Henry Dawes whose wife was Lettice Walters of Roch Castle was living at Castlemartin probably during the lifetime of his father Griffith Dawes of Bangeston. Griffith Dawes wife was still alive in 1643 when she begged Lord Carbery leader of the Royalist forces at Tenby to spare the people of the area from his vow to plunder and sack the area she was the mother of eight sons and eight daughters and also had at the time four grandchildren all at Henllan. Sir John Carew was at Carew castle, Henry White of the White's of Tenby lived at Henllan, Pwllcrochan. Sir Hugh Owen of Bodowen Anglesey, who had married Elizabeth heiress of the Wyriotts, lived at Orielton. Their daughter married John Laugharne of St Bride's and another daughter married Henry Bowen of Upton Castle. Robert Lort lived at Stackpole. The Grandson of Robert Devereux Earl of Essex also called Robert had some property restored by James I. He seems to have lived at Lamphey and in 1620-1 he and John Meyrick of Fleet at Monkton near Pembroke, and Rowland Laugharne of St Brides fought in Holland .

1623 Sir John Carew High Sheriff

1626 Pembrokeshire (and Montgomeryshire) after angry county meetings refused to meet the royal request for a subsidy.

(Stuart Wales   W. S. K. Thomas).

1630 April 10th William Herbert, 3rd Earl of Pembroke died (of  apoplexy after a "full and chearful Supper") held various offices of importance under James I and Charles I acc/to Clarendon he was

"the most universally belov'd and esteem'd of any man of that age".

(Stuart Wales   W. S. K. Thomas).

1630s Puritans began to grow in South Pembrokeshire.

1635 Town of Pembroke protested about paying "ship money" (originally an occasional levy on coastal towns in lieu of providing a ship for the King's Service.  In 1635 Charles I extended it to all towns and counties as a means of raising money without recourse to Parliament).

(Stuart Wales   W. S. K. Thomas).

1642  Massacre of protestants during the Irish rebellion.

1642 Charles I quarrelled with the Earl of Essex and deprived him of his office and commands.

Many Pembrokeshire supporters of Essex joined the party of  Parliament.

1642 Lord Essex appointed Captain General of the Parliamentary Forces. Sir John Meyrick son of Francis Meyrick of Fleet, Monkton was with Essex .

1642-3 John Poyer, Mayor of Pembroke, put the town in a state of defence for Parliament. He also presented a Chalice each to St Mary's and St Michael's Church and equipped a squadron of ships for the defence of the area by sea.

 

1643 Royalists under Lord Carbery attacked and captured Tenby.

1643 Royalists besieged Pembroke Poyer and Rowland Laugharne of St Brides commanded the defence of the town Lord Carbery threatened to destroy all the houses around among those who went to Tenby to beg mercy of Lord Carbery was the elderly wife of Griffith White of Henllan, Pwllcrochan, who was the mother of eight sons and eight daughters and four times a grandmother. She like all the rest of the supplicants was badly received. Lord Carbery also promised to roll Poyer down a hill in a barrel pierced by nails.

1643 Pembroke garrison was relieved by the Parliamentary ships Swallow and Leopard. They went on the offensive capturing Stackpole which had been defended for the King by Roger Lort and a garrison of sixty,  Haverfordwest, were Sir Hugh Owen of Orielton was held prisoner  but he had been taken with his wife to Carmarthen . Roch Castle , and Tenby were retaken, and Poyer who had been appointed Colonel captured Carew.

1644 Charles 1 sent Colonel Gerard with an army to Pembrokeshire. He recaptured Haverfordwest, Roch and Carew laying waste to all the surrounding land he also captured Picton but was soon after a three week siege driven out and retreated to Glamorganshire.

Lord Essex and the Presbyterians and the Independents lead by Cromwell then split.

Lord Essex resigned his command to Sir Thomas Fairfax. Sir John Meyrick also resigned his post as Sergeant Major General both resignations disapproved of in the area.

1645 August 1   Laugharne decisively defeated the local royalist commanders, Stadling and Egerton, at Colby Moor, outside Haverfordwest taking 4 field guns, five barrels of gunpowder and eight hundred arms. (Stuart Wales   W. S. K. Thomas).

1646   Lord Essex died leaving no heir.

1647   The Scotch Presbyterians sold Charles 1 to the English Parliament 400,000 pounds

The Presbyterians and the Royalists seem to have joined in league against Cromwell and the Independents.

1648 Major General Rowland Laugharne commanding Pembroke Castle was ordered by Cromwell to disband his forces he refused and was imprisoned. Colonel John Poyer was threatened by Roger Lort of Stackpole and Griffith White of Henllan he retreated to Pembroke Castle . Colonel Fleming occupied Pembroke Town for Cromwell and attacked Poyer. Rowland Laugharne who had escaped from prison attacked Colonel Fleming's forces in the rear with a force from Tenby.

Fleming was defeated and Poyer and Laugharne fortified Pembroke for a siege.

1648 Two companies of foot part of the Cromwelian forces landed at Pwllcrochan.  Poyer attacked them but they fortified themselves in the Church agreed to let them re  embark with their banners and arms.

1648   Poyer attacked Henllan the owner Griffith White together with Colonel Fleming,  Robert Lort of Stackpole and John Lort of Prickeston managed to escape by water.

1648   Poyer and his forces marched to join Powell at Carmarthen they were rejoined by Laugharne but they were defeated in battle by the Cromwellian forces under Colonel Horton and forced to retreat back to Pembrokeshire.  Powell to defend Tenby and Laugharne and Poyer Pembroke.

1648 May

Colonel Horton captured Tenby.

1648 May 24th

Cromwell made his camp on the hill to the  south of Underdown he being at Welston.

1648 June 4th. He tried to storm the town but failed.

1648 June 13. Cromwell sited two small cannon to shell area around Dark Lane from across the water.

1648 July 11.

Short of provisions and after waiting in vain for the promised assistance Colonel Poyer and Colonel Rowland Laugharne were forced to surrender Pembroke Castle . Laugharne, Poyer and Powell were sent to the Tower.

1648 July 16 Rev Peregrine Phillips who held the living of Monkton from Sir Hugh Owen of Orielton,  St Mary's Pembroke from Sir Roger Lort of Stackpole, and Cosheston from Sir John Meyrick was invited by Cromwell to address the troops as it is said that he had to hide his flour in the bolster of his bed to avoid it being taken by the Cromwellian troops, one wonders what the subject of his sermon was.

1648 Roger Lort was commissioned by Cromwell to destroy Pembroke Castle .

1648 August 13.

[COLONEL] THOMAS HORTON TO GEORGE BEAVAN.

You are to repair with the party of Captain Bowlton's dragoons to St Davids in Pembrocksheere and with their assistance to bring from thence to Carmarthen 3000 weight of lead. You are to quarter where you think it most convenient, going and coming in the hundreds of Narbarth, Dewysland and Roose. And if the chief constables of the said hundreds negligent in providing you horses for the carriage of the lead. You shall quarter your whole party upon that constable that you shall find faulty until he conforms to what is expected. And this shall be your warrant for your thus doing. (Haverfordwest Corporation MS. 262).

1649 Laugharne,  Powell and Poyer were sentenced to death but it was decided that only one would be executed. The three drew lots and Poyer drew the blank.

1649 April 21st Colonel Poyer was executed by firing squad in the Piazza Covent Garden.

1649 Cromwell sailed from Tenby to Ireland with 3000 horse and foot.

1650 February 22 final adoption of the Act for the better Propogation and Preaching of the Gospel in Wales amongst the Commissioners appointed were Sir Erasmus Philipps of Picton Castle and Samual Lort of Stackpole Court. (Stuart Wales   W. S. K. Thomas).

1650 February 22 Act for the better propogation and preaching of the Gospel in Wales .  71 commissioners appointed most of them prominent Parliamentary supporters to investigate complaints against the clergy and to eject those whom they considered unfit. 196 deprived of their living in South Wales within 3 years offences included pluralism, ignorance, drunkenness, keeping an alehouse, or supporting the King.  A group of 25 Approvers were appointed to select "godly and painful men" to fill the vacant livings but their found the task well nigh impossible and a system of "itinerate" preachers was forced upon them.

The Act also attempted to establish a national system of schools. The approvers were charged with appointing suitable schoolmasters.  63 new schools were opened in the market towns of   Wales where children of both sexes were taught to read and write and count without paying fees. (The History of Wales  J. Graham Jones).

1660 Charles II restored to the throne.

1660 Charles II restored  John Barlow to Slebech.

[below  George Garret was agent to Leister, 6th Viscount Hereford (1617-76)]

1660 October 1 Boughwood [†Bowett farm near Hundleton].

Francis Meyrick to Mr George Garrett,

To defraud or contest with my lord, far be that thought from me.

It pleased you being my lord's agent, at your last being in the country to suffer me to continue tenent to those lands and tenements which I held that time of his lordship, not cutting down any timber or selling any furze from off the land, paying the rent and tithe of my corn as formally I did. I confess I ploughed up two acres in the wood wherein there has not been sown these fourty years and upward any corn, and I had part of the East Close in the parish of St Maries in corn also, for which I payed no tithe, nor did I formerly in regard it was part of the priory demesnes, and in my weak judgement if I had paid tithe wool, lambs, cheese and hay to the minister of the two parishes, which has nor been paid in any mans memory, and so consequently have predudiced my lord or his tenent who shall hereafter hold it, but rather than I will incure his lordship's displeasure I shall be willing to give his lordship any reasonable satisfaction.

     Sir, you know I pay a great rent for Broughwood, which is as much as any man will give unless it be one that will hold the plough himself. I have been at a great charge on it. It is a bare open space, neither succour for young cattle or sheep without the wood, and I have no encouragement either to manure, hedge or build on it, having no term, so that if you please to use the means whereby a lease of three lives or one and twenty years on it with the wood may be procured from his lordship, I shall not

be unmindful nor ungrateful to you for your love and favour therein.

Endorsed in another hand: 1 October 1660 Monncton. Captain Meyricke's letter.

(Glansevern MS. 7710.)

extracts from a letter from William Holcombe to Mr Georg Garett at Ipswich .

1660/1 February 21 Brownslate

Sir, as for Mounton farm ............But if you please my father and myself will give as much as any man alive can........always provided that we may have the wood with it that Captain Meyricke holds.......Mr Esix Meyricke does boast very freely that he will have the land again and do give out that the business is in suit with my honourable lord, and do pretend to bring it to be the King's land and do threaten that he will do strange matters to me and my father, so that I should be glad to hear from you.

(Glansevern MS. 7708.)

[William Holcombe was acting as local agent for George Garrett ]

1661 April 8. Boughwood.

Francis Meyrick to Mr George Garratt,

I am sorry I could not have my rent ready to send you by Mr Holcomb and withal that I must discover to you the unkindness of my nephew who is to pay me £20 on May day next, which Mr Holcomb

can signify unto you, yet although I aquainted him with my case at present he would not pay me until his day of payment came, which doth not a little trouble me. I hope my lord will not be so extreme as to take advantage of the forfeiture of my bond. God willing, his lordship's rent shall be paid to Mr. Holcomb upon his return.

     I hope my lord will be pleased I shall continue his tenent for what I do hold from him. Without the wood You know Boughwood to be a very barren, open place having no succour on it for cattle, and if you set it from me it is an impossible thing for me to avoid trespassing on it in regard it is so adjacent. I rest on you wholly to be my friend therin. The repairing of the old hedge will cost at least £6, and when it is repaired there are so many trespasses on it, and so poor that are not able to give satisfaction to him that questions them, so that there must be a charge laid out every year to keep it in repair. Sir, it is my

desire that my lord would grant me a lease of three lives to my use, that is my wife's life, her son's life and her daughter's life.

(Glansevern MS. 7711.)

1615

Johannes Meyrick genr. pro pauperbus   was mentioned as one of  the treasurers of the poor and mained soldiers within the county of Pembroke [ the funds appear to have been misdirected [£200 to a house of correction which was never made, £40 per year towards the relief of mained soldiers but only two paid in the county and they received £11 between them per annum, £12 yearly levy for the relief of poor persons   only £6 distributed. Money raised to repair St Katherins Bridge and other bridges  and the money converted to their own use.] (Bronwydd MS. 399.)

1642 Civil War Begins

1660 Monarchy restored.

1662 Roger Lort of Stackpole created Baronet he had fought on the Cromwellian side but was said "to favour no cause but his own" and to be of "any principle or religion to aquire wealth".

1662 April Act of Uniformity required all ministers to give their assent to the rites and liturgy of the Church.  130 Puritain ministers left their livings many being replaced with those they had ejected 12 years before. [The History of Wales  J. Graham Jones.]

1665 Great plague

1665 Five Mile Act prevented Nonconformist meetings in the towns. [The History of Wales  J. Graham Jones.]

1670

Estimated No, of Households in Pembroke hundred    6,635

Estimated Population of Pembrokeshire           31,535

("The Population of Wales in the 16 and 17th centuries"   Leonard Owen.)

1673 Test Act disqualified Dissenters from holding public office  unless they complied with a sacramental requirement.

(The History of Wales    J. Graham Jones.)

1689   The Tolerance Act of James II allowed Dissenters to worship in licensed unlocked meeting houses but they were still excluded from public office and universities until the repeal of the Test and Corporation Acts in 1828.

[The History of Wales    J. Graham Jones.]

1699 Society for the Promotion of Christian Knowledge founded. Sir John Phillips of Picton Castle had very close ties.

(Wales in Modern Times   David Evans.)

1721 Thomas Athoe was mayor of Tenby and was later hanged for murdering his nephew.

"Journeying home to Manorbier one night from a troublesome day at the market in Tenby he murdered his nephew”. There had been family rivalry for a while and the dark and narrow bridge over the Ritec was too good an opportunity for settling the quarrel. His trial and execution brought a certain notoriety to the town as he was found innocent by a court in Pembroke and it took the Court of the Kings Bench in Westminster and a New Act of Parliament ordaining "that all murders or robberies committed in, on or about the borders of Wales should be triable in any county in England" to finally bring him to justice.

1728 June 19.

John Warren and Ro[berT] Griffvth To The Churchwardens and

Overseers of The poor of The parrish of Eglwswrw.

Whereas Margarett the wife of David Evan of yow parish hath made oath before us John Warren and Robert Griffiths esquire, two of His Majesty's justices of the peace for the said county of Pembroke, that she is very poor and impotent and utterly unable to provide for herself and family, so that they must inevitably perish unless timely relieved, and that the last place of her legal settlement was and is in this the said parish, and that she the said Margarett applied herself to the overseers of the poor of the said parish as the law directs and was by them denied relief.

And having summoned the overseers of the poor of the said parish to shew cause why relief should not be given her the said Margarett, and they having appeared before us did not make any sufficient cause appear.

These are therefore in His Majesty's name to command you to pay unto the said Margarett a sum of sixpence per week for and towards the support and maintenance of the said Margarett and her family until such time as she the said Margarett shall be better able to provide for herself and family or that you shall be otherwise ordered to forbear making the said allowance. Given under our hands and seals.

(Bronwydd MS. 347).

1735 Stackpole links with Earls of Cawdor 18c Stackpole court mansion built in 1735-54 on an earlier site demolished.

18c Alexander Campbell heir to Cawdor Castle in Scotland married  Elizabeth Lort,  heiress to  Stackpole  Court .  Alexander was up at Cambridge with Elizabeth 's brother, Gilbert Lort and used to stay at Stackpole for a night or two before taking ship up the west coast to Fort William . On one occasion he was storm bound for several weeks; and romance blossomed.

1741

p23

Polling partisans of the Owen family of Orielton wielded pitchforks at polling in Pembroke 1741 to keep opponents out of the polling Hall. (Wales in the Eighteenth Century  edited by Donald Moore).

1748

Industries

Cartouche of a chart of the Coast of Wales in St Georges Channel drawn by Lewis Morris engraved bt Nathaniel Hill 1748 shows Woollen industry, shipbuilding, farming (reaping with a sickle?) Mining, Forestry, Fishing.

1750? Kiln Park

Lime kilns designed by John Nash [also designed Brighton Pavilion and Regent St .]

1752 - Under an Act of 1751 for "Changing the Style" Britain adopted the Gregorian Calendar widely used on the Continent and thus the year lost 11 days for September 2 1752 was followed by September 14th. (News from the English Countryside  1750-1850  Clifford Morsley).

1762 There was a secret Jacobite club called the "Society of Sea Serpents" which met annually at Tenby and existed until 1762.

(Wales in Modern Times - David Evans).

1767 March 25. The Exchequer, Lincoln 's Inn .

Fra[nci]s Skyrme To [The widow of Nathaniel Phillips?].

By desire of many neighbouring parishes I asked formerly a late worthy gentleman and you for liberty to enclose part of Narberth Mountain for a house, garden and field and to employ industrious poor people belonging to the subscribing parishes and by those means to reduce the poor rates, which was charitably granted, and pursuant thereto the enclosed memorial was drawn up and is signed by most of the gentlemen and ladies of property near the common.

I did not presume to trouble you with the enclosed plan immediately after our late loss which I doubt not your good sense, assisted by divine authority, has enabled you to bear with patience and resignation. All the subscribers are in hopes the enclosed will meet with the favour of your approbation, which alone will sufficiently patronize so laudable an undertaking for the interest of the poor, which your family was always remarkable for supporting. And if it shall be favoured with your concurrence I should be glad, Madam, of the honour of a line directed to me at the Exchequer in Lincoln 's Inn .

(Slebech MS. 813).

1770-1 or 1772-3 [Thomas Williams was mayor in 1770-1 and 1772-3].

The Mayor, Justice, Common Council, Burgesses and inhabitants of  the borough and Parish of St Mary, Tenby, to Charles [Moss], Bishop of St Davids.

Petition:

Humbly sheweth unto your lordship that we have lived in a very unhappy state in regard to our religious worship since our present rector has come here, whose vociferous method of  preaching is truely disagreeable to us. And though we have made frequent applications to him to preach by notes as his worthy predecessor always did, and all other clergymen of the Church of England still do, yet he obstinately persists in following his methodistical custom of preaching extempore, and that so harsh and unintelligible to all capacities as he has prevented many well disposed Christians from frequenting the church. This obstinate behaviour of our rector being truley grievous to your petitioners, they, by their churchwarden presented him in your lordship's court at Haverfordwest at your Lordship's last visitation, and also at two subsequent courts. In order to prevent your petitioners from having justice done then our rector has for these two years last past elected one Thomas Howells (a man of a despicable character) to be his churchwarden who acts agreeable to the rectors desire and has in his presentment contradicted your petitioners churchwarden's presentment. As your petitioners have hitherto had no redress, we humbly apprehend we have no other method of being relieved but by applying to your lordship by petition.

Your petitioners humble hope that your lordship will take their unhappy case into consideration; unhappy, we may truely say, as we cannot go to our own church with any comfort to hear his thundering incoherent doctrine, and grant us such relief as to your lordship shall see fit. [There were about 70 signatories].

1774 Dress of Pembrokeshire women  - a heavy cloth gown even in summer, and instead of a cap, a large handkerchief wrapt over their heads and tied under their chins. Large beaver hats were worn by both men and women in the Welsh speaking parts. There were few fences, horses and cattle were often tethered with their ropes often entangled across the highway.

1780's John Paul Jones reputed to have repeatedly "watered " his frigate "Ranger" at Caldy Island .

1790 John Wesley preached in Pembroke.

1792 February The French invasion of Pembrokeshire.

1794 circa [St Petrox]

extract from a Letter from Cha[rle]s Pigott Pritchett, rural dean of Pembroke, to William Stuart Bishop of St David's

..... The state of the churches in my district is now become so decent and in tolerable order that it is unnecessary for me to trouble your lordship with particulars. I wish I had as good an account to give of many of the vicarage houses . That of Nangle stands in most deplorable condition, next to it Mannerbier, St Twinnels and the vicarage at Stackpole want thorough repairs.

List of subscribers to the fund for the sons of the clergy

Lady Owen Orielton                            £1 1 0

John Campbell,esq., Stackpole        £5 0 0

John Mirehouse,esq.,Brownslade    £1 1 0

Revd C Prichard, St Petrox             £1 1 0    

Revd J Bowen, Rosecrowther         £1 1 0

Revd Mr Buckridge Pulchroan        £1 1 0

Revd G Jones Hogheston                   £1 1 0

Revd J Hughes Bosheston                 £1 1 0

Revd T Wood Curate of Pembroke     £0 10 6

Revd T Hancock, Vicar of St Florence  10 6

Revd H Wood, Curate of Bosheston   £0 10 6

(Church in Wales MS. AD/AET 1209).

(Pembrokeshire life 1572-1843).

1795 December 8. Holyland.

S[EPH] ADAMS TO JOhn CamPBELL ESQ.

I thank you for your kind letter which I received yesterday and perfectly agree with you in opinion relative to the exportation of corn, the supplying the markets, and also that no language should be held to irritate mob, but unhappily great cause was given for alarm by Roch of Paskeston and Hervey of Angle buying up wheat to export. The report from the magistrates to the Duke of Portland's letter was that wheat is the shortest crop and that there is certainly not enough in the country for its consumption. If then the middling class are sufferers, will they not complain, and their complaints go a great way to irritate the lower orders of people who have most intercourse with them?

The farmers had withheld from supplying the market for a fortnight to enhance the price (then too great), and notwithstanding every argument of policy and interest to them they would not be prevailed on until the people became tumultuous. Now they are justly alarmed, as are the corn factors. The farmers have promised a constant supply to the markets  and the factors will not export. So far good is come. from evil. You seem to think that party jealousies were the cause, but I do assure you I never saw all ranks, parties and classes of people so irritated (farmers and factors excepted) and all joining in the same language. The heat is now, thank God, allayed, and I trust no cause will be given to revive it, for then no one can pronounce what consequences will ensue.

Your name has been glanced at as acting in contradiction to the spirit of resolutions you brought  forward at the quarter sessions by letting Banjeston to Hervey.  I told Mr. Mirehouse of it, and  afterwards when it was reported he was concerned with Hervey.  I desired Mr Hand to tell him of it that he might justify himself: enclosed is his letter to me and my answer.  Since Hervey has declared Mirehouse is not concerned, but you'll see  by M's letter to me there was a plan which he says you were unacquainted with.  I mention this as I am zealous for your honour and think I should not act right by you in not aquainting you with it.

The  Fencibles with Captain Ackland and the Yeomanry paraded on Saturday last and will again next market day, so that I hope all will be quiet. But I repeat it depends on supplying the markets and no exportation.  I hope Lady  Caroline and the boys were well when you heard.

Miss Adams joins me in every good wish for you all.

Endorsed: Pray present my best respects to Mr. Greville when you see him.

(NLW.  MS. 1352 B. ff, 310 14,).

1796 March 29 Pembroke

Extract from a letter from J[oseph] Adams to John Cambell, esq.

.... I suppose you have heard of Miss Meyrick's death at Bath . She died without a will; consequently Mr Meyrick comes in for all her fortune about £5000. He is now at Bath . Mrs Meyrick goes there in a day or two, thence to London ........

(NLW. MS. 1352 B.ff. 333  9).

1797 February 17th. A force sailed from Brest consisting of a lugger and a corvette escorted by two frigates containing several hundred released jailbirds and galley slaves under the command of an American adventurer named Colonel Tate ordered by the Directory to land and "burn Bristol the second city in England for riches and commerce" and thereafter to land in Wales, march across the mountains and do the same to Chester and Liverpool.

The raiders sailed into the Bristol Channel and turned tail when they say what they thought was a warship. It was the Dublin packet boat;  then went to Fishguard anchored on Feb 22nd force landed in a rocky cove below Carregwastad Point. The Vessels had been sited, and the alarm raised.. Lord Cawder mustered the Castlemartin Yeomanry, Cardigan Militia and Fishguard Volunteers (Local militia units) and they marched seaward from the village of Llanwnda followed it is said by the women of the area wearing their red cloaks..although the French outnumbered the militia 3 to 1 on seeing the advancing militia Colonel Tate ordered his men to stand firm them went forward and surrendered himself and his army to Lord Cawder unconditionally "upon principles of humanity". The main problem of the volunters was preventing the enraged Welsh villagers from cutting the throats of the French prisoners as they were marched of to jail.  25 of the French captured after the invasion at Fishguard chatted up some girls in Pembroke and enlisted their aid in escaping they stole Lord Cawder's Yacht and sailed to France .

(Acc/to Journal 1885 Vol XLI of the Congress of British Archeological Society).

1797

Feb 17th 1797 a force sailed from Brest consisting of a lugger and a corvette escorted by two frigates containing several hundred released jailbirds and galley sales under the command of an American adventurer named Colonel Tate ordered by the Directory to land and "burn Bristol the second city in England for riches and commerce" and thereafter to land in Wales, march across the mountains and do the same to Chester and Liverpool.

The raiders sailed into the Bristol Channel and turned tail when they say what they thought was a warship  it was the Dublin packet boat then went to Fishguard anchored on Feb 22nd force landed in a rocky cove below Carregwastad Point. The Vessels had been sited, and the alarm raised.. Lord Cawder mustered the Castlemartin Yeomanry, Cardigan Militia and Fishguard Volunteers (Local militia units) and they marched ­seaward from the village of Llanwnda followed it is said by the women of the area wearing their red cloaks..although the French outnumbered the militia 3 to 1 on seeing the advancing militia Colonel Tate ordered his men to stand firm them went forward and surrendered himself and his army to Lord Cawder unconditionally "upon principles of humanity". The main problem of the volunters was preventing the enraged Welsh villagers from cutting the throats of the french prisoners as they were marched of to jail.

The surrender was signed in the Royal Oak Inn in Fishguard and the French were marched to prison in Pembroke. (Welsh Walks and Legends   Showell Styles).

According to Roger Worsley; two local girls Eleaner Martin and Ann Beach fell for some of the French and helped them escape. The French dug a tunnel and the girls took away the spoil in yoked tubs pretending it to be sewage. The tunnel was over 60yds long . They all then got away by stealing the yacht belonging to Lord Cawder.

1801 Occupied Houses in Pembroke Hundred           11,869

("The Population of Wales in the 16 and 17th centuries"   Leonard Owen).

1814 The average wage for an outdoor labourer was 5d a day in winter and 7 1/2d a day in summer.

During the early part of the century labourers received a cottage and potato plot at a low rent and their fuel completely free, but by the end of the century these benefits had almost disappeared. (Wales in Modern Times   David Evans).

1815 When the wars with France came to an end in 1815, food prices fell and many farmers were ruined. The plight of the labourers became even worse and many were forced to migrate to the growing industrial towns in Glamorgan and Gwent and some even went even further afield, to England . The wages offered by the iron masters attracted large numbers from rural Wales . Some sold their land and possessions and left for good, others worked for only part of the year at the furnace or mine and returned during the summer months to their farms to help with the harvest. (Wales in Modern Times   David Evans).

1817 Very poor Harvest. (Wales in Modern Times   David Evans).

1828 repeal of the Test and Corporation acts allowing Nonconformists to hold public office and attend Universities.

(The History of Wales    J. Graham Jones).]

.................................................................................................................................................................

(The Elizabethan Squirearchy in Pembrokeshire B. Howells. (Pembrokeshire Historian Vol. 1 p 25.))

1583 Morgan Powell of Greenhill was a member of the Bristol branch of the Spanish Company till Elizabeth 's war with Spain from 1592 he had trading contacts with Bristol , La Rochelle and Newfoundland .

Other squires who figured prominently in the Port books of Milford include:

John Butler of Coedcanlas

Thomas Laugharne of St Brides

Sir John Perrot

[who regularly exported grain to Gloucestershire]

John Wyrriot of Orielton

Griffith White of Henllan

John Scourfield of Newmoat

John Adams of Paterchurch

Sir Francis Meyrick of the Fleet, Monkton

John Meyrick brother of Sir Francis

William Longueville

Sir Hugh Owen of Orielton

[at the end of Elizabeth 's reign was sending wheat, barley and pilcorn to Carnarvon]

Rice Phillips Scarfe of Lamphey

1601

Thomas Powell a close relative of Morgan Powell was factor for John Juhulls purveyor for the province of Leinster .

Industry:

George Barlow had a busy iron forge at Blackpool East Cleddau.

Coal Mining:

Talbenny

Llangwn

Johnston

Freystrop

Picton

Jeffreston

Begelly

St Issells

Silver Mining:

John Voyle and Sir Thomas Canon   St Elvis parish

Profession of arms:

Among those who followed Walter Devereux and his son Robert to Ireland and the Low Countries were: 

Sir Thomas Perrot brother of Sir James Perrot of Haroldston.

Sir Gelly Meyrick perhaps one of the most successful soldier adventurers of the age. Starting luckily,  he had entered the service of Sir George Devereux of Lamphey as a page, and later served with Walter,  Earl of Essex, in the Low Countries , where he formed a close attachment to the young Robert Devereux, becoming eventually his confidante and chief agent.

Steward to the young Earl who secured Wigmore Castle for him, he was reputed to have abused his position in order to line his own pockets, though after his marriage to the wealthy and childless widow Mrs Gwynn of Llanelwedd he had a small fortune at his disposal.

Moreover, war was not without its compensations; after the Cadiz attack of 1596, Sir George Carew delivered him 1723 pounds 10 shillings as his share of the spoils, and apart from that he was later accused of concealing 600 Barbary hides, a chest of plate, pearls, and amber, and a large quantity of precious fabric.  By the time of the Essex conspiracy he was a prominent landowner with lands  scattered throughout a number of counties a man substantial enough to marry off his daughter to Sir John Vaughan of Golden Grove.

Sir Francis Meyrick

Captain Richard Cluny of Welston and Golden

Feuds:

1582

Griffith White of Henllan had raised crops on some land at Rhoscrowther which was in some dispute between him and Sir John Perrot [who seems to have been the villain of the piece] Perrot allowed the crops to grow, but at dawn on the 28th August some twenty or so of his retainers, armed with pitchforks and daggers, travelled with eleven carts to the land in dispute with the intention of carrying away the crops to the nearest Perrot farmhouse. They were  spotted and soon encountered Griffith White who tried slashing the traces of the horses. He was overpowered and held to the ground at the point of a pitchfork, though the intervention of his sons Harry and George saved him from injury. White, a JP., now ordered the constable of Roscrowther parish, one of his own men, to call on his opponents to disperse in the Queen's name, and at the same time he exhorted his neighbours to intervene with their arquebuses, bows and arrows. Perrot's men fled upon the appearance of the later, thereby terminating what might have been an encounter of larger proportions.

1562 Walter James leased Hodgeston rectory with its barns, stables, orchards, and outhouses to William Loughor, but the indenture fell into Perrot's hands and he entered into possession so that James had to appeal to the Court of Chancery for redress. (PCC Evans "Sir John Perrot" p. 46.)

1585 David Griffith of Jeffreston and John Gibbon of St Florence were accused of seizing and detaining copies of court rolls and other deeds to the prejudice of Thomas Tanke, a Haverfordwest merchant. (E. G. Jones ed Exchequer proceedings (Equity)  concerning Wales 1939 p. 301).

1598 Complaint made by Nicholas Adams of Paterchurch against Thomas Canon.

(E. G. Jones ed Exchequer proceedings (Equity)  concerning Wales 1939 p. 307).

Bibliography.

Pembrokeshire Historian Vol. 1.

The reformation in Pembrokeshire down to 1553 by Prof.   Glanmor Williams.

Wales in Modern Times   David Evans.

Welsh Walks and Legends   Showell Styles.


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