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Kilgetty     (125073)

Kilgetty. A sprawling and somewhat untidy place which was once a coal-mining village but which has grown rapidly in recent years as a result of the Tenby-Saundersfoot holiday boom. Now a retirement and holiday village. Chiefly notable nowadays for a large supermarket, a well-appointed Information Centre (run jointly by the National Park Authority and the South Wales Tourism Council), AA and RAC breakdown centres, and a glassmaking workshop.

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L

Lambston, Lampeter Velfrey, Lamphey, Landshipping, Lawrenny & Cresswell, Letterston, Little Haven, Little Newcastle, Llandewi Velfrey, Llandeilo Llwydarth, Llandeilo, Llandeloy, Llanfair Nantygof, Llandissilio, Llanfair Nant Gwyn, Llanfallteg west, Llanfihangel Penbedw, Llanfyrnach, Llangan, Llangolman, Llangwm, Llanhowel, Llanllawer (Llanhawer), Llanreithan, Llanrhian, Llanstinan, Llantood, Llantyd, Llanvyrnach, Llanwnda, Llanycefn, Llanychaer, Llanychlwydog, Llawhaden, Llysyfran, Loveston, Ludchurch, Lydstep.

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Lambston

(Acc/to South Pembrokeshire Place Names – P. Valentine Harris.)

Lambston. 1291, Villa Lambert. 1321 Lamberteston. ‘Lamhert’s tun.’ Probably from a Flemish personal name.

Church St Ismael medieval church in raised circular churchyard restored 1890 and 1915.

(Acc/to The Topographical Dictionary of Wales S. Lewis 1834.)

Lambston a parish in the hundred of Rhos, county of Pembroke, 3 mile WNW from Haverfordwest containing 286 inhabitants.

This parish, which is situated in the western part of the county and at no great distance from St Brides Bay comprises a considerable tract of enclosed and cultivated land with an extensive common and is intersected by a small rivulet which falls into the western Cleddau.

The living is a perpetual curacy in the archdeaconry and diocese of St David’s endowed with £200 royal bounty, and in the patronage of the master and fellows of Pembroke College Oxford. There is a place of worship open to dissenters of every denomination. A parochial school for the gratuitous instruction of poor children is supported at the expense of the incumbent. The average annual expenditure for the maintenance of the poor amounts to £66 15s.

(RCAM., Pembroke 1920 No 357.)

The Church was much restored in the last decade of the 19c. It consists of a chancel, nave and a single bell cote. The chancel arch is pointed; above it are two projecting corbels which support the rood beam. In the north west angle are traces of a squint to the nave, now blocked.

(Acc/to The Old Parish Churches of South West Wales – Mike Salter 1994). The nave and chancel with a plain pointed arch connecting them plus the font are of c1200. There is a fine old roof and one 15c north window. There are corbels for a former rood beam. The church was heavily restored in the 1890’s.

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons).

This benefice was originally a curacy, and belonged to the prior of St. Thomas, Haverfordwest, who on 12 Nov., 1324, obtained a mortmain licence from the King to appropriate the church of St. Ishmael, in the town of lambertys in Ros. This grant was again set on record on 10 June, 1505. - (Pat. Rolls).

This church, described as Eccles1a de villa Lamberti, was in 1291 assessed at £4 13s 4d. for tenths to the King, the amount payable being 8s. 4d. - (Taxatio).

No detailed description of this living is given in the Valor Eccl., merely the following valuation under the heading of ‘Churches appropriated to the Priory of St. Thomas, Haverfordwest':- Ecclesia de Lamston per annum IIIj’I.

On the dissolution of the priory of St. Thomas, Lambston Church came into the hands of the King from whom a lease of the rectory of Llamerston was on 2 Aug., 1538, obtained for 21 years by Henry Jones of the Household. - (State Papers).

On 10 May, 1545 A lease of the same rectory was granted by the Crown for 21 years to the same Henry Jones. - (State Papers). This was probably a renewal of the previous lease.

The living of Lamston (with Haroldston West) afterwards came into the hands of the Picton Castle family, and was, with Haroldston West, given in 1749 by Sir John Phil1pps of Picton Castle, to Pembroke College, Oxford. The living of Lambson was united with that of Haroldston West.

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Lampeter Velfry    (SN 153144)

(Acc/to South Pembrokeshire Place Names – P Valentine Harris.)

Lampeter (Llanbedr) Velfry. ‘Velfry’ represents the earlier ‘Evelfre,’ the name of a small princedom which appears to have been ruled by independent chiefs. It covered Lampeter, Llanddewi and Crinow.

St Peter.

(Acc/to The Old Parish Churches of South West Wales – Mike Salter 1994.)

The nave and north transept may be 13c but the chancel has two 14c windows and there is a 14c south aisle with a five bay arcade. One south window and the altar tomb of the Phillips’s of Lampeter are 17c. Medieval bellcote and early English additions.

List of rectors from 1350.

(Acc/to the Topographical Dictionary of Wales 1834 S. Lewis.)

Lampeter Velvrey (Llan-bedr Velvre).

A parish in the hundred of Narberth, County of Pembroke, 3 miles E from Narberth containing 984 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated in the rich and fertile vale of Lampeter and on the south side of the river Marlais, extends for nearly 6 miles from east to west and about 3 miles from north to south. The surrounding scenery is pleasingly varied; and the parish which is of considerable antiquity, contains several objects of interest to the antiquary. Limestone is found here in abundance and is quarried for building purposes, and also burnt into lime as manure for the supply of the surrounding country. The living is a rectory in the archdeaconry of Carmarthen, and diocese of St David’s rated in the king’s books at £10, and in the patronage of the king as Prince of Wales. The church dedicated to St Peter is a very old structure consisting of two aisles separated by plain pointed arches. In the north aisle is an altar tomb to a member of the family of Philipps of Lampeter house, which seat is now the property of Captain Twyning. There are places of worship for Baptists and Independents. A parochial school for the gratuitous instruction of poor children is supported by public subscription. John Jones M.D in 1698 bequeathed certain lands and tenements for the relief of poor families and for apprenticing poor children of the parishes of Lawrenny, Cosheston, St David’s and Lampeter Velvrey, now producing a considerable sum annually which is distributed in proportion to the number of deserving objects in the different parishes A posting inn at the entrance of the county from Carmarthen distinguished by the name of Tavern spite occupies the site of the ancient "Taverne y spitty" an hospitium formerly belonging to Whitland Abbey upon the banks of the river Taf, and Blaengwyddnoe, now a farm house was the grange of that religious establishment. To the southwest of the latter place are some very extensive earthworks called Castel Maherin, on the summit of a high ridge commanding a full view of the sea and forming one of a chain of forts continued in a north westerly direction along this part of the coast and in a field adjoining the turnpike road a little to the north east are two semi circular embankments, commanding the passage of three several valleys. The average annual expenditure for the support of the poor is £331 3s.

(Acc/to The Pembrokeshire Coast National Park by Dillwyn Miles.)

The name means "the church of St Peter in Efelfre" a district in the Welsh hundred of Cantref Gwarthaf and, later, in the lordship of Narberth. The parish church is dedicated either to Pedyr, a Welsh saint or to the apostle Peter. It was restored in 1862 and has a number of memorials, including a Jacobean altar tomb in the Lady Chapel.

At one time it was said that the Ark came to rest at Blaengwaith Noah but the name is a corruption of Blaen Gwyddno "the source of the Gwyddno". There is a promontory fort overlooking the Gwyddno valley and a hill fort nearby at Castell Meherin.

Six roads meat at Tavenspite where there was a hospice for pilgrims travelling to St David’s. The Milford Mail changes horses at the Plume of Feathers. Fulke Grenville fought a duel here with John Jones of Ystrad against whom he had lost the election of 1831.

Prof. Glyn Daniel, the famous archaeologist was born at Lampeter Velfrey.

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

The rectory from the year 1351 appears to have been appendant to the lordship of Narberth although George Owen omits to state that it was so.

This church was in 1291 assessed at £8 for tenths to the King. - (Taxatio).

Llanbeder Wylfre—Magister Thomas Lloyd rector ibidem eommunibus annis valet dare £10. Inde decima, 20s. - (Valor Eccl.)

Under the heading "Livings remaining in Charge":- Llan Bedr Velfry alias Llanpetr R- (St. Peter). The King or Prince of Wales. King’s Books, £10, £100. Yearly tenths, £1. - (Bacon’s Liber Regis.)

(Acc/to Church guide by Rev. Canon M. G. R. Morris.)

Parish Church – St Peter’s.

Lampeter Velfrey – welsh Llanbedr Efelffre – maeans the sacred enclosure of Peter in Efelffre – (ancient Welsh commote which also covered Llanddewi Velfrey and Crinow).

Church – most of the walls, font and part of arcade 13c. Site older – roofs, windows bellcote and furnishings mostly from 1860-2. Building 65 foot long.

Bell cast by Thomas Stone in 1639.

West window replaced a doorway in 1860. 13c arches restored in 1860 second pillar from the west and the wider pillar which originally stood near the lectern were removed in 1839 and when restored the pillar was replaced with a pillar which made the second arch from the east unsymmetrical

Font probably Norman.

Pews date from 1860 – Up to 1839 the church was crammed with small box pews on a beaten earth floor. In the south west corner the seats once rose in tiers – suggested that this was the singing gallery mentioned in 1756.

Stalls, pulpit and rectors reading desk – teak – about 1860 but not in their original positions.

Under carpet below the chancel step is the memorial slab of Francis Philipps of Upper and Lower Waungron - (latter the Cisterian Convent of the Holy Cross) – He was High Sheriff of Pembrokeshire 1679 and was buried in 1681. Organ installed 1853.

Inner door to the porch and small niche above probably 13c outer arch 1860 by Prichard and Seddon.

Pre-1837 windows were square headed wooden casements present stone tracery windows date from 1860-62.

Churchyard Cross site said to be 14c but the cross itself is a copy.

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Lamphey

Very old village with free standing "Flemish" Chimney.

Seems to have belonged to the Diocese of St David’s by 1096 for that year the Bishop was there during the seige of Pembroke Castle.

Bishops palace once residence of Bishops of St David’s. Earliest surviving document dated from the Palace at Lamphey was issued in 1259, during the episcopate of Richard de Carew but Welsh Bishops of St David’s had already chosen Lamphey as a rural retreat before the Normans came.

After the reformation and the time of Bishop Barlow, who neglected all the See’s Pembrokeshire property, as he wished to remove the See to Carmarthen, the manor was given up to the Crown, who in 1546 passed into the Devereux family and Robert Earl of Essex, favourite of Queen Elizabeth spent his boyhood there.

Nearby, the imposing Lamphey Court outwardly well preserved house in the Classical Revival style of the 1820’s.

The church in the village has a Norman tower, but was largely rebuilt in the nineteenth century.

In Norman times a Demesene consisted of several strips widely scattered in several fields of varying size.

The manor of Lamphey had 6 fields some of which were more than 100 acres in area.

Promontory Forts.

Freshwater East Camp.

This camp is placed at the end of a broad promontory overlooking Freshwater Bay. The landward approach from the north is defended by two lines of slightly curved ramparts. The inner bank has a length of 70 feet, rising from the interior level to a height of 10 feet and falling 20 feet to a ditch having a width of 10 feet, and for the greater part trenched out of rocky ground. The other bank, which has been much disturbed, is about 20 yards beyond the inner defence. It has a length of 45 feet, is lower than the main bank, and its ditch is practically obliterated the entrance faced east; that through the main rampart is 10 feet wide.

Bishops Palace.

It is probable that a residence of the bishops of St. Davids existed at Lamphey from a very early period.

The structure as it at present consists of two parts, an Eastern and a Western wing, connected by a gateway that stands about midway between them. The western wing is the earlier, and may date from the time of Richard de Carew, during whose episcopate the earliest surviving document it that emanated from the palace of Lamphey was issued in the year 1259. A considerable length of outer walling is unbroken by a window fronting the exterior, whilst the top of the wall is battlemented and loopholed. Against this wall, and looking across the courtyard, was the hall measuring about 80 feet by 20 feet; above there seems to have been a series of dormitories The other living rooms were doubtless arranged round the courtyard, but all traces of them have vanished above ground.

Whatever kind of eastern wing may then have existed, it was completely removed about 1330, and a building was erected on this portion of the site probably by Bishop Henry Gower soon after his appointment to the see. The frontage of the mansion was thus considerably extended, both wings being connected with an archway, the lower parts of which show it to have been constructed prior to Bishop Gower’s time, and to have been merely altered and beautified by him. The outer wall of this wing is surmounted by a strikingly effective parapet of arched openings similar to what is known to be Gower's work in the ruined bishop’s palace at St. David's, and in the upper walls of the castle of Swansea. Professor Freeman considered the work at Lamphey to be "a mere bungling imitation of his Gower’s work at St. David's from a later hand," but it is more likely to represent Gower’s first attempt. A number of chambers are named in the survey of Lamphey taken after the dissolution of the monasteries, but these with their undercrofts have so far disappeared as to leave indications of their respective purposes. There must, of course, always have been a Chapel within the precincts of the palace; at any rate the ruins of one stands within the quadrangle parallel with Gower’s wing; it may be of his erection, and was probably structurally connected with the residence. The exterior walls of this chapel still remain; the eastern gable holds a beautifully proportioned Perpendicular window. The chapel was dedicated to St. Mary.

Lamphey.

The palace of the Bishops of St David’s from the C 13 and probably much earlier and until the mid C16. It has important surviving works which have been associated with Bishops Richard Carew, Henry de Gower and Edward Vaughan. The palace was surrendered to the Crown by Bishop William Barlow in 1546, whence it was granted to Richard Devereux (and the line of the Earls of Essex). In 1683, probably after damage in the Civil War, the palace was sold to the Owens of Orielton and in 1821 to Charles Mathias. In the time of Owen tenure the buildings were neglected or converted to farm use, but preservation commenced under the Mathias family followed by H. M. Office of Works and Cadw.

Early C13: Fragments remain of the Old Hall and its undercroft. It is not clear with which bishop this first surviving work is associated. In the hall, there were two lancets at north, one blocked, a hearth at South with a round chimney above. In the undercroft: slit windows with wide embrasures. Local limestone rubble. Alterations in C16.

Late C13: (associated with Bishop Carew): the Western Hall (replacing the old hall which became a kitchen) and its undercroft. The hall has a fireplace at the centre of the North wall. An attached latrine block at the SE corner. Undercroft: windows with stepped high sills above what appear to be seats. In the walls are the sockets of the floor joists carrying the original timber floor laid above a longitudinal bridging joist. Local limestone with dressings in coarse freestone.

In later centuries the Western Hall continued as the main hall of the Palace. The undercroft was vaulted over. Windows converted to Tudor form. An attic storey and a new latrine block at South were added.

Early C14: (associated with Bishop Gower): A long narrow hall (or suite of rooms?) and undercroft added at the E of the Palace. The main stairs are against the North wall, above the undercroft porch. There are corbels for a roof sheltering the stairs. The hall was roofed with six trusses, for the wall-posts of which there are corbels about 1.5 m above floor level. Pairs of trefoil-headed lancet windows with window seats. The E end of the hall is served by a fireplace with a conical chimney. A latrine wing is attached at SW. At the top of the walls is an arcaded parapet, of less developed type than that of Bishop Gower at St David’s. Local limestone rubble with sandstone dressings.

This building has a fine undercroft which now appears as a single vault, slightly pointed at the apex. The springings of several of the eleven cross-ribs survive, but the ribs have almost completely disappeared and the straight construction joints in the stonework above rib positions are visible.

A building at the East of the inner ward containing additional accommodation may be contemporary.

Early C16: (associated with Bishop Vaughan): Fragments of a chapel with a modern gateway at the E. Sacristy at N. Fragments of Tudor windows. A fine Perpendicular E window survives.

Wards: The inner ward gatehouse, now standing in isolation two storeys, with gatekeeper’s room above. Altered stairs at N. incorporating a mounting block. Pitched floor in the gateway. Shallow vaulted floor above. In the NE corner of the upper room there is a fireplace. Parapet arcading after the Gower style.

There remain fragments of an extensive outer ward, to the N and W of the main buildings. Here the most important structure was Bishop Vaughan’s great corn barn, the lower part of the N wall of which survives. Also fragments of the outer gatehouse. A later outer precinct wall to the S facing the stream and fishponds.

A detailed inventory of the goods of Bishop Rawlings lists the following rooms of the late Bishop at his manor place of Lantefey, with their contents, providing an idea of the extent of the building at the Dissolution. It is as follows:-

The Bishop’s own chamber "where he was accustomed to take his rest, and where he died".

The Chamberlain’s chamber.

The Checkered chamber.

The Great Chamber.

The gardine chamber.

The Gloucester chamber.

The next chamber to the Gloucester chamber.

The Parker’s chamber.

The Steward’s chamber.

The next chamber.

The Porter’s chamber.

The Cooks chamber.

The Painter’s chamber

The Barbers chamber.

The Brewer (chamber).

The Under Cook’s chamber.

The Chapel chamber.

The second chamber within the Chapel chamber.

The Chapel.

The Hall.

The Paramour

The Wine Cellar.

The Buttery

The Pantry.

The Kitchen.

The Larder House.

The Fish Larder House.

The Bakehouse.

The Brewhouse

The Malthouse.

Oxhouse.

The Park.

List of Books in the study.

Lamphey St Tyfei Parish of Lamphey.

Even before 1851 this church had been "fearfully modernized" (Arch Camb., II, ii, 821), and it was further "restored" in 1870. It has now little of antiquarian interest except its west tower and its font. On plan the building is cruciform – the chancel being 19 feet by 22 feet, nave 86 feet by 22 feet, north transept 17 feet by 16 feet, south transept 9 feet by 8 feet. The modern reconstruction followed the original lines. The windows have been renewed, but two lancets on either side of the chancel preserve portions of the work described by Freeman as "two remarkable trefoil lancets ... with deep Early English jamb mouldings" (Arch. Camb., 1852, II, iii.). In the south wall of the chancel is a Piscine with a pointed arch. A squint-passage connects the chancel with the north transept. When Sir Stephen Glynne visited the church in 1845 the south transept was "A small chapel, made into a pew, opening by a very rude and low obtuse arch." The font basin is square, 26 inches outside, 20 inches inside measurement; it is of the regular Norman type; its sides are ornamented with a band of six-pointed stars. It stands on a circular shaft, with cable mouldings around the top of the pillar, and is one of the best preserved fonts in the county. The tower is of three storeys, the lowest having a plain vault; it is unbuttressed, slightly-tapered, and finished with a corbel table and battlements. The stair turret is at the north-east angle. The belfry lights are double; the rest single slits It opens to the nave by a plain pointed arch. The exterior doorway in the west wall and the window above are modern insertions.—Visited, 18th May, 1922. (Arch. Camb., 1886, V, iii, 5fi).

The parish of Lamphey was also a manor of the Bishopric of St David’s.

The church has repositioned fragments of C13 architectural detail in the chancel – a Piscine and two lancet windows, and there is early masonry surviving at the bases of walls, particularly the N transept. At the W end is a C14 / C15 tower. In the C19 the church underwent extensive restoration to the point of rebuilding, to counteract the effects of earlier extensive improvements. Its plan, however, is unchanged.

In 1811 the use of the little south chapel or transept as the private pew of Portclew House, with its own fireplace, is mentioned, and it was still a pew in 1845. Also mentioned in 1845 was the fact that all the nave windows had been converted to sashes, a modern ceiling inserted, and the North door blocked. These latter improvements may date from 1826, when the church was thoroughly repaired and re-pewed to achieve 200 additional sittings. In 1845 four Early English trefoil-headed lancet windows still survived in the chancel, but in 1852 only two were noted. The church was thoroughly restored in 1869-71 by Ewan Christian, architect of London.

The churchyard cross was removed in c. 1830 to a neighbouring farm.

Exterior: Nave and chancel under one uninterrupted roof, with porch and small transept at South and a larger transept at North. Local masonry in irregular courses Roofs of large slates with crested tile ridges and stone gable-parapets Cross finial at East. All rainwater heads carry the date 1870. Signs of a blocked doorway are visible at low level in the North wall of the nave.

There is a tall tower of three storeys at W. slightly battered with crenulated parapet on corbels. At its NE corner is a stairs turret, projecting on the N side only. The tower masonry is randomly coursed with large stones at the quoins. Double belfry lights to East and West. Single belfry lights to North and South.

Interior: The chancel is 5.5 m long by 6.5 m wide, with two lancets (re-set in the C19 masonry). The nave is 11 m by the same width, with transepts overlapping the chancel: the North transept opens to the nave by an unusual arch which is an incomplete segment, and also connects with the chancel by a small squint. The South transept or chapel is now the vestry. The tower, at the West end, is vaulted.

Memorials include a Gothic one to Charles Mathias (d. 1831).

An exceptional Norman font of cushion type, three lobes and a band of six-pointed stars carved on each face. It has a short round column with a cable-moulding at top and bottom. Square base on modem octagonal step. There are traces of whitewash.

The churchyard wall is built up to the corners of adjacent buildings (school and bakery). Rubble stonework with a coping of spaced upright stones in mortar. At the NW corner there is a modern lych-gate in memory of Anthony Mathias: two stone piers with a simple moulding and an oak roof, on which are slates taken from Lamphey Court.

(Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

Very little is known of the early history of this church.

It was apparently appendant to the Manor of Lamphey, which was owned by the Bishop of St. Davids, as in the grant of the manor of Lamphey made by Bishop William Barlow to King Henry VIII. The patronage of the church of Lamphey is expressly reserved to the bishop and his successors. - (Fenton’s Pem.)

Lantesey.—Vicaria ibidem ex collacione episcopi Mene-vensis unde Morganus Philpe est rectorus et valet pet annum cum gleba in cases et oblacionibus sine garba. inde sol’ annuatim arehidaciono pro sinodalibus et pro-curacionibus Pro paste sua ij8. Et remanet dare 108s. Inde decima 10s. gild. - (Valor Eccl.)

Under the heading ‘Livings Discharged‘:— Lamfey alias Uamphey alias Laantiffi GJ (St. Faith). Syn. And Prox., 2S. Val. Per ann. In decima., cas., oblat. &c. Bishop of St. Davids Patr. And Imps. Clear yearly value £5. King’s Books, £5 8s. 1d. - (Bacon’s Liber Regis.)

The only lease of this parsonage mentioned among the cathedral records was on 20 June, 1638, when with its glebe together with the parsonage of Waren, it was demised for 21 years by the Bishop to Thomas Mayland gent at the annual rent of £26 13s 4d.

Clergy.

Bridde Walter 1402 Lamphey vicar

Tyler Bernard 1402 Sep 23 Lamphey vicar

Mendus William 1487 Lamphey vicar

Garden Robert 1560 Oct 2 Lamphey vicar

Byrbeck Hylbert 1608 Lamphey vicar from Westmoorland.

Price Thomas 1619 Jan 24 Lamphey

Mountford John 1650 Lamphey vicar

Beddo Lewis 1668 Aug 9 Lamphey vicar

Thomas David 1718 Mar 12 Lamphey vicar

Edwards Thomas 1735 Aug 5 Lamphey vicar Thomas Moses 1742 Feb 22 Lamphey vicar Hughes Joseph 1745 Jul 31 Lamphey vicar Evans Lewis 1774 Mar 7 Lamphey vicar Jones George 1817 Mar 1 Lamphey vicar

Byers James Broff 1824 Jan 16 Lamphey vicar

Williams Stephen 1867 Aug 2 Lamphey vicar

Williams Thomas Beynon 1892 Jun8 Lamphey vicar Wolfe Godfrey 1898 May7 Lamphey vicar

Fowden John Davies 1912 Dec 20 Lamphey vicar

Cross.

Built into the wall of a garden immediately opposite the churchyard gate is a slab of limestone on which is carved a cross-with rounded projections midway on either side of the cross arms

20 m North of the Lychgate of Lamphey Church.

A mediaeval grave slab set upright into the garden wall of the Old School House. Possibly the slab was taken up when extensive improvements were carried out to the church in 1826 and removed here when the schoolmaster’s house and its garden were formed shortly afterwards. It was in its present position when reported in the Inventory in 1925.

The slab consists of a single slab of limestone at least 1.8 m long (high), by 15 cm thick, and tapering from about 45 to 40 cm in width. On its front (now facing the road) is an incised cross in very shallow double lines, extending to all edges of the stone. Midway in each arm is a rounded shape. The sides and rear of the stone, so far as visible, are rough-hewn. No inscription has been seen.

Listed as a mediaeval carved stone.

Churchyard Cross.

(Acc/to the Pembroke. Arch Survey.) The shaft of the churchyard cross (destroyed about 1830), which formerly stood on the north side of the church, on a site in the school-house garden marked by an oak tree, was removed to North Hill Farm, Lamphey, and made part of a cattle-rubbing stone.

Porth Clew Chapel.

The ruins of Porth Clew Chapel stand on the cliffs above Freshwater East Bay, on a field known as Chapel Field (Tithe Schedulers No. 121). Of its history nothing is known. The plan shows a rectangular chamber, 28 feet by 14 feet, with a north doorway 4 feet wide, that still retains the flag-stone in which the pin of the door revolved. The east wall is entire to the gable that to the south has a height of 10 feet; of those to the north and east only their foundations are left. One splayed lights opens to the east, one to the north, and probably two to the south. The masonry base of the altar is in situ, and to its right is a stone bracket, 5 feet from the present level. In the south-east angle is an aumbry 4 feet above the floor. Adjoining the chapel is a weak spring of water which was probable venerated and may have given occasion for the erection of the building.

Baker’s Cottage.

A house probably of the C18, believed to have been a small staging inn called ‘The Venison’. At some time since acquisition by Charles Mathias in 1821 as part of Lamphey Estate, it became a bakery. In 1838 it was in the ownership of Abraham Leach and the tenant was George Macken. The cottage is also believed to have been occupied at one time (c.1875) by a governess.

In c.1890 Joseph Bond installed a Tonks baking oven, the front panel of which is now preserved affixed to a wall at the rear of the house. This was worked in addition to a traditional brick bread oven. The front of a later Princie oven is also displayed.

In c.1925 R E G White converted a little stable adjacent to the house at the South to serve as a new bakery.

Court House.

At the N of Lamphey village, at the turning to the lane which leads to Lamphey Court.

Reputed to date from c.l695. The name derives from the use of the house as a court, the left (parlour) unit having been the courtroom. Subsequently the house has been a farmhouse.

Lamphey Court.

A residence just north of the Palace. The area belonged to the Devereux family, but on the attainder of the Earl of Essex late in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, the lands were purchased by Sir Hugh Owen of Orielton and remained in possession of his descendants until about 1821 when they were sold to Charles Mathias of Llangwarran, who, in 1823, commenced to build the residence known as Lamphey Court.

There had been an older house on the site, and according to the Pembrokeshire Arch Survey, had an outside staircase leading to the upper floor, which was pulled down in 1826. The new Lamphey Court was a large handsome mansion with a fine portico of four Ionic columns. Four of the Mathiases were High Sheriffs – Lewis in 1856, Charles in 1890, Charles Ronald in 1937 and Lewis in 1965. Lewis Mathias was the last of the family at the mansion which he sold in 1978, and now lives in a house in the grounds. The mansion is now a hotel.

Lamphey Park.

A residence just north of Lamphey Court. In 1786 James Thomas was owner-occupier of Lamphey Park, and was still there in 1817 when he was described as gentleman. In 1834 Charles Poyer Callen was the tenant, paying a yearly rent of £50, and Lewis in 1840 states that Lamphey Park, the property of Mrs. Thomas occupies a pleasant situation it is now derelict.

North Down.

In 1840 this was described as a "genteel residence" occupied by the Rev. B. Byers.

Major Jones’s notes are sketchy, but he gives a rough pedigree of the Rowe family Henry Rowe of Lamphey, who died in 1705 had a son Lewis described as "of Northdown. Lewis s eldest son John inherited His second son (b.1699) was the Rev. Henry Rowe Vicar of St. Petrox. John’s son Richard inherited North Down and was Mayor of Pembroke in 1766, 1775, 1781 and l786.

Portclew.

An imposing house in the southern end of the parish on high ground overlooking the cove of Freshwater East and the waters of the Bristol Channel beyond. Lewis in 1840 speaks of "Portclew, a modern mansion, the residence of Thomas Parry Esq., is beautifully situated on an erninence commanding a fine view of the sea." In 1326 Thomas Wettar of Portclew was described as a landowner in the fee of Lamphey, part of the temporalities of the See of St. Davids. In 1560 Edmund Poyer and John Philips are described as of Portclew. By 1595 it was held by Lewis Bishop whose descendants remained there until the death of Lewis Bishop after 1771.

The Bishop family had come to Pembrokeshire in about 1600. The well-known family of West Wales landowners, the Parrys, succeeded the Bishops when John Parry married Margaret, daughter and heiress of Lewis Bishop and came to live at his wife’s home. John became High Sheriff in 1772. Their son William Parry married Ann Kemm, second daughter of Henry Kemm of Northdown, their marriage settlement having been made on October 22 1801. Their daughter, Mary Ann Parry, married at Lamphey on Jan 26 1830 the Rev Francis George Leach son of Abraham and Catherine Leach of Corston. Francis died in 1876 aged 80 and his wife died in 1894 aged 86. By the mid-19th century the Parrys had left Portclew and Portclew House became the home of Col. William Morrison whose descendants were still there in 1904. The district around Portclew had a number of properties which bore the name. In 1786 John Parry was owner-occupier; Sir Hugh Owen owned East Portclew; Sarah Bastin owned Little Portclew and Abraham Leach owned another farm of the same name. In 1894 there were four properties in the area: Portclew; Portclew Burrows; Upper Portclew and Little Porcclew. By 1950 most of these properties remained including Portclew House, occupied by the Uphill family.

Trewent Hall.

Trewent Point.

Home of the Hall family in the 16th and 17th centuries. In 1551 John Hall, alias Howell of Trewent, gent., was summoned to answer Sir John Wogan. An heiress brought it to the Owen family and Sir Hugh Owen was owner in 1786. The Cradock family had connections here. - (Vide George Owen’s list of Pembrokeshire gentry).

Old Chimney

In garden of No. 25 a modern house at the North side of The Ridgeway, at the NE of Lamphey village. The old round chimney stands detached in the garden E of the house.

It is a cylindrical chimney on a tapering base with an oven and fireplace. Local rubble limestone. The cylindrical shaft is approx. 2.5 m high and 1 m diameter. Capping approx. 30 cm below the top and drip courses at the foot of the cylindrical shaft. Nothing remains above ground of the building it served. (It was possibly the lateral chimney on the W side of a cottage of C16/C17 appearance, with its gable to the street, of which an old illustration survives.

A silver coin of Decius (A.D. 251) was found; "in making the railway between Pembroke and Lamphey. Mr Jones, station-master at Lamphey, had it" (Laws, Little England 45.)

Population.

1563 40 households

1670 42 on the Hearth Tax Register

1801 43 families

1894 760

Historical Records.

Extract from the Inventory of the Goods of the Bishop of St David’s 1293 - PRO KR E154/1/48

LANTEFEY (Lamphey, Pembs.)

3 draught animals worth 15s. at 5s. each. 49 oxen worth £14.14.0. at 6s. each. 6 colts, of which 3 are valued at 40s., one at 10s., 1 other at 4s.

There are there in the park - 6 mares, of which 3 are prized (priced) at 40s., and 4 at 40s

2 boars worth 3s.

8 sows worth 16s. at 2s. each.

20 pigs worth 13. 4d.at 8d. each.

19 sows worth 9s. 6d. at 6d. each.

8 piglets worth 2s. 8d. at 4d.each.

20 little piglets worth 3s. 4d. at 2d. each.

4 geese worth 8d.

10 geese worth 10d.

Total £24.12.4.

CORN IN GRANGE

Estimated to be there 40 cribs of wheat worth £7 at 3s. 6d. per crib.

11 cribs "wheat malt" worth 48s. 3d. at 3s. 9d. per crib.

13 cribs of "barley malt" worth 9d. at 2s. 9d. per crib.

9 cribs of "oat malt" worth 40s. 6d. at 4s. 6d. per crib.

19 carcases of pigs of the larder worth 28s. 6d. at 18d. each

19 carcases of oxen worth 38s. at 2s. each.

Total £16.110.

There are there 6 score and 4 acres of wheat worth £24.16 0d at 4s per acre. 21 acres of beans worth £4 4s 0d at 4s per acre. 23 acres of peas worth 46s at 2s per acre. 36 acres of barley worth £7.4.0d. at 4s. per acre. 4 score and 5 1/2 acres of oats worth £10.16.3. at 2s. 6d. per acre. Total, £49.6.3d

8 capons at the Feast of the Nativity of Our Lord, at 11d. per capon.

Pleas and perquisites of court worth 2s. per annum

Extract from the Black Book of St David's 1326 )

Lantefey

Profits

David King, John Kyft, Cadogy Gogh David Swetemon, Thomas Fort Peter de la Lake Ralph le Porter John le Webbe, David Llewelyn David Robert, David Fort and Robert le Hayward, the jurors, present on their oaths, that in the manor there the principal assize of the stone houses within the walls of the gate are worth yearly,

according to their true value, 100s.,

and of the stone buildings without the gate are worth yearly 10s.

They also present that there are three orchards, the fruit of which with the fruit in the curtilage, in apples, cabbages, leeks and other produce, is worth yearly 13s 4d;

also the herbage is worth yearly 6s 8d.

there are also 4 vivaries there and they are worth yearly according to their true value 5s.

And there is a dovecot which is worth yearly 2s

And there are two watermills and one windmill and they are worth yearly according to their true value £ 4

And there is there a park which contains 144 acres, of which 48 acres are wood.

They also present that the underwood of the same wood is worth yearly, without destroying it, 20s

They also present that there can be kept in the said park 60 great beasts, as well as the wild animals.

They also present that the feed of each acre outside the wood is worth yearly to rent 7d

and that each acre of the said pasture within the wood is worth yearly to rent 6d

and the pasture of each beast in the park is worth yearly 8d

And they can mow yearly in the same park, unless they are destroyed 30 loads of rushes and each load is worth 6d

and 40 loads of fern and each load is worth 3d

They also present that there is there one bog for turf and bennet ) and it is worth yearly 10s

They also present that the pleas and perquisites there are worth yearly 20s

There is also there a chapel annexed to the prebend and is of the yearly value of £20.

Lords Demesne

They also present that the Lord has there in demesne, a field called "Kalenge 127 acres and 11 perches of arable land

Also in a field called "Walschton" 21 1/2 acres 1 rood

and in a field which is called "Bontyngesfeld" with the rocks and the greater part of the land formerly Eva's, 32 1/2 acres 1 rood, and 6 perches of arable land:

and in a field which is called "Newepark" 18 acres

and in the field which is called " Psonyslond and " Marchaldislond with a certain part of the land of the said Eva, and with the field on both sides the road alongside the croft of Philip Henry142 acres and 16 perches of land.

From which field there was let to various tenants before this extent was made 27 acres, 1/2 a virgate [rod], and 6 perches of land as appears below;

and in the field below the town against the court 13 acres, and each acre of the said land is worth yearly to let 12d.

They also present that there should be sown upon each acre of coarse [ie. autumn sown] wheat or fallow 3 bushels and of bearded wheat 2 1/2 bushels; and he shall answer for 4 measures of coarse wheat, and of light [ie. spring sown] wheat for 3 measures.

And there should be sown on each acre of beans 6 bushels, and he shall answer to 4 measures,

And there should be sown on each acre of great peas 3 bushels, and he shall answer to 4 measures

and upon an acre of lesser peas or vetches 2 1/2 bushels, and he shall answer for 4 measures;

and upon an acre of barley 6 bushels, and he should answer for 4 measures;

and upon an acre of oats 7 bushels, and he shall answer for 3 measures in every year

Total 426 1/2 acres 1 rood and 15 perches

Total value in money, £ 21 7s 7d

Meadows and Pastures

They also present that the Lord has there 34 acres of meadow and each acre is worth yearly to let 2s 6d

and after mowing they can at that time of year keep 20 great beasts and each pasture is worth 2d

And they present that there is one acre in "Thorris" that cannot be sown, but upon which 12 great beasts

can be kept, and each pasture is worth yearly 6d;

and when it is let by the year it is worth yearly 6s.

Also, the pasture on the fallows can feed 300 sheep in winter and 200 through the summer, and thus pasture for each is worth 2d.

Also on the pasture of Porthllu 300 sheep can be kept, and the pasture is worth to let 20s.

Free Tenants

They also present that Wyot de Lawrenny holds by deed from the Lord in capite half a carucate of land and pays yearly in equal portions at Easter and Michaelmas 2s and the Lord has wardship and relief when it occurs.

Item, the heirs of Richard de Stakepol hold one carucate of land adjoining the court of Lantefey for which they do suit of Court three times at Lawhaden.

Item William Harald holds 2 carucates of land at Woveran [Warren] and pays in every third year on the Kalends of May 2s or 2 sheep at the option of the Lord and does suit of Court at Lawhaden from 15 days to 15 days.

Sanctuary

They also present that Thomas Walter de Porthllu holds one bovate of land from the Sanctuary and

pays yearly at Easter and Michaelmas 6s

Item, Isaute le Proute holds one bovate of land, and pays yearly at the aforesaid times 6s.

Also David Mayo holds one plot with the curtilage and one bovate of land and pays yearly at the same times 6s 8d.

Item Richard Swetemon holds a plot and curtilage with a bovate of land, and pays yearly at the same times 6s 8d.

Item, John Russell holds one plot and a curtilage, with 2 bovates and 1 1/2 acres of land ,

and pays yearly at the same times 17d

Item, David Fort holds 1 plot and curtilage with 8 acres of land, and pays yearly at the same times 4s 8d

Item, Thomas Gwyn holds 4 acres of land and pays yearly at the same times 2s

Item Johanna Page holds 1/2 bovate of land, and pays yearly at the same times 3s

Item John Cole holds 1 plot and curtilage with 1/2 bovate of land and pays yearly at the same times 3s 8d

Item Wyot de Laurenny holds 1 plot and curtilage with a bovate of land and pays yearly at the same times 6s 8d.

Item Walter Thomas holds 6 acres of land and pays yearly at the same times 3s

Item Robert Swetemon holds 6 acres of land and pays yearly at the same times 3s

Item Elena Row holds 1/2 bovate of land, and pays yearly at the same times 3s

Item John le Proute holds 1/2 a bovate of land and pays yearly at the same times 3s.

Item Philip Henry holds 1 plot and curtilage with 8 acres of land, and pays yearly at the same times 7s 8d

Item Master Gregory the Chaplain holds 2 acres of land and pays yearly at the same times 12d

Item David Fenil holds 1 plot and a curtilage, and pays yearly at the same times 12d

Item Roys Swynnog holds 1 curtilage, and pays yearly at the same time 4d

Item they present that there is a certain part of the Sanctuary in the Lord's hands, and it is entered above in the demesne, but they cannot say how many acres.

Services.

And all the aforesaid give for a heriot the best beast and for a mortuary the second best or the bettermost upper garment, which they usually use, if there is no beast.

And they do suit of court by summons of one night at the will of the Lord, and they have a common fine of x.s.

And after the death of any of them, his land is seized into the Lord's hand.

And it was formerly the custom that the land should be re-granted to the widow of the deceased as of the nearest [to the deceased in blood]; and this by favour of the spiritual Lord.

But if he had no widow, his heir was accustomed to be preferred by favour as above

And if the widow, after taking the land as above, married, she lost the land, which should then be re-granted to the heir as above stated.

Farmers at Porthellan.

They also present that Johanna Kyft holds one bovate and pays yearly at Easter and Michaelmas 21d

Item Johanna Page holds a bovate of land and pays yearly at the same times 21d

Item, John Wallens holds 2 acres without services and one bovate of land with services,

and pays yearly at the same times 2s 5d

Item Peter de la Lake holds one and a half bovates and four acres of land without services and one bovate with services,

and pays yearly at the same times 9s 1d

Item Henry Kyft holds one bovate with services and one bovate without services and pays yearly at the same times 5s 9d

Item David Kyng holds one and a half bovates without services and pays yearly at the same times 9s 9d

Item Alice, widow of David Iowan holds one bovate of land with services, and pays yearly at the same times 2s 5d

Item, John le Proute holds half a bovate of land without services and a bovate with services, and pays yearly at the same times 3s 9d

Item, Elena Eynon holds 1 acre of land without services and one plot and a curtilage with services, and pays yearly at the same times 16d

Item David Iewan holds 4 acres without services and 1 bovate of land with services and pays yearly at the same times 4s

Item John Cras holds one and a half bovates of land without services and one bovate with services, and pays yearly at the same times 9s 9d

Item, Isabella Huet holds 1 bovate of land with services and pays yearly at the same times 21d

Item Res Wiston holds 1 acre of land with services, and pays yearly at the same times 7d

Item Thomas Fort holds 1 acre of land without services and one bovate of land with services and pays yearly at the same times 2s 1d

Item Thomas Whiting holds 6 acres of land without services and 1 bovate of land with services and pays yearly at the same times 3s 9d

Item, David Robert holds 2 acres without services and i bovate of land with services, and pays yearly at the same times 2s 7d

Item, David Fort holds 1 bovate of land without services and one bovate of land with services, and pays yearly at the same times 5s 9d

Farmers of Lantefey.

Item, they present that John Merlyng holds one plot and 1 curtilage with one bovate of land with services,

and pays yearly at Easter and Michaelmas 2s

Item John Stedemonholds 1 bovate of land and pays yearly at the same times 14d

Item Richard Page holds 1 bovate and pays yearly at the same times 12d

Item Maiota la White holds 1 plot and curtilage with 1 bovate of land and pays yearly at the same times 12d

Item William Swetemon holds 1 bovate and 4 acres of land without services and 1 bovate of land with services, and holds by deed

and pays yearly at the same times 5s 10d

Item Amabella la Ferour holds three acres without services, and 1 bovate of land by deed with services, and pays yearly at the same times 2s 6d

Item Sara la White holds 1 bovate of land without services and 1 bovate of land with services and pays yearly at the same times 7s 6d.

Item David Swetemon holds 1 plot and 1 curtilage with 1 bovate of land with services and pays yearly at the same times 12d

Item Johanna, the widow of Philip Henry holds a plot and curtilage with 1 bovate of land with services, and pays yearly at the same times 12d

Item David Moris holds 1 plot and 1 curtilage, with 1 bovate of land with services and pays yearly at the same times 12d

Item Thomas Res holds 1 plot and curtilage, with 1 bovate of land with services, and pays yearly at the same times 18d

Item David Russell holds 1 plot and curtilage with 1/2 bovate of land with services and pays yearly at the same times 6d

Item Thomas Page holds 1 1/2 acres of land without services and pays yearly at the same time 18d

Item Amabilla Swetemon holds 1 plot and curtilage with 1 bovate of land, and pays yearly at the same time 13d

Item John Miller holds 1 plot with a bovate of land, and pays yearly at the same times 12d

Item Cadogy Gouth holds 1 croft 1 plot, and curtilage, with one bovate of land with services, and pays yearly at the same times 4s

Services.

And all the aforesaid Farmers at Lantefey and Porthllu give for a heriot [death duty] their best horse or their best beast

and for a mortuary their second best beast or their best outer garment which they usually use if they have no beast;

and for leyrwyt, () if the woman is married out of the parish 2s; and if she is married within, they give nothing.

And they ought to plough twice; the Lord finding food and the value of each service is 1d.

And they ought to harrow twice, the Lord finding food and the value of this service is a 1/2d (halfpenny)

And they ought to hoe half a day without food but if the Lord wants them for the whole day the Lord shall find food; the value of this service is a 1/2d (halfpenny)

And they ought to gather all the Lords hay in the meadow finding their own food, and also carry it on the Lords finding food and the value of this service is 1d

And they ought to reap for three days, the Lord finding food, and the value of this service is 1d

Item they ought to carry the corn of the Lord for one day and the value of this service is 1d

Item they ought to carry the material for the houses and mills at their own cost from Loydarth, Lawhaden, Tenby Pembroke Carrew, and Slebeech to Llantefey, and the value of this joint service is, according to its, true value, 6s 8d.

And there are 26 of the aforesaid services, and the value of each is 3d

Item, they ought to carry coal for making lime as often as necessary,

Item they ought to carry tiles for the houses in the manor whenever necessary.

Item they ought to keep in repair the mill-pond at their own cost

Item, they ought to make mud walls for the water mill, the Lord finding food

Item, they ought to carry mill stones, and thatch the mill with the Lord's straw at their own cost.

Item, they pay a toll on buying and selling, that is to say, on horses, oxen, and all other beasts whatever, and on sheep.

And they ought to carry the corn for the bread to the place where it is baked on the demesnes at Lawhaden and Burton, and also for the Lord's brewing from the granary as often as necessary, the Lord finding food

And they sit in the Hall at the tablecloth in the area

And they give collection of sheep in every third year, namely, when there are 20 or more a sheep,

and when there are not 20 they give nothing.

And if any one is convicted or arrested for felony he ought to be delivered to the said tenants, and they ought to keep him and take him to Lawhaden, at their risk and at their own cost, and there give judgement on the case.

And they ought to load the waggons and carts of the Lord going for wine to Tenby, Pembroke and Carrew and convey the same safe to the Lord's cellar at their own cost in addition to the stallage

And they do suit of Court on summons of one night at the will of the Lord, and there is a common fine of 10s

And they ought to follow the army in a general war for the defence of the land of the Lord Bishop.

And they present that all the tenants of Porthllu do the same services except the corn services

Item, they present that beasts and other goods sold when there are merchants at Pembroke and Tenby, but nowhere else in the Bishoprick, should not pay toll to any Lord but the Bishop wherever these sales were made. And they ought to carry oats coming from the manors of the Lord at Pebidawke to Lantefey or Borton for the prebends, the Lord finding food.

LANTEFREY (Larnphey, Pembs.)

Item, there is there a manor whereof the messuage is worth with garden and Curtilage, 3s. 4d. per annum. And there is there a dovecot worth 6d. 2 carucates of land worth 100s per annum, at 40s. (sic) per carucate: a meadow worth 3s. 4d.: a park whose pannage when it arises, with pasture, is worth 10s per annum. There is there one decayed mill which was farmed of old, worth 11s. per annum, paid at the Feast of St Michael: one meadow worth 7s. per annum.

Rent of assize of certain tenants £4.4.2 per annum, paid at the Feasts of St.Michael, the Nativity of Our Lord, the Annunciation of the BVM, and St. John.

Pleas and perquisites of court, worth 6s.

1402 Feb 14

To the venerable etc. Henry, by the grace of God bishop of Norwich, Guy etc., greeting………. Dated in our manor of Lantefey, 14 February, 1401-02, etc.

1402

Also on 7 March, in the year of the Lord above-said the bishop in his manor of Lantefey admitted

Sir John Vachan, chaplain, to the parish church of Llancoedmaltr, of his diocese

1402 July 17 Lantefey

Also on the 17th day of the same month in the place aforesaid. The bishop granted to Sir William Rolleston, rector of the parish church of Loudchurch, of his diocese, a licence of non-residence for one year continuously from the date of these presents.

1402 Lantfey

Also on 3 September, in the year and place abovesaid, the bishop admitted Sir John Geffrey, chaplain, to the parish church of Loudechurch vacant by the free resignation of Sir William Cade of Rolleston.

1477 4 February

Robertus etc. bishop, lord of Pebidiawke and Llawhaden, Hugh ap Owen chanter of the cathedral church of St. David’s, and the chapter of the same place, to all to whom etc. greeting. Know ye that we of our unanimous assent and consent have given and by this our present writing confirmed to our beloved in Christ Henry Matteston the office of parker or keeper of the park of Lamphey Dated in our Chapter House, 4 February, 1476-77, 16 Edward IV.

1486 30 July

On 30 July 1486 at Lamphey a letter, the tenour of which follows, was exhibited to H. bishop of St. Davids.

To the venerable father in Christ etc. the bishop St David’s or his vicar general in spiritualities.

Julian by the mercy of the Lord Bishop of Ostia sendeth greeting and sincere charity in the Lord. A petition offered unto us on behalf of Walter ap John of Stacorse layman of your diocese contained that by the instigation of the devil he lately killed one Roger Walter, priest of the said place, his Spiritual father who had baptized one of his sons, on which account he falls under the sentence of excommunication pronounced in general terms against such as do these things, upon which things he has caused supplication to be humbly made, setting forth the same, for a due remedy to be mercifully provided for him by the apostolic see. We therefore by authority of the Lord Pope the care of whose penitentiary we bear and by his special mandate upon this made to us by the oracle of the living voice commit to your prudence that if this is so when he shall have gone by all the larger churches of that place where so great a crime was perpetrated, naked and unshod with only his breeches on, bearing a rod in his hand, and a yoke about his neck if he can with safety and caused himself to be beaten before the doors of the churches aforesaid and with the priests of the same singing a penitential psalm, when the multitude of the people in these is greatest, publicly confessing his sin, and when he shall have adequately satisfied, if he have not already done so, the church which the murdered priest served, and when he and his heirs have been deprived for ever of any fee or right of patronage he hold of the church (and lest the memory of the punishment be too short let his children on this account be deemed incapable of holding an ecclesiastical benefice unless with them there be a merciful dispensation upon this by the apostolic see), you shall absolve this layman from the said sentence and such guilt and excess of priesticide in the accustomed form of the church and enjoin on him therefore by the authority aforesaid, such penance as may be to him for salvation and to others for terror. Dated at Rome at St. Peter under the seal of the office of the penitentiary 21 April, 4 Innocent VIII.

1487 September 13

Hugh etc. to Masters David Wogan canon of our cathedral church of St. David’s, and Richard Gely canon of our college of Abergwilly, greeting etc. To have cognizance, to proceed, to decree, and to decide finally, in a matrimonial cause which one David Tailour of the parish of St. Mary, Pembroke, of our diocese intends to move before us against Joneta Raymond of the said parish and to determine the cause itself by a due and canonical end, with the things arising out of, depending on, incidental to and connected with it, to you in whose prudence and industry we have full confidence in the Lord, jointly and severally, we commit our functions with the power of every canonical coercion whatsoever, commanding that of the whole process to be had before you in this behalf, when the cause is determined, you, or one of you, certify us distinctly and openly by letters patent sealed with an authentic seal. Dated in Lamphey manor 13 September, 1487 etc.

1487

To all and singular etc. Hugh etc.

Whereas we etc., to whom sole and entire the right of conferring the grammar schools in our city and diocese of St. David’s as well of right as of custom is well known to pertain, have appointed our beloved in Christ Richard Smyth master in arts, chaplain in our church of the Blessed Mary, Haverford, of our diocese, to be master of the grammar schools in the said Haverford and to rule the same grammar schools, and to inform unlearned youths in grammar and the other liberal sciences, by the tenour of these presents, therefore, we inhibit and admonish, once, twice, and thrice, that no one put under or subject to us by diocesan right dare contrary to this our appointment to rule such schools in the said town of Haverford and any place within a circumference of seven miles of the same town without obtaining the licence of the aforesaid master, or in any wise whatsoever presume to attempt anything about the premises to the prejudice of the aforesaid Master Richard, under pain of contempt and the greater excommunication to be pronounced against contemners and violators of our present appointment. In witness whereof etc. Dated in our manor of Lamphey 8 May in the year etc.

1489 5 January

On 5 January in the year above, at Lamphey by the reverend father aforesaid, Sir John Dier chaplain, was admitted to the vacant church of Manorbier.

1490 21 October

On 21 October he collated to Sir John Makeram chaplain, the vicarage of Overam and instituted him in the same then vacant by the resignation of Sir John Coke last vicar there and in his collation.

1535 the vicar at Lamphey is recorded as having an annual income of £5 8s - quite low by the standards of the day.

1546 in an exchange of property forced upon Bishop Barlow, he alienated Lamphey, the richest of his manors, and one of his most delightful houses. Technically, it was handed over to the Crown, but it was soon transferred to the powerful magnate, Richard Devereau. In part, greed and local pressure made it expedient for Barlow to surrender such a valuable estate; in part, it was a reflection that, already, Tudor bishops were much impoverished in comparison with their medieval predecessors and could not live on the same lavish scale. The surrender of Lamphey was also a hint of the policy pursued rigorously in the later sixteenth century, the policy of scaling down the wealth of the episcopate. Barlow’s recompense was sadly inadequate: he received the advowson of the rectory and vicarage of Carew.

1576 Richard Devereux Earl of Essex and holder of Lamphey Palace from the King died in Ireland. His son Robert age nine succeeded and his widow Countess Lettice, then married the Earl of Leicester and his daughter Dorothy (some say Penelope) married Sir Thomas Perrott son of Sir John Perrott.

George Devereux brother of Richard then lived at Lamphey and the nephew Robert Earl of Essex lived there with him until he was twenty two. Robert Earl of Essex became a favourite of Elizabeth I and she bestowed Carew Castle on him but he later fell in disgrace and was beheaded in 1601 on Tower Hill.

With Robert Earl of Essex lived and fought and died Sir Gilly Meyrick of Gellyswick, Milford Haven son of Dr Rowland Meyrick, Bishop of Bangor, and Katherine daughter of Owen Barrett of Gellywick.

Late 1500’s Rice Philip Scarfe of Lamphey is recorded as being one of the corn merchants who was buying up the corn for export in a time of shortage.

1595 reputed to be still deer in the Deer park which was 144 acres in extent. It lay on the east side of the palace and was surrounded by a high limestone wall which the tenants of the manor had to keep in repair.

1610 February Rice Philip Scarfe of Lamphey who was originally from Carmarthenshire and who held a 21 year lease of the manor of Lamphey from Lettice Countess of Leicester was accused of various crimes by a group which included members of the Meyricks, Cluny, Adams and Wogan families. This matter ended up in the Star Chamber and also involved the various families organizing a raid on Lamphey palace in which they seized goods and over 400 sheep.

1613 Robert Devereaux (1591-1646) 3rd Earl of Essex lived for a brief time in 1613 at Lamphey. The grandson of Robert Devereux Earl of Essex had some property restored by James I. He seems to have lived at Lamphey and in 1620 he, John Meyrick of Fleet at Monkton near Pembroke and Rowland Laugharne of St Brides fought in Holland.

1642 – at the outbreak of the Civil war the lease of the manor of Lamphey was held by Major John Gunter who was serving with the Parliamentary Army. It was raided by Captain Crowe of the Royalist side who took a large number of cattle.

1725 Nov 27. Carew.

David Thomas to Adam Ottley Esq. At Pitchford Near Salop.

Your former goodness in befriending my collation to the vicarage of Carew and Lanphey upon Mr. N. Morgan’s recommendation, for which I return most hearty thanks, induces me to assume this liberty of informing you of the hardship I labour under, my benefice by the two parishes not exceeding £30 per annum a very short and small allowance for discharging of two separate areas, that of Lanphey being a vicarage endowed only with the small tithes of the parish. I presume you are party sensible that the small tithes of Lanphey Court have been hitherto illegally detained from me (which I compute to amount to two-thirds of my due there, the Bounty money excepted)……… (Ottley MS. 509.)

1766 August 8. Pulchrohen.

[Rev.] Geo[Rge] Holcombe To Robert Lowth, Bishop Of St. Davids.

Since I wrote to Mr. Barsen about Landphey rectory I have been informed that its real value may be set down frorn £25 to £30 per annum. The reason why its value is not more considerable is owing to the alienation of the best tenements in it from the see in Queen Elizabeth’s reign.

Postscript: Sir William Owen gathers the tithe corn of the parish with his own, which make it difficult to ascertain the real value, but I think it cannot exceed £30 per annum. - Lucas MS. 2856.

(1834 Topographical Dictionary of Wales.)

Lamphey parish, in the hundred of Castlemartin, on the road to Tenby, containing 436 inhabitants. This places which takes its name from the dedication of its church to St. Faith, was among the first of those in South Wales in which the early Normans obtained a settlement. According to Buck, as quoted by Grose, it was the head of a lordship marcher; and anciently contained one of the princely residences of the bishops of St. David’s, of which there are considerable remains. At what period it first became the property of the archiepiscopal and subsequently Episcopal church of St. Davids is not precisely known; but a deed dated at Lamphey, in the middle of the thirteenth century, by Bishop Carew, is still extant; and, according to Giraldus Cambrensis, it appears to have been an episcopal residence in the time of Arnulph de Montgomery, who possessed himself of this part of the principality in the reign of Henry I. At least a great part of the Episcopal palace (even the whole of it according to some writers) was built by Bishop Gower, in 1335: the various styles of architecture which characterize its ruins show plainly that it was the work of successive periods, and that it did not attain the splendour for which it was remarkable, but by the accumulated additions and improvements of its successive proprietors, of whom Bishop Gower probably built the great hall and the square tower.

This portion of the see was of St David’s was alienated to the crown by Bishop Barlow in the reign of Henry VIII by whom Lamphey was granted to Devereux Viscount Hereford father of the unfortunate Earl of Essex who passed the greater part of his youth in this palace. After the attainder of the earl, in the reigns of Elizabeth this estate was purchased by Sir Hugh Owen, of Orielton, by those descendant, Sir John Owen, Bart., it was sold to its present proprietor, Charles Matthias, Esq., who has erected an elegant modern mansion, called Lamphey Court, with noble portico of four Ionic columns, near the ruins of the ancient palace.

Besides this seat, the parish contains several genteel residences, occupied by opulent families: Portclew, a modern mansion, the residence of Thomas Parry, Esq., is beautifully situated on an eminence commanding a fine view of the sea, and having at its base some fine smooth and firm sands, well adapted for sea-bathing, and affording a delightful walk. Lamphey Park, the property of Mrs. Thomas, also occupies a pleasant situation: the grounds contain some pleasing scenery and are tastefully disposed. North Down, the property of Colonel Kemm, is a genteel residence, now in the occupation of the Rev. B. Byers.

Indications of coal have been observed in this parish, from which it is concluded that strata of this fossil here extends in a direction from northwest to south-west, but no attempt has hitherto been made toe work it: limestone is found in great abundance and of excellent quality, and a considerable quantity is quarried for building purposes, and also burnt into lime.

All the land in that part of the parish which was alienated from the see in the reign of Henry VIII and which constitutes a large portion of it, including the park, which alone contains many hundred acres of fine land, is tithe-free, and the great tithes of the other part, which are leased by the bishop to the lord of the manor, scarcely produce £50 per annum. The living is a discharged vicarage, in the archdeaconry and diocese of St. Davids, rated in the king’s books at £5 8s 11d, endowed with £600 royal bounty, and in the patronage of the Bishop of St. David’s. The church, dedicated to St. Faith, was thoroughly repaired in 1826, partly by subscription, and partly by an additional church rate, aided by a grant of £100 from the Incorporated Society for promoting the erection and enlargement of churches and chapels, by which two hundred additional sittings have been obtained, of which, in consideration of the grant from the Society, one hundred and thirty-five are to be for ever free and unappropriated.

A National school has been established, for which a commodious school-room, with a neat cottage for the residence of the master and mistress was erected in 1828 by subscription aided by a grant of £70 from the parent society with which the school has been incorporated. The grounds for the schoolroom and garden was granted rent free on lease for 60 years by Charles Matthias Esq lord of the manor who contributed £50 towards defraying the expense of the building and subscribes £10 per annum for the support of the institution. About 100 children of both sexes are gratuitously instructed in this establishment, which is well conducted, and liberally supported by subscription.

The remains of the ancient palace, which amply display its former splendour, consist of the great hall, seventy-six feet in length and twenty in width, the walls of which are crowned by an elegant open parapet of delicate tracery; another apartment, sixty feet long and twenty six wide; the chancel of the chapel, of which the east window, still entire, is a beautiful composition, enriched with elegant tracery; the grand entrance on the south, and the square tower above-noticed, now enclosed within the gardens of the newly erected mansion, in which it forms an interesting object. The greatest attention is paid to the preservation of these elegant remains, and every precaution has been taken by the proprietor of Lamphey Court to arrest the decay to which this venerable pile was rapidly falling from previous neglect. The average annual expenditure for the maintenance of the poor is £120. I3.

1844-9 August the Cricket match between Lamphey and Pembroke brought together a large concourse of the gentry of the neighbourhood.

1943 American Troops of the 110 US Infantry Regiment mainly from Pennsylvania were stationed at Lamphey.

In the Korean War Lt John Davey of Lamphey won the MC.

Education.

(Acc/to the report on the State of Education in Wales 1847.)

On the 21st of December I visited the above school. It is held in the National school-room at Lamphey. It was built by means of a grant from the National Society of £70, and £50. given by Charles Matthias, Esq., of Lamphey Court, the deficiency being made up by the Vicar. It was built on a piece of ground granted by the former gentleman in exchange for another plot belonging to the parish, and was secured by lease in trust for the term of sixty years, seventeen of which only have expired. The school-room was commodious and well supplied with apparatus. The master seemed a very intelligent man. The books were well kept. There was also a visitor, book, in which I noticed testimonials of high approbation from several gentlemen, and amongst others from the Rev. John Allen, Her Majesty’s Inspector. The number present at the time of my visit was comparatively small on account of the badness of the weather. I heard the first class read the fifth chapter of the book of the Prophet Daniel. The reading upon the whole was remarkably good, and the answers given to my questions were quick and ready. They were able to give me a correct account of the history of Daniel, Shadrach, Meshech, and Abednego. Knew by what names they were called by King Belshazzar. I had also a very good account of the history of Moses and the captivity of the children of Israel, as well as the history of Joshua. Two of the boys, about the age of fourteen, were at the time of my visit engaged in making maps of the HolyLand. These maps were (for boys of their age) remarkably well done. I examined the copy-books of the pupils and found those of the senior classes very well written and those of the juniors proportionally so.

The questions in mental arithmetic were very well answered and some few in geography. This and the Sunday-school which is held in the same place are the only schools in the parish of Lamphey. Wages are about 8s. per week on the average.

The second class read the sixth chapter of the book of Daniel; most of them read very well, and could answer a few questions upon what they had been reading. The third was reading the miracles of our Saviour, and the fourth was in monosyllables and letters.

Land Tax 1791.

PARISH AND PROPERTY     SURNAME FORENAMES

Lamphey                                     Edwards Charles (tenant)

Lamphey                                     Hicks Rev James (owner)

Lamphey John David (tenant)

Lamphey Jones John (tenant)

Lamphey Leach Abraham (owner)

Lamphey Morgans Thomas (tenant)

Lamphey Oriel Thomas (owner)

Lamphey Owen Sir Hugh (owner)

Lamphey Rowe Richard (tenant)

Lamphey Williams John (tenant)

Lamphey Williams John (tenant)

Lamphey Bishops land Owen Sir Hugh (owner)

Lamphey Callands Thomas Rees (tenant)

Lamphey Cleggers Owen Sir Hugh (owner)

Lamphey Deer Park Owen Sir Hugh (owner)

Lamphey East Callands Owen Sir Hugh (owner)

Lamphey East Portclew Powell Elizabeth (tenant)

Lamphey East.Portclew Owen Sir Hugh (owner)

Lamphey Farm Owen Sir Hugh (owner)

Lamphey Honey Hill Jones Daniel (tenant

Lamphey Honey Hill Owen Sir Hugh (owner

Lamphey Howells land Llewhellin Rees (owner)

Lamphey Howells land Williams John (tenant)

Lamphey Lake Gwyther Thomas (tenant

Lamphey Lake Hall James (owner)

Lamphey Lake Jones John (tenant)

Lamphey Lake Leach Abraham (owner)

Lamphey Lake Owen Sir Hugh (owner)

Lamphey Lake Phillips John (owner)

Lamphey Lake Thomas Margarett (tenant)

Lamphey Lords meadow Owen Sir Hugh (owner)

Lamphey Loves Hill Hicks Rev James (owner)

Lamphey Loves Hill Thomas Richard (tenant)

Lamphey Little Portclew Boston Sarah (owner)

Lamphey Little Portclew Dawkins Thomas (tenant)

Lamphey Little Portclew Jones John (tenant)

Lamphey Little Portclew Leach Abraham (owner)

Lamphey Mathias land Llewhellin Rees (owner)

Lamphey Mathias land Williams John (tenant)

Lamphey Middle Callands Owen Sir Hugh (owner)

Lamphey Mill Owen Sir Hugh (owner)

Lamphey Mill Thomas Henry (tenant)

Lamphey North Down West Rowe Richard (owner)

Lamphey Old Park Owen Sir Hugh (owner)

Lamphey Old Park Tennant John (tenant)

Lamphey Park Gwyther Thomas (tenant)

Lamphey Park Hicks Rev James (owner)

Lamphey Park Thomas James (owner)

Lamphey Portclew Llewhellin Rees (owner)

Lamphey Portclew Parry John (owner)

Lamphey Portclew Williams John (tenant)

Lamphey Vickers Meadow Gwyther Thomas (tenant)

Lamphey Vickers Meadow Hicks Rev James (owner)

Lamphey West Callands Owen Sir Hugh (owner)

Lamphey West Hill Alms James (tenant)

Lamphey West Hill Owen Sir Hugh (owner)

Lamphey Windsor Owen Rev Arthur (owner)

Lamphey Windsor Phillips John (tenant)

Lamphey lands Owen Rev Arthur (owner)

Lamphey lands Skone John (tenant)

Lamphey small tythes Hicks Rev James (owner)

Lamphey the Calland Hood Benjamin (tenant)

Lamphey the Calland Owen Sir Hugh (owner)

Lamphey the Cleggers Rowe Richard (tenant)

Lamphey the Tarrs Powel Abraham (tenant)

Lamphey the Tarrs Rice Henry (owner)

Hearth Tax 1670 (p = pauper )

Ansley Nicholas 1670 Llamphey p

Bowen David 1670 Llamphey p

Butler Walter 1670 Llamphey h2

Cod John 1670 Llamphey p

David Walter 1670 Llamphey p

Davis Henry 1670 Llamphey p

Dawkins John 1670 Llamphey p

Fox John 1670 Llamphey p

Furlong Francis 1670 Llamphey p

Gibbon William 1670 Llamphey h3

Gwither George 1670 Llamphey p

Hellier John 1670 Llamphey h3

Hilling Mathew 1670 Llamphey h1

Hitchins Thomas 1670 Llamphey h1

Hooper Lawrence 1670 Llamphey p

Howell Francis 1670 Llamphey h2

Howell William 1670 Llamphey h1

Howell Francis 1670 Llamphey p

Llewhelin Henry 1670 Llamphey h2

Machan Devereux 1670 Llamphey p

Marchant Thomas 1670 Llamphey h2

Marchant John 1670 Llamphey p

Marchant George 1670 Llamphey h2

Mathew William 1670 Llamphey h1

Meare Hugh 1670 Llamphey h1

Nevell John 1670 Llamphey p

North Henry 1670 Llamphey p

Oriell Henry 1670 Llamphey h1

Penet Jenet 1670 Llamphey p

Perrot Anne 1670 Llamphey p

Phillip Lewis 1670 Llamphey h1

Poyer John 1670 Llamphey h5

Poyer John 1670 Llamphey h2

Rice George 1670 Llamphey h1

Skinner George 1670 Llamphey p

Thomas Elizabeth 1670 Llamphey p

Venant Robert 1670 Llamphey h1

Warlowe Richard 1670 Llamphey h1

Watkins John 1670 Llamphey h1

Whellin Evan 1670 Llamphey h1

William Evan 1670 Llamphey p

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Landshipping             020112

A quiet backwater village near the confluence of the two Cleddau rivers. Once a great anthracite mining district, the community was shattered by the Garden Pit Disaster of 1844 when over 40 villagers were lost when the gallery under the river collapsed. There were two quays here. Landshipping Quay proper was the local coal exporting point, while the little quay on the shore of the Eastern Cleddau was used by the ferry from the Picton side.

(Acc/to The Pembrokeshire Coast National Park by Dillwyn Miles.)

Athough the origin of the name "long shippen" indicates an agricultural environment (shippen means cow house), Landshipping was a centre of the Daugleddau coalfield until the tide broke into the Garden Pit with the loss of over 40 lives in 1844. A ruined house that once knew spendour and derelict quays are all that remain.

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Lawrenny         017069

[Originally notes written for Mr. Jones. Churchwarden of Lawrenny Church who always gave me such a warm welcome when I preached there.]

(Acc/to South Pembrokeshire Place Names – P. Valentine Harris.)

Lawrenny. Cr.1190. Gir. Camb. Leurenni, -eni. 1603, Lawrenny. The first syllable is W. Llawr, ‘floor, bottom.’

Lawrenny. An attractive old village well off the beaten track with some pleasant cottages and a church with a tall tower. The road along the Cresswell River shore has windblown oak trees, and out on the point Lawenny Quay, once an important coal exporting station, is now a popular yacht station and marina. Some of the holiday developments are not particularly attractive. The remains of Lawrenny Hall were pulled down just after WW2 but there are marvelous views from what would once have been a terraced garden over the Cleddeau. There is a footpath from the Yacht Station up through the woods and over past the old Hall site down to the Church.

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

From the earliest date it was appendant to the manor of Lawrenny. In 1594 being then in hands of the Wogans of Wiston. - (Owen’s Pem.)

This church was in 1291 assessed for tenths to the King at £8, the tax payable being 16s. - (Taxatio.)

Laurenny Rectoria—Ecclesia ibidem ex presentacione Johannis Wogan armigeri unde Johannis Wogan est sector habens ibidem mansionem et glebam Et valent fructus bujus beneficii per annum xiiji vj viijd. Inde sol’ in visit acion e o r dinar I a et tercio an rto 2 ij d. Et in visitacione archidiaconi pro sinodalibus et procuracioni-busannuatimvs. Ixd. Et remanetclare £12 19s. 11d. Inde decima 26s. - (Valor Eccl.)

Under the heading "Livings Discharged":- Lawrenny R. (St. Caredog). Ordinario quolibet tertio anno, 1s. Archidiac. Quolibet anno, John Wogan, Esq., 1535; Lewis Barlow, Esq., 1723; Hugh Barlow, Esq., 1751; Elizabeth Barlow, widow, 1780. yearly value, £45 King’s Books, £13. -  (Bacon’s Liber Regis.)

Lawrenny church was restored in 1885. - (Arch. Camb., Ser. V., Vol. V., p. 137.)

On 9 June, 1896, a faculty was granted for the erection of a new porch to Lawrenny Church.

(Acc/to the Topographical Dictionary of Wales.)

Lawrenny, a parish in the hundred of Narberth, county of Pembroke, 5 miles NNE from Pembroke containing 422 inhabitants. This parish is situated on a branch of Milford Haven over which it has a ferry and comprises a large portion of enclosed and well cultivated land. The surrounding scenery is pleasingly diversified and in some parts enriched with noble plantations. Lawrenny Hall the ancient seat of the late Hugh Barlow Esq, who represented Pembroke and its contributory boroughs in eight successive parliaments and now a ruin, is beautifully situated on a point of land between Milford haven on the west and a wide creek branching from it to the north east towards Creswell bay, the demesne, which is so-extensive with the parish is embellished with a rich variety of scenery presenting an agreeable contrast of wood and water; and the luxuriant groves which shaded the ancient mansion are still seen in every point of view embosoming the venerable church which formed and interesting and highly picturesque object in the views from the hall. This fine estate is entailed in the family of Lort Philipps of Haverfordwest Esq. Limestone both for building and to be burned for manure abounds in this parish; and the quarrying and burning of it affords employment to a portion of the inhabitants a great number of whom are also engaged during the winter season in dredging for oysters which are found here in great abundance and conveyed principally to the London market, in boats from Chatham and Rochester, for the loading of which the coast affords every facility. The living is a discharged rectory in the archdeaconry and diocese of St David’s rated in the king’s books at £13 and in the patronage of Mrs. Barlow. The church dedicated to St Caradoc, is a venerable cruciform structure in the early style of English architecture with an elegant square embattled tower which is seen to great advantage from almost every side rising above the rich foliage by which the body is concealed. In a sepulchral chapel belonging to the family of Barlow is a splendid monument to the memory of the late Hugh Barlow Esq. consisting of an altar tomb of variegated marble, on which is placed an elegant sarcophagus of white marble, bearing the family arms of Barlow and Crespigny; this monument was erected by his widow, who was of the latter family and who also placed in the chapel two superb vases of alabaster, four ft in height, supported on pedestals of white marble. There is a place of worship for Wesley Methodists.

This is one of the four parishes to which Dr Jones bequeathed in 1698 considerable property for the relief of decayed housekeepers and the apprenticing of children with a discretionary power to his executer and brother, the Rev. William Jones, to whose memory a handsome mural tablet has been erected in the church of this place to add other parishes; the portion assigned to Lawrenny from the produce of this charity is about £30 per annum, appropriated pursuant to the directions of the testator. The poor are supported by an average annual expenditure of £171 2s.

Church St Caradog tall tower (grade A listed building).

(Acc/to The Old Parish Churches of South West Wales – Mike Salter 1994.)

The chancel arch looks Norman but the chancel with several original openings is late 13c and the transepts and nave doorways are also of that period. The squint between the north transept and the chancel has a recess containing the effigy of a cross-legged knight of c1300. There is a double bellcote over the chancel arch but a west tower was added in the 16c. The porch and the vestry are Victorian.

Rectors.

1312 John de Hotham

1408 Robert Daldene

1408 May25 John Marler

1487 David Mant

1493 June 27 Hugh Lloyd

1536 Thomas Wogan

1554 Oct11 John Saunders

1620 Sept 26 William Dolbyn

1623 Mar 6 Oliver Thomas

1661 Jan 16 John Davids

1663 May 21 William Jones MA

1688 July 11 Robert Lloyd

1712 Apr 7 William Bowen

1722 Oct 30 Rowland Gwyn

1731 Hugh Thomas

1733 Jan 6 George Stokes MA

1751 Dec 9 John Bowling MA

1757 Sep 19 Thomas Ayleway

1763 Dec 16 John Voyle

1768 Jan 8 William Holcombe MA

1777 Jun 11 Hugh Michael Owen MA

1780 Apr 15 John Jorden MA

1808 Aug 23 John Hunter Humphreys LLB

1852 Feb 18 Owen Tudor Henry Phillips

1894 May 4 William Jenkins

More Mathias 1543 Laurenny PRO223/423 Churchwarden

Thomas Thomas 1543 Laurenny PRO 223/423 Churchwarden

Extract from (A Plan of Milford Haven by L. Morris 1743.)

Laurenny in Milford Haven

Description

Here large ships take in Coal and Culm, which are brought them in barges from Cresswell, and they may lie here safe in three fathoms at low water; but the place will be inevitably spoiled in a few years unless persons in power will take care to prevent Vessels throwing their ballast out in the channel.

Lawrenny Quay once an important coal and limestone exporting point now a marina and yacht station.

(Acc/to The Pembrokeshire Coast National Park by Dillwyn Miles.)

Lawrenny Quay, once a busy inland port. The little village has a tall towered church dedicated to St Caradog, Anthracite coal was exported from Cresswell Quay. 

John Jones M.D in 1698 bequeathed certain lands and tenements for the relief of poor families and for apprenticing poor children of the parishes of Lawrenny, Cosheston, St David’s and Lampeter Velvrey, now producing a considerable sum annually which is distributed in proportion to the number of deserving objects in the different parishes.

Henry Lort of Prickeston, brother of Sir Roger Lort of Stackpole, was Sheriff in 1653; his grandson, John, in 1723, and his great-grandson, John, in 1775. This last John married Dorothy, daughter of John Barlow of Lawrenny, and from the marriage of their daughter Elizabeth with Dr. George Phillips of Haverfordwest come the present family of Lort-Phillips at Lawrenny. The younger sister of Elizabeth, Anne Lort, married John Meares of Eastington, who was Sheriff in 1800.

(South Pembrokeshire – Mrs Mary Mirehouse.)

(RCAM.)

(HILL FORTS)

Bean Close Earthwork.

A previously unnoticed earthwork not marked on the 6 in. Ord. sheet stands on a field known as the "Bean Close," distant about 500 yards north Cresswell ruins (It is roughly circular, about 830 feet in circumference. The enclosing rampart, which is much decayed, is at its best on the south, where it rises 3 feet and falls 6 feet to a ditch now considerably silted up. The entry was to the east, and had probably a width of 10 feet to 15 feet. The earthwork is overlooked, and the enclosure may have been of agricultural rather than of military purpose.

Cresswell Castle and Chapel.

The ruins of a domestic residence, known locally as ‘The Palace,’ probable because it might have been occupied by Barlow, Bishop of St. Davids (1536-48). A little later it was purchased from the crown by Barlow’s descendants.

So far as the dense vegetation in which the ruins lie buried permits of examination, the house appears to have formed a rectangle (30 feet be 40 feet) with a round turret at each angle. Two (and possibly three) of these turrets are rude vaulted in the style common to the towers of the Pembrokeshire 13th century churches, making it probable that the later domestic residence had been a earlier castellated building. The fourth tower is a dove cot, and seems to have always been so. The courtyard is about 15 feet by 20 feet. The towers at standing to the height of 16 feet, and the walls are occasionally visible through the thick undergrowth, while the sites of different buildings around the quadrangle are discernible, but no detailed examination is possible under existing conditions. There are traces of a fine porch and doorway midway in the eastern front, and of a short broad walk to the banks of the Cresswell river, a tributary of the Cleddau, which runs past the house and is tideable to this point.

Beyond the north wall stretched the garden, an almost square enclosure with a pleasant river frontage. In the corner outside the north-west tower of the residence is a spring which first rose into a well, and by its overflow supplied a fish pond in the centre of the enclosure. The stables and out-buildings appear to have been placed against the east wall of the house.

The Chapel. About 300 yards west of the mansion stand the ruins of a small domestic chapel. The building forms a rectangle 20 feet by 10 feet.

The doorway is in the north wall, and a few feet to the south is the only remaining window a single light under a plain straight-pointed arch. The south wall seems to have had no window-spaces. Across the church beneath the western wall runs stone bench. The east Wall collapsed in 1921; the others stand to the height of about 10 feet. In the north-east corner is a small cupboard or aumbry.

NOTE.— in the 17th century the then representative of the Barlow family forsook Cresswell for the neighbouring mansion of Lawrenny, the former being left to go to ruin.

The chapel is called Christ’s Well in the crown conveyance to Thomas and Roger Barlow and it is probable that the edifice was first erected upon the site as the chapel of the well already mentioned There would doubtless also be provided a house for the attendant priest; this probably gave way to a Tudor mansion.

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Letterston         (Treletert) 940297

A long village (with its axis running across the A40) to the north of Haverfordwest. Once a Norman manor ruled by one Letard, by all accounts a very unpleasant Fleming. The village is very similar in form to Cosheston in the south. At one time an important cattle market, Letterston owes most of its growth to the railway era, with the junction of Pembrokeshire’s two Fishguard lines just to the north of the village.

(Acc/to The Topographical Dictionary of Wales. S. Lewis 1834.)

Letterson, Lettardston or Letterston a parish in the hundred of Dewisland county of Pembroke 10 miles N from Haverfordwest containing 493 inhabitants. This place derived its name from the ancient family of Lettards, to whom the parish anciently belonged, and who gave the advowson of the living together with the chapel of Llanvair to the preceptory of the knights of St John of Jerusalem, which had been founded at Slebech in this county. The parish is pleasantly situated in the NW part of the county and is intersected by the turnpike road from Haverfordwest to Fishguard. The surrounding scenery is pleasing and in certain places somewhat picturesque; the distant views embrace an extensive tract of finely diversified and richly cultivated country.

In the vicinity are some handsome seats and pleasing villas; and within the parish is Heathfield Lodge, the property of John Hill Harris Esq of Priskilly Forest, and now the residence of the gentlemans brother in law, William Jones Esq. The living is a discharged rectory, with the perpetual curacy of Llanvair Nabt y Grove annexed in the archdeaconry and diocese of St David’s rated in the kings books at £12 11s ½d and in the patronage of the King as Prince of Wales. The church dedicated to St Giles is not remarkable for any striking architectural features. The rectory house has been recently rebuilt, under the provisions of Gilbert’s act of Parliament by the present incumbent and is a handsome edifice. In this parish, on a common near the road are several tumuli, supposed to be sepulchral. The average annual expenditure for the maintenance of the poor amounts to £65 12s.

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

The Church of the vill of letard (Letterston) was granted to the Knights of St John of Jerusalem; that is to say to the preceptory of Slebech by Yvo the son of Letard. - Bishop Anselm’s Confirmtory Charter.

In 1594 the church was in the hands of the Crown. - (Owen’s Pem.)

Described as Ecclesia de Villa Becard, no doubt a mistake for "Letard," this church was in 1291 assessed at £14 I3s. 4d. for tenths to the King, the amount payable being £1 8s. 4d. - (Taxatio.)

Leeston.—Doctor Leyson rector ibidem ex collacione pre ceptoris de Slebeche. - (Valor Eccl.)

Under the heading ‘Livings Discharged‘:-Letter-stone alias Tre Lethert R. (St. Giles) with Llanvair Chapel (St.Mary). Pens. Praeceptor. Slebeche, 8s. Prox. Quo-libet tertio anno, Visit. Archidiac. Quolibet 5s 8d. Valet in mans. Cert. terr., &c. Prince of Wales. Clear yearly value, £40. £70. King’s Books, £12 11s. 0d. - (Bacon’s Liber Regis.)

The old church [of Letterston] was situated about three-quarters of a mile from the one now in use. Its site is at present occupied by a farm house, known as Hen Eglwys. - (Arch. Camb., Ser. V., Vol. XV., p. 185.)

(Acc/to The Old Parish Churches of South West Wales – Mike Salter 1994.)

St Giles: In the church of 1881 are a 14c female effigy, a 15c piscine and a 15c hexagonal font with scallops.

Castle Bucket Defended Enclosure 1 mile NNW of Letterston.

This is the remains of a defended hill slope enclosure. It consists of a circular bank with traces of two short banks extending northwards – probably the remains of an annex. There is no sign of an outer ditch, and the interior has been two severely ploughed for there to be any upstanding remains of huts. It has been suggested that this may not have been a defensive site but the remains of an earlier prehistoric ritual site.

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Little Haven         (856128)

Little Haven. A charming village nestled into a cove at the foot of a steep cliff in a narrow valley at the south end of Broad Haven beach. Once a coal-mining centre, with the remains of bell pits and of tramways the village is now given over to tourism. It has a safe sandy. Beach and is popular with sailors and other sea sport enthusiasts. The church is at Walton West, up the steep hill to the east.

There are Iron Age forts – one of which has a hotel very near, situated in a cove at the south end of Broadhaven beach.

Coal from local pits used to be exported from the sheltered beach and there are culm and coal pits all around inland and along cliffs. At Falling Cliff collapsed Tudor bell pits, exposed coal measures at Strawberry Hill and at Woodland bell pits with the remains of a tramway.

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Little Newcastle

(Acc/to A History of Quakers in Pembrokeshire by Stephen Griffith.)

quotes a list taken from an incomplete catalogue by Glenn, entitled Welsh Founders of Pennsylvania

Little Newcastle: Morgan David, farmer (before 1694) (figure in bracket denote year of emigration).

(Acc/to The Old Parish Churches of South West Wales - Mike Salter 1994.)

Church on ancient foundations but has been completely rebuilt and lacks old features.

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

This benefice was granted by Adam de Rupe to Pill Priory, and in the grant it is described as the church of St. David of Newcastle, but in Parochiale Wallicanum it is ascribed to St. Peter. Its annual value including the glebe was in 1535-6 stated to be £40 - (Valor Ecc.) In 1594 it was in the hands off the Crown as being part of the possessions of that priory. - (Owen's Pem.) In 1536 the rectory of Newcastle and Rupe [Roch] was leased to Edward Lloid of the Household for 21years. - (State Papers.)

The tithes of Little Newcastle were in 1645 owned by Sir John Stepney of Prendergast, Pems. Bart., who was MP., for Haverfordwest in 1640. Sir John had been taken prisoner at the capture of Hereford in December 1645 by Col. Birch, the parliamentary commander and was imprisoned in the Compter, Southwark. Sir John alleged that he had not been in arms against the Commonwealth but had arrived in Hereford three week before his capture, and was waiting there for a pass from the wife of Major General Laugharne. This defense however proved of little avail, and Sir John was fined £1230.

On 31 May, 1649, the inhabitants of Newcastle in Kemes petitioned the Commonwealth for an augmentation for their minister, their maintenance being only £4 a year, so that they could not procure any godly and able minister to reside amongst them. Sir John Stepney held the tithes, which were worth £20 on 18 June 1649, Sit John's fine was reduced to £530 provided he settled £70 yearly on certain rectories. - (Compound. Papers.)

On 13 Jan., 1845, the benefices of Little Newcastle and St. Dogwells were united under an Order in Council.

On 8 Sept., 1870, plans for the rebuilding of the church of Little Newcastle were approved by the Chapter. - (Chapter Acts.)

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Llandewi Velfrey         (SN 144158)

(Acc/to South Pembrokeshire Place Names - P. Valentine Harris.)

Llandewi Velfry. 1385, P.R. Trefeandegh. 1533 - 4, Ecclesia de landewy et Tresendeg or Trefendeg.

There is a Llandwiveri in Cardiganshire which represents "Church of St. Dewi or David."For 'Velfry' see Lampeter Velfry.

St David: The 13c nave and the 14c chancel are much renewed. The 16c chapel has one arch to the chancel and two arches to the chancel.

(Acc/to the Topograpical Dictionary of Wales. - S. Lewis 1834.)

Llandewi Velvrey a parish principally in the hundred of Narberth but partly in that of Dungleddy county of Pembroke 2 mile ENE from Narberth, containing 710 inhabitants. This place is situated in a rich and fertile vale watered by the river Taf which separates the parish from that of Llangan in the county of Carmarthen. The lands are wholly enclosed and in a good state of cultivation and the soil is eminently fertile. The neighbourhood abounds with pleasing and interesting scenery and is enlivened with several gentlemen's seats of which the principal are Trewern, the residence of John Thomas Benyon Esq and Henllan the seat of John Lewis Esq. The living consists of a rectory and a vicarage, in the archdeaconry of Carmarthen and diocese of St David's; the former , which is a sinecure is rated in the King's books at £8 and in the patronage of the Principal and Tutors of St David's College Lampeter; the vicarage which is discharged is rated at £7 9 4 1/2d. and in the patronage of the crown; the tithes of the entire parish are equally divided between rector and vicar. The church dedicated to St David is remarkable for the simplicity of its architecture and displays evident features of very remote antiquity; an elegant mural tablet of white marble to the memory of the late David Lewis Esq., of Henllan and his youngest daughter has lately been put up in the chancel by his widow. The vicarage house has been nearly rebuilt on an enlarged scale by the present incumbent, under the provisions of an act of parliament commonly called the Gilbert Act. A school house built at the expense of the parish in 1828 is at present occupied by one of Mrs Bevan's circulating charity schools. The average annual expenditure of the poor amounts to £331 3d.

Henllan, a hamlet forming that part of the parish of Llandewi-Velvrey which is in the hundred of Dungleddy, county of Pembroke 2 miles NE from Narberth, containing 39 inhabitants. It appears to have taken its name signifying "the old Church" from a chapel of ease which according to tradition, originally existed here. A considerable portion of the land within its limits, called "Bishop's Land" is tithe free; and it is not improbable that, being in a detached portion of the hundred of Dungleddy, entirely surrounded by that of Narberth, it was originally wholly held by the Bishop and that the occupiers of it did service at Lawhaden, the principal residence of the bishop's of St David's. The seat of John Lewis Esq bearing the same name as the hamlet is pleasantly situated on an eminence within its limits. There are no remains of the ancient chapel; but there is a place of worship for Baptists. In this part of the parish are two ancient British encampments, one called Cyra probably a corruption of Caerau, the other Pen Y Gaer, but no particulars of their history have been recorded. Within the last few years, a pot of silver coins was dug up on a farm in this hamlet, but being sold immediately on their discovery, no particular account of them has been preserved.

The inhabitants are assessed for the repair of their own roads, but do not separately support their poor.

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

This benefice comprises a sinecure rectory and a vicarage. Formerly the two incumbents were called portioners on account of the fruits of the living being shared, although not equally between them. The patronage of the two portioners appears to have belonged to the Lord of Narberth.

Described as Ecclesia de Landewy and Tresendek, this church was assessed in 1291 for tenths to the King at £8. - (Taxatio.) Whether Tresendek was a distinct church annexed to Landewy is an undecided question, but if it was a separate church, the suggestion made by the editor of Owen's Pem. that Tresendek is possibly Egremont, is probably correct.

Llandewy Wylfref. - Johannes Lewis clerieus porcion-arius ibidem ex presentacione domini de Nerbertb valet communlbus annis clare £8. Inde decima 16s. - (Valor Eccl.)

Llandewy.—David Robert porcionarius et curatus ibidem communibus annis percipit fructus et emolimenta ejusdem ultra sinodales et procuraciones ejusdem quolibet anno clare £7 9s. 3d. Inde decima 14s. 11d. - (Valor Eccl.)

Under the heading 'Livings Discharged':- Llanddewi Willfrei alias Uan Ddewi Velfrey, Second Portion alias V. (St. David). The Prince of Wales. Clear yearly value £38. £50 King's Books, £7 8s. 4d. - (Bacon's Liber Regis.)

On 1st Nov. 1893, a faculty was obtained for the restoration of this church, and on 29 Oct., 1905, a faculty was granted for the erection of a memorial tablet in the church.

Browne Willis mentions chapels at Henllan and Llandeilo LLwan Gwaddon, both dedicated to St. Teilo, as being subordinate to Llanddewi Yelfrey. - (Paroch. Wall.) Llandeilo Llwan Gwaddon is identified as Crinow. - (Owen's Pem. Pt. 1, p. 166.)

(Acc/to Protestant Dissenters in Wales 1639 - 1689 - by Geraint H Jenkins.)

Christopher Jackson rector mixed pages from the Prayer Book with tobacco in his pipe and warned all and sundry that only the wicked welcomed the return of the King.

12 August 1415. Commission to Master John Archdeacon of St. David and Sir Thomas Britte, Prior of the Priory of Carmarthen, to the resignation of Master Philipp Craddok of his canonry in the church of Llanddewi Brefi and of his prebend of Dibewydd in the same church & to institute Sir John Sixy to the same. Given at Portchester.

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Llandeilo Llwydarth         SN 099269

St Teilo

(Acc/to The Old Parish Churches of South West Wales - Mike Salter 1994.)

Only the lower part of the walls of this remote church now survive although it was roofed until early this century. In a brick pump house serving the nearby farm is St Teilo's well. The waters were said to be effective as a cure only if drunk early in the morning out of part of the skull which was purchased by museum officials in 1950. It was said to be the skull of the saint himself and has now vanished, (but see the Welsh Churchman May 1994 page 4).

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Llandeilo

(Acc/to the Topographical Dictionary of Wales - S. Lewis 1834.)

Llandilo (Llan-Deilo), a parish in the hundred of Kemmes, county of Pembroke 11 miles N of Narberth containing 117 inhabitants. This parish, which is not of very great extent is pleasantly situated in the eastern part of the county bordering on Carmarthenshire. It derives its name from dedication of its church to St Teilo one of the most eminent saints of British antiquity who flourished in the latter part of the 5th and the beginning of the 6th c. The surface is boldly undulated and in some parts rises into abrupt eminences, among which are some of the highest summits of the Precelly range of Mountains. The lands are but partially enclosed and cultivated; and the soil is various being in some parts fertile and in others thin and poor. Slate of good quality is found in abundance within the parish; some quarries of it are worked with advantage, the produce consisting of roofing slates, which are in high estimation. The living is a perpetual curacy annexed to that of Llangolman in the archdeaconry and diocese of St David's and endowed with £800 royal bounty. There is a place of worship for Independents. The average annual expenditure for the support of the poor is £17 10s.

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

There appears to be no mention of this church in the Valor Eccl. George Owen, writing in 1594, states that it was a curacy appertaining to the vicarage of Maen-clochog, which vicarage was then in the Queen's hands, as belonging to the monastery [of St. Dogmaels] - (Owen's Pem.) See under Maenclochog.

In 1536-7 a lease of the rectory of Llandeilo (lately owned by the abbey of St. Dogmaels) was granted for 21 years to John Leche of La Haddin (Lawhaden). - (State Papers.)

Under the heading "Not in Charge":- Llandeilo Cur. (St. Teilaw). The church down united to Maenclochogg. Hugh Boylen, clerk, 1765. - (Bacon's Liber Regis.)

The benefices of Llandeilo, Llangolman, and Maencloch-clochog were united be an Order in Council, dated 11 July, 1877.

The church of Llandeilo is now in ruins, and has been in that state for over 70 years. In 1898 the walls of the nave were nearly gone; the chancel with part of the east wall was then standing, but in some places the walls were only 4ft. high or less. - (Arch. Camb., Ser. V. Vol. 15, p 277.)

The earliest incumbent of Llandeilo, of whom there is record, is William Rees, who held it and also Maenclochog in 1617.

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Llandeloy

David Martin, with the consent of his Chapter, appropriated the church of Lannowell in Pebydiaul:, in his own donation, to the Chapter of St. Davids, and in Feb., 1307, he also appropriated the church of Landelowe in Pebydi-auk to the same Chapter, with the proviso that the church was not to be deprived of its proper services. Stat. Menev. It would seem, however, that the Bishop relied on Sir John Wogan of Picton Knt., to get the necessary permit from the King for this appropriation, and this was not obtained till 25 Mar., 1313, when the nature of the appropriation was so changed, as to render it almost certain that the original intention, which was to recompense the Chapter for an annual charge of £10 payable by the latter for the use of the Cathedral, had been altered in view of an arrangement whereby Sir John Wogan endowed a chantry in the Cathedral. — Stat. Menev. On 25 Mar., 1313, licence was granted by the king to David Martin Bishop of St. Davids, for the alienation in mort-main of the advowsons of the two churches to the Precentor and Chapter of St. David's Cathedral, and for the chapter to appropriate the same for the sustenance of three chaplains to celebrate divine service in the Cathedral for the King's soul and the souls of his ancestors and successors, and for the souls of William de Valence and John Wogan and their heirs, although in the case of a voidance to the see, the King might lose the presentation of Llandeloy.

(Acc/to The Topographical Dictionary of Wales - S. Lewis 1834.)

Llandeloy, a parish in the hundred of Dewisland, county of Pembroke 7 miles E by N from St Davids containing 217 inhabitants. This parish which derives its name from the dedication of its church is pleasantly situated in the NW part of the county. The living is a discharged rectory annexed to that of Llanhowel in the archdeaconry and diocese of St David's, rated in the king's books at £5 endowed with £800 royal bounty and £200 parliamentary grant. The church dedicated to St Teilaw, is not remarkable for any interesting architectural features. The average annual expenditure for the support of the poor is £65 18.

(Restored Church of St Teilo in 1924 by J. Coates Carter).

Narrow nave, raised chancel sanctuary, scissor beams, rood screen and loft, Norman font.

(Acc/to The Old Parish Churches of South West Wales - Mike Salter 1994.)

This church lay in ruins from c1850 until the 1920's being temporarily superseded by an iron church of 1897. A narrow arch of c1200 divides the nave and narrow chancel and the north doorway is roundheaded. The chancel south wall is thick enough to contain small rooms. There is a south transept with a low arch to the nave and a squint to the chancel. The former rood-loft staircase now gives access to the pulpit.

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Llanfair Nantygof

(Acc to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

St Mary’s

This benefice, described as the church of Landegof, in Pebydiauk was with two caracates of land, except the lords chapel, granted to the knights of St. John at Slebech, by Robert, the son of Humphrey - (Anselm's Confirms. Charter.)

In 1594 Llanfair Nantygof is described as a chapel annexed to the rectory of Letterston - (Owen.)

There appears to be no valuation of this benefice in the Valor Eccl. For the extract from Bacon's Liber Regis see under Letterston.

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Llandissilio St Tyssilio     (SN 120218)

(Acc/to the Topographical Dictionary of Wales.)

Llandissilio a parish partly in the lower division of the hundred of Derllys county of Carmarthen and partly that of Dungleddy county of Pembroke 5 1/2 miles N by E from Narberth on the road to Cardigan containing 1025 inhabitants. This parish which derives its name from the dedication of the church is about 5 miles in length and four miles in breadth, and comprises two divisions, which are respectively situated in the counties of Carmarthen and Pembroke, each separately maintaining its own poor; the lands are enclosed and in a good state of cultivation and the soil is in general, fertile. It constitues a prebend in the collegiate church of Brecknoch, rated in the kings books at £12 9s 4 1/2.d and in the patronage of the Bishop of St David's . The living is a discharged vicarage in the archdeaconry of Carmarthen and diocese of St David's rated in the King’s books at £7, endowed with £400 royal bounty and in the patronage of the Bishop of St Davids. The Church dedicated to St Tysilio has no architectural claims to notice. In the churchyard leaning against the south side of the church is an ancient stone of large dimensions, with the inscription in rude characters LVTORICI FIL PAVLINI MARINI LATIO. It was dug up from under a heap of rubbish by the present incumbent, in the year 1827 and placed by him in its present situation; tradition, however, of its existence had been preserved in the parish which led to its discovery. There is a place of worship for Baptists in that division of the parish which is in the county of Carmarthen and one for Independents in that which is in the county of Pembroke. Morris Jones Esq in 1621 bequeathed a rent charge of £2 payable out of his farm of cae Helig in the parish of Wrexham county of Denbigh, to be distributed in white bread among the poor of the parish. John Matthias of Kilvaur, bequeathed £1 1s per annum for a sermon on the uncertainty of human life to be preached here annually on the second Sunday in June. Cicely Morris by deed enrolled in 1776 gave £2 2s. per annum for the instruction of five poor children of this parish and £2 2s. for apprenticing them to some trade, these sums are chargeable on lands in the parish and are duly appropriated according to the intention of the benefactress.

On the farm of Casgwyn in that part of the parish which is in the county of Pembroke, is an ancient encampment comprising a semi circular area 240 yds in circumference with an entrance 15 yds in width. The aspect is to the west and commands an extensive tract of country. Small cannon balls have been turned up by plough in its vicinity. Another encampment of similar form and commanding the same tract of country is seen on a farm called Portispark, in the part of the parish which is in the county of Carmarthen; it is situated on an eminence and included an area of which the cord is one hundred and thirty yards in length. On the farm of Llwynyebol is a circular encampment thirty yards in diameter surrounded by a rampart 3ft high; in the centre are two stones 4ft in height and in a position inclining from the perpendicular. There were formerly about 20 of these varying in height and at a distance of 200 yards to the NW is a small circle within which are 2 erect stones from 4 to 5 ft in height near which it is supposed was formerly a third stone so placed as to form an altar. Two avenues of stones, in opposite directions, but both tending to the circular enclosure may still be traced; and around this relic of British antiquity are scattered numerous barrows, varying in dimensions, in one of which, on its being cut through in forming the present road from Narberth to Cardigan was found an entire vessel rudely formed of coarse pottery.

The average annual expenditure for the support of the poor amounts to £270 5s. of which sum £179 2s. is raised on that part which is in the county of Carmarthen and £91 3s. on that in the county of Pembroke.

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

This vicarage is in the patronage of the Bishop, and the rector of this church was the prebendary of Llandissilio in the Collegiate Church of Brecon.

This church was assessed in 1291 at £8 for tenths to the King. - (Taxatio.)

Llandissilio.—Johannes Roblyn vicarius ibidem pro porcione vicarie ibidem commmibus antis walet £7 Inde decima 14s. - (Valor Eccl.)

Under the heading 'Livings Discharged':- Llandes-silio alias Llan Dyssylio V. (St. Tyssilio). Bishop of St. Davids. Prebendary in the Church of Breeon Impr. Clear yearly value, £17. Kings Books, £7. - (Bacons Liber Regis.)

In 1749 this living was sequestrated owing to a vacancy.

(Acc/to The old Parish Churches of South West Wales by Mike Salter 1994.)

The nave seems to have been widened as its width now corresponds to that of the chancel and the narrow north vestry or chapel. Except for one 17c south window and a 15c top to that next to it all the openings are 19c. Set in the south wall are two early inscribed stones.

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Llanfair Nant Gwyn 164376

Church St Mary's

1855 isolated church designed by R. J. Withers wooden spire.

(Acc/to A Topographical Dictionary of Wales 1834 - S. Lewis.)

Llanvair Nantgwyn, a parish in the hundred of Kemmes, county of Pembroke 8 miles SW of Cardigan containing 237 inhabitants. This parish, which is pleasantly situated in the NE part of the county derives its name from the dedication of its church to St Mary, and its distinguishing adjunct probably from the abundance of white quartz stones scattered over the lands and in the bed of a brook by which it is watered. It comprehends a tract of about one thousand four hundred acres of rather flat but dry land, the whole of which is enclosed and in a good state of cultivation; the soil though light, is in general fertile, and the inhabitants are chiefly employed in agriculture; the surrounding scenery is not distinguished by any peculiarity of feature, but from the higher grounds are some good prospects over the adjacent county. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the archdeaconry of Cardigan and diocese of St David’s endowed with £800 royal bounty, and in the patronage of Major Bowen. The church, dedicated to St David, is not distinguished by any architectural details of importance. There is a place of worship for Bapists. John Jones, in 1729 bequeathed a rent charge of ten shillings to the poor of this parish. The average annual expenditure for the maintenance of the poor is £68 5s.

(Acc/to The Old Parish Churches of South West Wales -- Mike Salter 1994.)

Church on ancient foundations but has been completely rebuilt and lack old features

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

This living is a perpetual curacy now held in plurality with Whitechurch Rectory. In pre-Reformation times it was a free chapel and was with the free chapel of Penkelly Vachan held with the vicarage of Eglwyswrw which was appropriated to the abbey of St. Dogmaels. See under Eglwysww. Vol. 1. p. 293.

In 1594 the living is described as a free chapel curacy, in the hands of the King.Owen's Pem.

Under the heading 'Not in Charge':-Llanvair Nant-gwyn C. (St. Mary), annexed to Whitchurch. £3 certified value. - (Bacon's Liber Regis.)

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Llanfallteg - West St Mallteg     (SN 147193)

(Acc/to The old Parish Churches of South West Wales by Mike Salter 1994.)

The church has been mostly rebuilt. The nave and vaulted north transept are 13c in origin, whilst the chancel was rebuilt wider later in the medieval period.

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Llanfihangel Penbedw - St Michael’s     (SN 208395)

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

The earliest record of this rectory is in 1325, which shows that shortly previous to that date the patronage of the benefice belonged to John de Hastings, Earl of Pembroke. On 3 Dec., in that year, the church of Lanvihanel in Wales, of the annual value of 6 marks, was assigned to Thomas Le Blount and Juliana his wife, late the widow of John de Hastings, as dower from her late husband.—Close Rolls. By 1594 the living had come into the possession of the Crown. -  (Owen's Pem.)

In 1291 this church was assessed at £4 for tenths to the King. - (Taxatio.)

Llanvyhangell Penbedo.—-Ecclesia ibidem ad plesent-acionem dicte Domine Regine unde Johannes est rector valet coramurlibus annis £6. Inde decima 12s - (Valor Eccl.)

Under the heading 'livings Discharged':—Penbedw alias Uan Fihangel Penbedw R. (St. Michael) - The Prince of Wales. King’s Books, £6. Clear yearly value £24. £40.—Bacons liber Regis.

(Acc/to A Topographical Dictionary of Wales 1834 - S. Lewis.)

Llanvihangel-penbedw, a parish in the hundred of Kilgeran, county of Pembroke. 5 miles SSE from Cardigan containing 353 inhabitants. This parish, which is inconsiderable extent, derives its name from the dedication of its church to St Michael, and the distinguishing adjunct to it from the number of fine birch trees growing in the vicinity. It is pleasantly situated in the NE part of the county, and near the source of the river Nevern, which after flowing through the parish, continues its course in a westerly direction, and falls into the sea at Newport. The land is all enclosed and in a good state of cultivation; and the surrounding scenery is agreeably diversified.

Kilrhue, the property of Thomas Lloyd of Bronwydd, Esq., and now the residence of Dr Morgan is a good mansion pleasantly situated in grounds tastefully laid out and comprehending an agreeable variety of pleasing scenery. The old road leading from Carmarthen to Cardigan passes through the village. The living is a discharged rectory in the archdeaconry of Cardigan and diocese of St David's rated in the king's books at £6, and in the patronage of the King, as Prince of Wales. The church is not remarkable for any peculiar architectural details. There is a place of worship for Baptists. The average annual expenditure for the maintenance of the poor is £76 15s.

(Acc/to The Old Parish Churches of South West Wales - Mike Slater 1994.)

This derelict ivy-grown church with a horse kept in the churchyard has a long narrow nave, a low west tower, a north transept, and a chancel reached through a plain pointed arch. Most of it is 13c but no pre 19c openings now survive.

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Llanfyrnach     (220312)

A hamlet to the SE of Crymych. Surprisingly, in such a Welsh area, the church has a tower unusual in a welsh area. There used to be much industry hereabouts - traces can be seen in the abandoned lead workings NE of the hamlet and in the massive slate quarry at Glogue. Slates from this quarry used on the roof of the Palace of Westminster.

Damaged Ogham stone in nearby Glandwr Chapel.

(Acc/to The Old Parish Churches of South West Wales - Mike Salter 1994.)

Church on ancient foundations but has been completely rebuilt and lack old features

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

Described as Ecclesia Sancti Bernachi de Blaentav in Bemeys, the church of Llanfnnach, with 100 acres of land, was granted by Robert, the son of Stephen. to the Knights Hospitallers of St. John of Jerusalem. — Anselm's Confirm. Charter. This grantor was the son of Stephen, constable of Cardigan Castle, and Nesta his wife, the daughter of Rhys ap Tudor, Prince of South Wales widow of Gerald de Windsor. On the dissolution of the establishment of Slebech, this living came into the hands of the Crown.

Described as Ecclesia Sancti Bernaci super Taff, this church was in 1291 assessed at £6 13s. 4d. for tenths to the King. - (Taxatio.)

Uanvernach super Tave.—Ecelesia ibidem ex collaci-one preceptoris de Slebech unde Thomas Lloid clericus est rector valet eommunibus annis dare £10. Inde decima 20s. - (Valor Eccl.)

Under the heading 'livings Discharged': lanver-nach alias Llan Fernach R. (St. Brynach). Precept-de Slebech Patr. The Prince of Wales.. Clear yearly value, £40, £60 - (Bacon's Liber Regis.)

(Acc/to The Pembrokeshire Coast National Park by Dillwyn Miles.)

St Brynach received a warm welcome here after failing to find shelter elsewhere and gave the place his name. The church along with eight others in north Pembrokeshire is dedicated to him.

Llanfyrnach was noted for its silver lead mine up to a century ago, which produced some 1,000 tons a year.

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Llangan         (See also - Whitland)

(Acc/to the Topographical Dictionary of Wales.)

a parish chiefly in the lower division of the hundred of Derlly's county of Carmarthen but partly in the hundred of Dungleddy county of Pembroke 16 miles W of Carmarthen containing 733 inhabitants of which number 710 are in Carmarthenshire and the remainder in the Pembrokeshire portion of it. On the banks of the Taf in this parish anciently stood the famour Ty Gwyn ar Daf or "White house on the Taf" an occasional residence of Hywel Dda sovereign of all Wales, who about the year 940 convoked at this place a grand national council for the purpose of compiling and enacting the code of laws which has given so much celebrity to his reign and which are still known as "the laws of Hywel the Good" In order to give greater solemnity to this convocation, and to implore the divine wisdom to assist their councils, the king remained here with his whole court during Lent in the constant exercise of prayer and other acts of devotion. Soon after the destruction of the monastery of Bangor-Iscoed, in North Wales and the slaughter and dispersion of the brethren of that extensive establishment by the Northumbrian Saxons, a religious society was settled at this place under the auspices of Paulinus son of Urien Reged, a disciple of St Germanus, in which originated the abbey of Albalanda or Whitland afterwards erected near the site and called by the Welsh after the name of the former establishment, Ty Gwyn ar Taf. According to some historians, this establishment which was for brethren of the Cistercian order was founded by Rhys ab Tewdwr, Prince of south Wales in the reign of William the Conqueror; but Bishop Tanner with more probability ascribes it to Bernard Bishop of St David's who presided over that see from 1115 to 1147. It is related in the Welsh annals that Cadwaladr brother of Owain Gwynedd, prince of North Wales during the disputes which arose between him and his nephews the sons of Owain, entrusted the custody of his newly erected castle of Cynvael to the abbot of Ty Gwyn ar Taf, who defended it with obstinate valour against the assaults of the young princes by whom it was besieged. After a determined resistance protracted till the walls of the castle were beaten down and the whole of the garrison either slain or wounded, the abbot effected his escape from the ruins, through the assistance of some friends in the camp of the enemy, and retired into his monastery. The monastery, which was dedicated to St Mary and had an establishment of 8 monks, continued to flourish till the dissolution at which time its revenue was estimated at £153 17s 2d. Its site was granted in the 36th of Henry VIII to Henry Audley and John Cordel.

The parish is pleasantly situated on the river Taf and is intersected by the old Whitland road from Carmarthen to Haverfordwest; it comprehends a large tract of good arable and pasture land, the whole of which with a very small exception is enclosed and in a good state of cultivation. The soil is fertile and the surrounding scenery is agreeably diversified and in many parts highly picturesque. This place constitutes a prebend in the cathedral church of St Davids rated in the king’s books at £7 and in the patronage of the Bishop of St Davids. The living is a discharged vicarage in the archdeaconry of Carmarthen and diocese of St Davids rated in the kings books at £3, endowed with £400 royal bounty and £1200 parliamentary grant and in the patronage of the bishop of St David's The tithes of the parish are divided between the prebendary and the vicar, the former of whom has two thirds and the latter one third; a part of it, which anciently belonged to the abbey is tithe free. The church dedicated to St Canna, is a neat modern edifice rebuilt in the year 1820 and consisting of a nave and chancel, the former erected by a parochial rated, and the later at the expense of the lessee of the prebendal tithes. A school-house has been erected in the churchyard but no school has yet been established in the parish. The existing remains of the abbey are very inconsiderable, serving only to point out the site, in a sequestered valley sheltered by groves of stately growth to the right of the present turnpike road from St Clear's to Narberth. Of the royal palace of Ty Gwyn which was comparatively a small building, designed chiefly for a hunting seat, no vestiges at present are discernable. The average annual expenditure for the support of the poor is £282 0s 6d

(Acc/to The Old Parish Churches of South West Wales - Mike Salter 1994.)

Church on ancient foundations but has been completely rebuilt and lack old features. The Church is now closed.

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Llangolman

(Acc/to the Topographical Dictionary of Wales - S. Lewis 1834.)

Llangolman, a parish in the hundred of Kemmes, county of Pembroke. 9 miles N from Narberth containing 331 inhabitants. This parish which derives its name from the dedication of its church to St Golman, is pleasantly situated on the eastern Cleddy river, and on the eastern extremity of the county, bordering on Carmarthenshire. The eastern part of it is intersected by the river, and the northern by the turnpike road leading from Fishguard to Narberth; the whole forms a considerable extent of arable and pasture land. The surrounding scenery is pleasingly varied and the views over the adjacent country embrace some interesting features. Slate of good quality is found within the parish, and some quarries are worked upon an extensive scale, affording employment to such of the inhabitants as are not engaged in agriculture. The living is a perpetual curacy annexed to that of Llandilo in the archdeaconry and diocese of St David, endowed with £800 royal bounty. The church is not distinguished by any architectural details of importance. The average expenditure for the support of the poor is £59 0s 9d.

(Acc/to A History of Quakers in Pembrokeshire by Stephen Griffith.)

THE SUFFERERS. No dates are given for imprisonment in Haverfordwest.

"The following were certainly residents of the County of Pembroke:"

Llangolman Lewis James

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

No description or valuation of this benefice is contained in the Valor Eccl. George Owen states that it was a curacy which, together with the curacy of Llandeilo, belonged to the vicarage of Maenclochog, that vicarage being in the patronage of the Queen, as part of the possessions of the monastery [of St. Dogmaels]. - (Owen's Pem.) See under Maenclochog.

In 1536 - 7 a lease of the rectories of Maenclochog, Llandeilo, and Llangolman was granted by the Crown to John Leche of La Hadden [Llawhaden] in South Wales. -  (State Papers.)

The living according to Bacon's Liber Regis (1786) was united to Llandeilo and Maenclochog and the same authority gives the following details in regard to it:- Llangolman Cur- (St Colman). Hugh Bowen, clerk,

On 11 July, 1877, the livings of Maenclochog, Llandeign and Llangolman were united under an Order is Council.

The earliest mention of an incumbent of this curacy is William Crowther in 1765.

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Llangwm (Lang Heim) 990093

(Acc/to South Pembrokeshire Place Names - P. Valentine Harris.)

Langum. The Langum folk still retain peculiarities of dress, language and custom. They are probably a Norse remnant left in the midst of the surrounding Flemish population.

The name also may be Norse lang heimr, the long village. (Owen.)

This village with a Welsh sounding name is located deep in the heart of the Englishry. For centuries the name has been pronounced "Lang-gum" and the locals will take great offence if you try to Welshify it. The original settlers here were either Norse seafarers or Flemings - whoever they were, the place developed a reputation for clannishness and resentment against outsiders.

Located on the west bank of the Daugleddau estuary, Llangwm was inevitably a fishing village, with local people making a living from herrings, oysters and cockles. During the 1800's and early 1900's there was much trade connected with the coal industry, and many local men worked at the Pembroke Dockyard. There is a village green, with a Victorianised bellcote church nearby. From Blacktar Point there are glorious views of the estuary, and cockles can still be dug from the mud.

Bellcote church 12c at one time the private chapel of the de la Roche family who also owned Benton Castle.

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

The name of this parish is given as ' Llangwm' in the Diocesan Directory, but Dr. Henry Owen and other authorities are of opinion that the name being of Norse de-rivation should be written as Langum. George Owen, the Pembrokeshire historian, spells the name Langom or Langome.

The Rectory was appendant to the manor of Langum. - (Owen's Pem.)

Originally it doubtless belonged to the Roches of Roch Castle, and probably descended to the Longueville and Ferrers families through the two daughters and coheiresses of Thomas Roch, one of whom married Sir George Longueville of Wolverton, Bucks, and the other married Edmund, Lord Ferrers of Chartley.

Langome.—Ecclesia ibidem ex collacione dounini Ferrers et Johannis Langvile militis unus Willelmus Wogan est rector habens ibidem unam rectoriam cum gleba et terris dominicalibus. Et valet rectoria commusibus annis in fructibus et emolimentis viij. Inde sol Pro ord-inaria visit acione quolibet tercio anno xvj d. Et in visitacione archidiaconi quolibet anno pro sinodalibus et pro-curacionibus vB ixd. Et remanet clare £7 12s. 11d. Inde decima 15s. 3d. - (Valor Eccl.)

Under the heading "Livings Discharged":— Llangwm R. (St. Hierom). Ordinario quolibet tertio anno, 1s. 4d. Archidiac. quolibet anno 5s. 9d. Dom. de Ferrers and al Patr., 1535; Henry Walter, 1705; Sir Arthur Owen, 1717; Sir Richard Walter, 1725; Elizabeth Elliot, widow, 1765- Clear yearly value, £47. King's Books, £7 12s. 11d. - (Bacons Liber Regis.)

On 10 July, 1656, the union of the parishes of Langwm, Rosemarket, and Freystrop was approved by the Commonwealth. — (State Papers.)

(Acc/to the Topographical Dictionary of Wales.)

Llangwm, a parish in the hundred of Rhos, county of Pembroke 5 miles SE by S from Haverfordwest containing 697 inhabitants. This parish, the name of which signifies "the church in the vale" is pleasantly situated on the western bank of Milford Haven about the same distance from Pembroke as from Haverfordwest. Great Nash, formerly the residence of the family of Owen now of Orielton and long noted for its hospitality, is now deserted by its proprietor and in ruins. Dumpledale the seat of Mrs Jorden is a handsome modern mansion,very pleasantly situated and commanding a fine view of Milford Haven. At the village, which extends along the shore is a horse ferry to the parish of Coedcanlais. The inhabitants are principally engaged in a lucrative oyster fishery, the produce of which is generally sold at two shillings a bushel (Winchester Measure), to dealers from the coast of Kent, more especially to those of Chatham and Rochester, by whom they are taken away in sloops for the supply of the London Market; the average annual amount of the profits of this fishery is about £2000 and in a good season it frequently exceeds £3000.

Coal and culm are found here in great abundance; the mines are worked by Sir John Owen Bart. who is the principle proprietor and the produce is shipped at Hook Quay for the supply of the whole district. The living is a discharged rectory in the archdeaconry and diocese of St David's rated in the kings books at £7 12s 11d. Endowed with £200 parliamentary grant, and in the patronage of Mrs Owen Barlow. The church dedicated to St Hierom is a spacious and venerable structure in the early style of English architecture, and contains some ancient monuments, among which are several to the memory of the family Roch. There is a place of worship for Methodists, George Roch in 1707 bequeathed a small rent charge for the instruction of poor children. The average annual expenditure for the support of the poor is £190 11s.

(RCAM Pembroke 1920 No 367.)

The church consists of nave, chancel, north transeptal chapel, south transept and modern south porch. The chancel arch is plain and pointed above it are two projecting corbels which supported the rood. The church is much modernised.

(Acc/to The Pembrokeshire Coast National Park by Dillwyn Miles.)

Formerly famed for its oysters and still some people use compass netting for salmon. This uses a net fixed to two poles which is lowered into the river on a rising tide and levered up smartly when the fisherman feels there is a fish in the net.

The Church is dedicated to St Jerome and has only a bellcote. It contains a canopied tomb with the effigy of a knight in armour, and another of a robed lady, probably members of the De la Roche family.

(Acc/to The old Parish Churches of South West Wales by Mike Salter 1994.)

The nave, the chancel, and a small barrel-vaulted south transept are 13c. In c1380 a bigger north transept, the Roch Chapel was added. It has a two bay arcade with Barri arms on the pier, two ogival headed recesses in the north wall containing the effigies of a cross-legged knight and lady, and a pillar piscina in the east wall. The church was heavily restored in 1856.

On 10th July 1656 the union of the parishes of Langwm, Rosemarket and Freystrop was approved by the Commonwealth.

Rectors.

1488 John David

1489 Apr 6 William Leya

1535 6 William Wogan

1540 Richard Smithe [Described in the "Calendar of State Papers" as Parson of Langom and it is stated that on 23 Feb 1540 he had been imprisoned by the bailiff for treasonable words]

1555 Mar 5 John Evans

1561 Mar 20 John Batho

1583 Griffith Toye

1627 Richard Bathoe

1628 Apr 9 Thomas Prichard

1663 Henry Purefoy

1671 Mar 23 John Lloyd BA

1673 July 8 David Lloyd MA

1694 Aug 7 Arnold Bowen MA

1705 Apr 3 John Gwynne BA

1717 Sep 3 John Herneman BA

1728 James Laugharne

1728 May 2 Charles Bowen

1765 June 3 James Higgon MA

1799 Feb20 John Morris

1833 Aug 27 Thomas Williams

1882 Sep 15 James Palmour

1895 June 11 John Daniel Timothy BA

1901 Dec 30 Henry Evans

It was the women who made their living from the sea even it was said the husbands were known by the names of their wives. No public house and strangers not welcome even preachers could be pelted with stones.

The fishwives walked miles carrying their peculiar shaped baskets of fish to sell in the towns and villages and there are photo's of them by St Catherines Rock in Tenby, but these hardy women have all died out. Dolly and Mary Palmer were two of the most famous of them, and appear in some paintings. Dolly died at 90 after sustaining a broken leg, she had walked for years to Pembroke and Tenby twice a week. Mary reached 96, she used to carry baskets of oysters to Carmarthen 30 miles away returning the next day.

Black Tar cockles can still be dug but unfortunately due to the pollution in the Haven are no longer fit to eat. [As I found out].

There was also trade in transhipping coal

(Acc/to W. Grenville Thomas published in the Western telegraph Oct 18 1989 as part of the Then and Now series.)

Llangwm Church

Acc to reputable tradition it was built during the 12c by the Great Nash branch of the distinguished de la Roche family who erected the early Roche Castle in about 1140 and granted the charter to the monks of Tiron, a reformed Benedictine Order for the founding of Pill Priory Milford 1170.

Certainly the basic layout of the structure - cruciform shape with a nave, chancel, north chapel and south transept conforms to the pattern of churches of the 12 &13c. The first explicit documentary allusion occurs in the Taxatio Ecclesiastica of 1291.

(PRO London) when the church of "Landegoin or Landegom" was assessed for tenths to the King at £8 - the actual tax payable being 16 shillings. The Church was a rectory in which the annual tithes to which all inhabitants were liable for the upkeep of the church were paid directly to the incumbent. - for centuries the advowson - the right of presentation to the living - was passed down the de la Roche family and their descendants like a piece of real estate. When the male line was extinguished with the death of Thomas de la Roche in about 1410 it was bestowed upon his two daughters, one of whom married Sir George Longueville (died 1457) of Wolverton Buck's and the other married Edmund Lord Ferrars of Chartley, from whom the Devereaux of Lamphey, earls of Essex were descended.

Unquestionably there were rectors before the John David (1488) who heads the Roll displayed in the church and Francis Green's list (West Wales Historical Records Vol 2) Recent research has unearthed a John Don, who was rector of Landegon (1440) over 40 years before that.

The small but elegant Lady Chapel (north aisle) contains several late medieval artefacts, evidence of the time when the church was a Roman Catholic place of worship. The chapel which was either built or reconstructed during the second halt of the 14c is entered through two small pointed arches of cut stone of the late Decorated Period (1330-1380) which have fine mouldings quite unlike the usual Pembrokeshire Gothic, and which rest on a plain octagonal pillar.

On the northern wall of the chapel are two boldly carved ogee- arched canopied recesses of the late Decorated or early Perpendicular period, under each of which is an effigy.

The one on the west is a mutilated female form which originally was not in this position but rested on the pavement beyond the communion rails. The one on the east is the effigy of a knight in full armour lying crosslegged, his right hand on his sword (broken), his left hand clasping his shield belt and his face turned towards the spectator. Tradition has confidently identified the effigy as that of a member of the de la Roche family and the viper story relayed by Fenton (1810) is well known. But the identification has been disputed. Influenced by the heraldic evidence on the tomb, some have claimed that the effigy was one of the great Nash family who lived at Great Nash during the reign of Elizabeth I. At the H'west meeting of Arch Camb 1897 Mr Stephen Williams, an expert in armour, drew attention to the corbie bird on the knight's helmet and insisted that the effigy was one of the Corbets who succeeded the Nashes at Great Nash (1655). The fascinating issue is discussed in the Society's volume for 1911. The lower front of the tomb is enhanced with a geometrical pattern into which a number of shields probably once emblazoned with the bearings of related families have been introduced.

On the east wall of the chapel is a pillared piscina alleged unique in Wales but similar to some which have been encountered in France. It consists of a canopy under which there is a basin supported by a shaft covered with a succession of unblazoned escutcheons. The rather crudely made canopy has a pinnacle, which is crocheted and surmounted by a finial in the form of a fleur-de-lis. Dating from the early 15c, the piscina was used for priestly ablutions during the Consecration. Near the piscina is a squint or hagioscope which was rediscoverd by Dr Henry Owen during the 1st half of the 20c. An oblique aperture through the wall with a lighted loop, it enabled those in the Lady Chapel to view the High Alter during the Elevation of the Host in the Eucharist. On the eastern wall of the south transept is the blocked wrongly named trefoil "leper's window" from which a bell was rung at the Sanctus and at Consecration of the elements to announce the Real Presence to those outside in the churchyard. In the transept itself, resting on an 18c table is a large black altar stone and leaning against the entrance to the transept are two 14c Calvary slabs.

In her manuscript "Langwm Scrapbook" (1953) the late Elizabeth Morgan reported that there had been an underground passage from Great Nash to the vicinity of the church but for reasons of safety it had been filled in at the Nash end by Mr George P George ( died 1939)

Even a parish with only 15 households in the far west of a sprawling and sparsely populated diocese could not remain indifferent to the 16c Reformation. The parish church of "Langome" was mentioned in the Valor Ecclesiasticus of 1536/7, the national survey which preceded the Dissolution of the Monasteries. Written in Latin the extract confirms that the advowson was still in the hands of the Longueville and Ferrars families, that the rector was William Wogan, and that the value of the benefice was £7.12s.11d - the average for the diocese was £10. Much more riveting is the revelation of the Calendar of State Papers that Wogan's successor, Richard Smithe was imprisoned by the bailiff (February 1540) for treasonable words. The iconoclastic, abrasive and sometimes litigious, Bishop Barlow (1536/47) had adopted a radical Protestant policy, and the likelihood is that the haples rector indiscreetly expressed conservative Catholic sentiments which were unacceptable to the aggressive new establishment. Though there is no direct evidence to verify it, it is tempting to conclude that John Bathoe who became rector of Llangwm in 1561 was the same man who had been ousted (1536/37) as the prior of the Augustinian friary at Haverfordwest during the Dissolution (Pembrokeshire County History Vol 3)

The Elizabethan Settlement (1559-1563) created the Anglican Church and restored communion in both kinds to the laity. One of the church's most prized possessions is an Elizabethan Chalice, with paten cover which has been carefully described in J. T. Evan's "The Church Plate of Pembrokeshire (1905) Six and three quarters inches high and over 12 1/2 ozs in weight, the bowl has been rather rudely repaired - in December 1832 - with a band of silver around the base.. Within the lower band on the bowl is inscribed " + POCYLUM + ECCLESIA + DE + LANGOM + " and underneath the foot RBP and RN have been roughly scratched. The oft repeated assertion that the chalice was a coronation gift from Elizabeth I is not convincing. Like the other 59 Elizabethan chalices in Pembrokeshire it was made by an unknown smith whose mark consisted of four oval-shaped objects. The overwhelming majority of these chalices bear the dates 1574 or 1575 - 15 years after the Queen's coronation. Although its position precludes careful scrutiny the church bell is reputed to be Elizabethan. It has a Latin inscription which translates into "Holy Trinity, One God. Have Mercy on Us."

At the time when most of the parish clergy were "simply learned" or meanly learned" and had not acquired the civilised restraint of their 20c counterparts, there was a marked difference in the quality of the rectors. Griffiths Toye, the incumbent for four years after 1583, was exceptional in that he was a graduate (B.A. and M.A.) of both Cambridge (1571) and Oxford (1574), who had been recruited as part of a diocesan campaign to raise the academic and preaching standards of the clergy.

His long-serving successor Richard Bathoe was transparently not of the same stature. He formally complained to the Court of Star Chamber (1602) that in a fracas at Pembroke he had been set upon by an armed gang of Essex sympathisers including some women, after he had made a slighting reference in private conversation to the late Earl executed for an abortive coup against the Queen. When indicted, the accused counter-alleged that the rector was "a common haunter of alehouses and wine tavens a dice player and an all night dancer, that for almost 12 months he had disturbed the peace of Haverfordwest and Pembroke by riding about provocatively waving his sword and pistol, and that he was so lacking in elementary learning as to be, by common consent, unworthy of his priestly office." - (Pembrokeshire County History Vol 3)

It was the rectorship (1643-1663) of Peregrine Phillips - coinciding with the Civil Wars (1642 - 1648) the Protectorate (1652-1658) and the Restoration (1660) - which was memorably eventful.

Acc/to J T Rees "History of Protestant Nonconformity in Wales" (1861) the Oxford-educated Phillips, the son of a vicar of Amroth, was appointed to the Llangwm living after briefly serving as his uncles curate at Kidwelly. Pluralism was very common, and with the backing of such gentlemen as Sir Hugh Owen, Sir Roger Lort and Sir John Meyrick, he was soon preferred first to Monkton and then to Pembroke St Mary's. When he preached before Oliver Cromwell and his troops during the siege of Pembroke (1648) he so impressed the future Protector that he was invited aboard the men-of-war about to undertake the Irish campaign. During the Protectorate, Phillips became widely known as a committed advocate of the government’s religious policy. A very accomplished orator, hailed by many as the best in the county, he preached in almost every church English and Welsh, and before the Justices of the Assizes at Cardigan, Haverfordwest and Carmarthen. He must have relinquished his Pembroke incumbency when the parishes of Llanwn, Freystrop and Rosemarket were united (July 1656). On one occasion, the intrepid rector had an experience which convinced many of his admirers that Providence had a special affection for him. When riding homeward late at night, both he and his horse plunged into a deep coal-pit at Freysrop and were firmly wedged in the narrow mouth a few feet from the surface. He was rescued by the proprietor Captain Longmans, who had been appraised of his perilous predicament by an un-named deaf woman and her alert grandson. Peregrine Phillips continued to be very active as an open-air preacher and public evangelist until soon after the restoration he fell foul of the Act of Uniformity (1662) which banned all acts of worship not conducted in accordance with the Book of Common Prayer. Ejected from the Established Church, this amiable but unrepentant non-conformist withdrew to Dredgeman Hill Farm which he held from Sir Herbert Perrot, of Haroldston, and which he converted into an Independent house church (1665). Thereafter he became the accredited pastor of the Green Meeting, a non-conformist group of 50/60 which assembled in a little room on St Thomas's Green and which was to develop into Albany Congregation ( now United Reformed) Church Haverfordwest. Upon his death at 68 years of age in September 1692, this unforgetteble former rector of Llangwm was buried near the pulpit at Haroldston church.

In contrast one of his successors, Richard Lloyd achieved distinction within the established church, Rector of Llangwm (1671) and Burton (1672) he eventually reached the elevated rank of Bishop of St David's (1686).

(Acc/to Medieval Buildings - published by Preseli District Council.)

At Great Nash the dovecote snuggles between two pleasing later farm buildings and a hundred yards away the two fine barrel vaults of the early house lie beneath a few ruined walls.

1671 value of the living of Llangwn £40 acc/to a (History of Rosemarket Church by Geoffrey Nicolle.)

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Llanhowel         (818274)

(Acc/to the Topographical Dictionary of Wales - S. Lewis 1834.)

Llanhowel, a parish in the hundred of Dewisland, county of Pembroke 4 1/2 miles E by N from St David's containing 186 inhabitants. This parish is pleasantly situated in the north western part of the county and nearly in the centre of a peninsular stretching into St George's channel and terminating in the promontory called St Davids Head. The surrounding scenery is pleasing, but not characterized by any peculiarity of feature. The living is a discharged vicarage with that of Llandeloy annexed in the archdeaconry and diocese of St David's and in the patronage of the Precentor and Upper Chapter of the cathedral church of St David's. The church dedicated to St Hoel, is not distinguished by any architectural details of importance. The average annual expenditure for the support of the poor is £68 16s

Church St Hywel, probable site of an early Celtic monastic community, nave and chancel 12c., north chapel 14c renovated 1870s. 5c stone with Latin inscription

(Acc/to The old Parish Churches of South West Wales by Mike Salter 1994.)

The internal whitewashed nave and chancel with a plain round arch between them are Norman like the scalloped font with slight spurs at the base. The small north transept with a pointed tunnel vault and very wide squint is probably 13c.

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

The earliest mention of this benefice is in the time of Bishop Beck, who is stated in the Statutes of St. Davids to have purchased from Vachan ap Eedmor ap Philip, for one mark of silver, all the interest which the latter had in certain lands in the vill of Llanhowell, together with one fourth part of the advowson of the church there. The date of the union of this church with Llandeloy is unknown, but it is quite possible that it occurred soon after 1302 when Bishop David Martin appropriated both churches to the Chapter of St. Davids Cathedral. It is certain, however, that these livings were united in 1490, and continued so until 1907.

Under the name of "Ecclesia de Lanowel," this church assessed at £6 for tenths to the king in 1291 the sum payable being 12s. — (Taxatio.)

For extracts from the Valor Eccl., and other notes see under Llandeloy.

The accounts in 1490 of William Waryn, Communadus of the Cathedral of St. Davids, show that at that date the tithes of Llanhowell and Llandeloy were leased to Henry ap Owen, at the yearly rent of £8. On 23 Sept., 1550, these tithes were leased to George Constantine and Thomas Lee, and on 4 Oct., 1555, Alexander Watkins obtained a lease of the tithes for 50 years at a rent of £11 to commence from the termination of the lease to Constantine and Lee. Presumably this lease was either surrendered or else did not take effect, as in 1565 the tithes were leased to Mr. George Pynde of Haverfordwest for 21 years. On 27 July, 1600, Morgan Bowen of Roblington, gent., took the tithes for 21 years at a yearly rent of £11. Thomas Picton seems to have been the next person to rent the tithes of these churches, but the date of his lease is not given, and in 1625 William Bouren held the tithes. In 1631 they were rented to William Thomas at £11 per annum, and in Nov., 1660, Phoebe Prichard of Poyston, spinster, leased the tithes for 21 years. This lease must have been surrendered, as on 26 July, 1662, she obtained a lease of the tithes for 21 years at the yearly rent of £15, for which she paid a fine of £20, and on 27 July, 1668, she again paid a fine of £20 to extend the lease for 21 years at the same rent. On 26 July, 1680, a lease of the tithes was granted to Rev. John Prichard of Yerbeston, and Elizabeth Prichard of Poyston, spinster, for 21 years at the yearly rent of £15, the fine paid being £40, and in 1687 the same Elizabeth Prichard again took the tithes for 21 years at the same rent. She renewed the lease in 1694 and 1707 at the same rent of £15, and a fine of £20 on each occasion.

In 1726 new tenants appeared in the shape of. John Cooke of Bangeston (the ancestor of Lord Cawdor) and Dame Elizabeth, Viscountess Bulkeley, his wife, who on 24 July, 1733, surrendered the old lease and obtained a new one for 21 years at £15 rent. This new lease was again renewed on 2; July, 1757, for 21 years, by John Hook Campbell, the executor of the late John Hooke, deceased, a fine of £79 being paid for the privilege. On 27 July, 1771, the tithes were leased for 21 years to William Jones of Llether, in the parish of Brawdy, William Davies of Barry Island, in the parish of Llanrhian, and Henry John, of Carwen, in the parish of Whitchurch in Dewsland, who had obtained a surrender of a lease granted to John Campbell Hooke in 1764, the fine paid on this occasion being £60. William Jones of Llether subsequently assigned his interest in the lease to his co-lessee, and they, on 25 July, I786, obtained a new lease for 21 years at a rent of £15, on paying a fine of £7. Henry , John, one of the lessees, died in 1791, and on 24 July, 1794, his personal representative, Francis John of Carvarchell, and William Davies of Barry Island, surrendered the previous leases and obtained a new one for 21 years at the same rent, for which they paid a fine of £16. This lease was again renewed to the same lessees on 1779, on the same terms, the fine paid being £60.

In 1801 the same William Davies and Francis John leased from the Chapter two-thirds of the tithes of Llanhowell and Llandeloy for 21 years at the yearly rent of £15, the fine paid being £200, and on 22 Aug., 1809, Francis John alone rented two-thirds of the same tithes for 21 years at a rent at £13 19s, the fine on this occasion being; £80. In 1820 the same proportion of the tithes was leased to William Davies of Haverfordwest, and Francis of Llandeloy parish, for 21 years at a fine of £42 7s. 1d., and a yearly rent of £14, and this lease was renewed to them at the same fine and rent in 1821, and again in 1825, the fine on the last occasion being £34 5s.

On 25 July, 1833, Francis Cohn was dead, as on that date his executor, Thomas John, and his co-lessee, William Davies, are stated to have paid £34 1s. 8d. to the Chapter, being a portion of the fine for renewing the lease of the tithes of Llanhonvell and Llandeloy.

For list of early vicars of Llanhowell, see under Llandeloy.

The vicarage of Llanhowell was disunited from Llandeloy under an Order in Council dated II May, I906., and, by an Order in Council on 26 March, I907, a portion of the parish of St. Davids with the chapel of ease of St. James the Great, Carnhedryn, was annexed to Llanhowell, the Rev. Hugh Evans being the first vicar of the united churches of Llanhowell and Carnhedren.

For further information on the Parish see:-

(A History of the Church and parish of Llanhowell.  - Richard Morvan Jenkins.)

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Llanllawer (Llanhawer)     (987360)

(Acc/to the topograpical Dictionary of Wales - S. Lewis 1834.)

Llanllawer a parish in the hundred of Kemmes county of Pembroke 3 miles E. SE. from Fishguard containing 123 inhabitants. This parish is pleasantly situated in the northern part of the county and on the river Gwayn, which falls into Fishguard bay. It is only of small extent, and nearly one-third is mountainous, the remainder being enclosed and cultivated. The surrounding scenery is finely varied, combining features of picturesque beauty with mountains of rugged aspect; and the distant views extend over a remarkably interesting tract of country. Court house, in this parish, the seat of Mrs Gwynne is a good family mansion, occupying a pleasant situation.

The living is a rectory not in charge, annexed to that of Llanerchllwydog in the archdeaconry of Cardigan and diocese of St Davids The church is not remarkable for any architectural details. On the side of Llanllawer mountain which terminates in a rocky point, and hence called the Maiden Breast, numerous Druidical relics and carneddau are profusely scattered which supposed to have been places of ancient sepulchre and adjoining is a natural well formerly in high repute for its efficacy in the cure of ague and other diseases, but now neglected. The average annual expenditure for the support of the poor is £38 9s.

Church St David

Tiny church in prehistoric stone ring, strangely marked stone used as lintel to doorway has a fish inscribed on it acc/to Roger Worsley he believes 2nd C.

Church largely rebuilt in 1859. There is a holy well also used a cursing well (only 2 exist in Wales). Two 7c stones with a Latin cross used as gateposts to churchyard

Nearby Neolithic cromlechs and standing stones and the Parc y Meirw stone alignments.

(Acc/to The old Parish Churches of South West Wales by Mike Salter 1994.)

The church has been rebuilt but has at one corner a "weeping stone" ie. a spring said to never run dry.

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

This benefice, originally a chapel, has always been appendant to the barony of Kemes, and in 1594 it was annexed to Llanychllwyddog chapel. - (Owen's Pem.)

No valuation of this benefice is given in the Valor Eccl., and Bacons Liber Regis contains only the following brief reference under the heading 'Not in Charge':- Llanllawer Chapel.

The earliest institution to Llanllawer of which there is record is of Peter Lewis, who also held Llanychllwydog. From that date all subsequent incumbents held both benefices.

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Llanreithan St Reithan SM 865284

(Acc/to the Topographical Dictionary of Wales - S. Lewis 1834.)

Llanreithan, a parish in the hundred of Dewisland, county of Pembroke 4 miles NE by E from Solva containing 141 inhabitants. This parish, which derives its name from the dedication of its Church, is pleasantly situated in the north western part of the county and comprises some fertile tracts of land, which are enclosed and in a good state of cultivation. The surrounding scenery, though in general pleasing, is not distinguished by any peculiarity from that which prevails generally in this part of the principality. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the archdeaconry and diocese of St David's endowed with £800 royal bounty and £200 parliamentary grant, and in the patronage of the Subchanter and Minor Chapter of the cathedral church of St David's to whom the tithes of the parish are appropriated. The average annual expenditure for the support of the poor is £64 15.

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

This benefice seems to have been at a very early date in the patronage of the Bishop of St. Davids. A statute of Bishop Richard de Carew states that Bishop Thomas Wallensis, who occupied the see in 1248-1256, granted to each deacon vicar choral of St. David's Cathedral an annual stipend of two marks, and each subdeacon vicar choral 20s. yearly (besides the small tithes and half of the produce [proventus] of the church of Llanrheithan), and this grant was confirmed by Bishop Richard Carew.— Menev

In 1594 the living is described as a curacy, of which the vicars choral of St. Davids' Cathedral were the rectors. — (Owen's Pem.)

No particulars of this living are given in the Valor Eccl., but the following information is given under the heading 'Not in Charge,' in Bacons Liber Regis:- Llanrhythian arias.

Llanrheithan V. (St. Rheanus). Vicars Choral of St. Davids Patr. and Impr. £4 certified value.

Prior to Dec., 1727, the tithes of Llanrheithan and Manorowen were held on lease by Thomas Jones of Brawdy, at the annual rent of £20, and on the 1st of that month he renewed the lease at the increased rent of £29, but the Lower Chapter agreed to provide curates for the two parishes. About the year 1740 the Rev. John Edwardes then subchantor of the cathedral, obtained a a lease for lives of the tithes of the same two parishes and on the death of Mrs. Barlow of Rosepool, Pems., one of the lives in the lease, Mr. Frands Edwardes (the son and one of the executors of Rev. John Edwardes, the lessee) applied to the Lower Chapter for the insertion of a new life in the lease. This request was refused, but the Lower Chapter offered, if the old lease were surrendered to grant him a lease for 21 years renewable during the lives of the majority of the then vicars choral, on payment of a fine of 24 guineas. This offer was deleted, and presumably the lessee continued to hold the tithes until his lease expired. The next mention of a letting occurs in 1828, when Johnny Harding Harries [of Trevacoa, Pems.] paid a fine of £180 for renewing the lease of the tithes of Llanrheithan and Manorowen. Nov., 1843, the same lessee paid £255 as a fine for renewing the lease and in 1857 a fine of £225 was paid by the same tenant for a renewal. For the last time the lease was renewed on 27 Jan., 1872, by George Harries of Rickeston, Pems., eldest son of John Harding Harries, the last lessee.

The curacy of Llanrheithan was united to the vicarage of Llanrhian by an Order in council on I3 Aug. 1877. On 11th May, 1906 these two benefices were disunited under an Order in Council. On 26 Mar., I907, an Order in Council was obtained uniting Llanreithan with the vicarage of Llandeloy.

(Acc/to The old Parish Churches of South West Wales by Mike Salter 1994.)

Only a Norman font survives in the church which was rebuilt in 1858.

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Llanrhian             (819314)

Church St Rhian part dates from 13c rebuilt 1836 and 1891 font 15c decagonal has one panel with coat of arms of Rhys ap Thomas - on north side of tower incised 7c stone.

(Acc/to the Topographical Dictionary of Wales - S. Lewis 1834.)

Llanrian a parish in the hundred of Dewisland county of Pembroke 5 miles NE from St David's containing 715 inhabitants. This parish is situated near the NW extremity of the county and on the coast of St George's channel by which it is bounded on the west and north; the surrounding scenery is pleasing and the views over the channel and the adjacent country are interesting and extensive. It constitutes a prebend in the cathederal church of St David's, rated in the king's books at £19 9s 7d. and annexed to the archdeaconry of Carmarthen. The living is a discharged vicarage in the archdeaconry and diocese of st David's, rated in the king's books at £6 1s 3d. endowed with £200 royal bounty and £600 parliamentary grant, and in the patronage of the Bishop of St David's The church dedicated to St Rheanus, is not remarkable for any architectural details of importance. There are places of worship for Baptists and Calvinistic Methodists. Near the church are some Druidical remains, consisting of many large stones, most of which are now broken; they were formerly erected, and, in their arrangement and general appearance, formed in miniature, according to Mr Fenton, a tolerable correct representation of Stonehenge. The average annual expenditure for the support of the poor is £264.

(Acc/to The Pembrokeshire Coast National Park by Dillwyn Miles.)

The stepped gables and pitched roof of the tower of the church give it the appearance of a stronghold. The rest was rebuilt in 1836, and restored extensively in 1891. Complaints about the dilapidation of the chancel were made in the early part of the 15c. The church is dedicated to an unknown saint Rhian or Rheian. The decagonal font has an inverted shield on each face, one of which bears a chevron between three ravens, the arms of Sir Rhys ap Thomas, whose descendants lived at nearby Rickeston.

(Acc/to The old Parish Churches of South West Wales by Mike Salter 1994.)

The nave and the west tower (except for the stepped gables to the north and south) are 13c. The chancel is Victorian. The transepts may be post -Reformation.

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

Llanrhian Church appears to have been in the patronage of the Bishop from the earliest date.

In 1291 this church was assessed at £16 for tenths to the King, the amount payable being £1 12s. - (Taxatio.)

Llanryan Vicaria:—Johannes Adam clericus tenet vicariam ibidem sibi perpetuam ex collacione episcopi Menevensis F,t valent fructus ejusdem ecclesie de tercia parte omnium frugum et aliorum emolimentorum per annum vja xiujS iiin4. Inde in visitacione archidiaconi quolibet anno pro sinodalibus ibidem xxiijd. Et remanet clare £6 11s 5d. Inde decima 13s- 1d. - (Valor Eccl.)

Under the heading 'Livings Discharged':- Uanrian alias Llan Rhiain V. (St. Rheanus). Visit. quolibet tertio anno 1S. IIL Val. in tertia parte omn. fruct. per ann. Archdeacon of Carmarthen Impr. Bishop of St. Davids. Clear yearly value £29. King's Books £6 1s. 3d. - (Bacon's Liber Regis.)

On 15 June, 1891, a faculty was granted for the restoration of Llanrhian Church.

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Llanstinan             (954339)

Church St Justinian. Ancient celtic church within a circular churchyard - restored 1800's.

(Acc/to the Topographical Dictionary of Wales - S. Lewis 1834.)

Llanstinan a parish in the hundred of Dewisland county of Pembroke 2 1/2 miles SbyW from Fishguard, containing 168 inhabitants. The name appears to be derived by contraction from the name of the saint (Justinian) to whom the church is dedicated. The parish is pleasantly situated near the source of the Western Cleddy river, by which it is separated from that of Fishguard, and comprises a large portion of enclosed arable and pasture land; the surrounding scenery is pleasingly varied and the views from the higher ground embrace extensive prospects over the adjacent country which abounds with interesting features. The ancient mansion of the family of Symmons, which had been suffered to remain in a neglected state for some time, has been modernized or rebuilt, and is now the handsome seat of Col Owen, eldest son of Sir John Owen Bart., lord -lieutenant of the county. The turnpike road from Haverfordwest to Fishguard passes through the parish. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the archdeaconry and diocese of St David's endowed with £600 royal bounty and £200 parliamentary grant, and in the patronage of Sir John Owen Bart., who is lessee of the tithes under the subchanter in the cathedral church of St David's. The church is not distinguished by any interesting architectural details. The annual average expenditure for the support of the poor is £50 4.

(Acc/to The old Parish Churches of South West Wales by Mike Salter 1994.)

The narrow chancel and south transept with a squint are covered with pointed tunnel vaults. Probably the walls are 13c, the chancel arch being a plain pointed opening, but the few narrow windows are all of later date. The font is Norman.

From Mrs Eastham's brief history of the church:

This little church has the only known pre-conquest foundation dedicated to St Stinian or Justinian, believed to have been the friend and spiritual companion of our patron St David in the sixth century. Built within a Llan of earlier date it consists of a nave and Chancel with an enlarged squint linking the south transept to the chancel, a feature believed to have been associated in Pembrokeshire with hermitic use. It is constructed mainly of Preseli stone with some local slate and a change in the masonry from the lower to upper courses of the walls indicates where the original church was rebuilt in the Middle ages. A Gothic window at the east end of the sanctuary was replaced in the 18c by a square stained glass one, in domestic style, when the other windows in the church, two in the chancel, two in the nave, and one in the south transept were installed. These too are all domestic in style and of three separate designs. At the same time a staircase from behind the pulpit to an upper level above the nave appears to have been ripped out. A change in the structure which was probable associated with alterations in the level of the roof. There is a nice early font and of the two memorials inside the church, one is dedicated to the Rev. Henry Miles, a very long serving vicar and his wife and the other to little Fanny Owen who died at two months old in 1835. There are Long-eared bats in the rafters and a variety of fern species find foothold in the ancient walls. Isolated today, the churchyard was once the centre of the village of Scleddau, which appears beside it on George Owen's map of 1603. Outlines may be seen in the field of the houses and cottages and there are Rambler roses in the hedgerows. The remains of the old school lay inside the ancient enclosure, beside it and away from the memorials to local families, a pair of rough-hewn bluestones, one inscribed T. O. record two local suicides of the 19th century.

(Acc/to the Shedule of Ancient Monuments.)

Castell - This is a circular enclosure about 500 yds south of the parish church. The only portion of the surrounding bank which still remains has a height of 6 feet, with a drop of 10 feet to a ditch now about 4 feet deep. The entire work is hidden by dense undergrowth, and the rampart to the north and west has disappeared. Apparently the entrance was to the east. The enclosure had a diameter of about 220 feet. The field on which it stands is known as Parc y Castell. Visited 22 June 1915.

Y Gaer Penbicas - About 300 yards west of Penbicas house and standing on a field still known as Y Gaer are the slight remains of an earthwork. The south eastern part of the bank has been levelled, but the remaining portion for a length of 270 feet is fairly intact. The bank rises to a height of 5 feet and falls 11 feet to an external ditch which is hardly perceptible. The site is amost hidden by gorse - Visited 18 June 1915.

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

This church was appropriated by Bishop David Martin on 22 Feb., 1302, to Martin Robert de Trefdn, the precentor’s vicar, to be annexed to the subchantorship of St. Davids Cathedral in perpetuity, but reserving to the Bishop and his successors the right to present a perpetual curate to the church, and also a suitable provision for such curate out of the tithes of Llanstynan. — (Stat. Menev.)

The sub-chantors of St. Davids Cathedral were the rectors of Llanstinan. — (Owen's Pem.)

In 1291 this church was assessed at £5 6s. 8d. for tenths to the King, the sum payable being Ins. 8d. — (Taxatio.)

No valuation of this benefice is given in the Valor Eccl., which, however, states that the college of St. Mary near the cathedral of St. Davids received from the church of Llanstinan £4 13s. 4d. per annum.

Under the heading 'Not in charge':— Llanstinan Cur. (St. Justinian). Subchantor of St. Davids Patr. £4 certified value. — (Bacon's Liber Regis.)

Under the District Church Tithes Act of 1865, this benefice was, by an instrument dated 20 Dec., 1866, made into a rectory.

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Llantood     155419

Bellcote church rebuilt in 1884 dedicated to St Illtyd

14c cross slab on the west wall of the nave

(Acc/to The Monasticm Order in South Wales 1066-1348  - F. G. Cowley.)

St Dogmael's priory was founded by Robert fitz Martin 1113 or 1115 it became an abbey 1120.

Among the appropriated Churches was Llantood valued at £4 0s 0d.

Since the dissolution of that house, it has been in the patronage of the crown.

Under the name 'Ecclesia de Langetot,' this church was in 1291 assessed at £4 for tenths to the King. — (Taxatio.)

Lantsyd:— Vicaria ibidem ex co11acione dicti abbatis [de St. Dogmaele] unde Thomas Lloid est vicarius et valet per annum 46s. 8d. Inde decima 4s. 8d. - (Valor. Eccl.)

The vicarage of Llantood appears to have been united to the benefices of Monington and St. Dogmaels as far back as 1624; at all events the three vicarages have been held down to the present date by the same incumbent

On 10 April, 1883, a faculty was issued for the restoration of Llantood Church.

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Llantyd

(Acc/to the Topographical Dictionary of Wales. - S. Lewis 1834.)

Llantyd - (Llan - Illtyd), a parish in the hundred of Kilgerran, county of Pembroke 3 miles SW by S from Cardigan containing 281 inhabitants. This parish derives its name from the dedication of its church to St Illtyd, an eminent teacher of Christianity who died about the close of the 5th century. It is pleasantly situated in the NE part of the county near the separation of two great roads leading respectively from Cardigan to Fishguard and Haverfordwest and comprises a large tract of arable and pasture land of which the whole is enclosed. The surrounding scenery though not distinguished by any peculiarity of feature is generally pleasing and the views over the adjacent country are agreeably diversified. The living is a vicarage not in charge, annexed with that of Monington or Eglwys Wythwr, to the vicarage of St Dogmael's in the archdeaconry of Cardigan and diocese of St David's endowed with £200 royal bounty. The church is not distinguished by any architectural details of importance. John Jones in 1729 bequeathed a small sum of money towards the relief of poor persons of this parish not receiving parochial aid, the interest of which is annually distributed according to the will of the testator. The average annual expenditure for the support of the poor is £77 18s.

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Llanvyrnach

(Acc/to the Topographical Dictionary of Wales. - S. Lewis 1834.)

A parish in the hundred of Kemmes, county of Pembroke 8 Miles SW from Newcastle-Emlyn containing 979 inhabitants. This parish, which derives its name from the dedication of the church is situated in the NE part of the county, bordering upon Carmarthenshire and comprises an extensive tract of land of which the greater portion is enclosed and cultivated. The surrounding scenery though not characterized by any peculiarity of feature is generally pleasing and in some instances picturesque. The soil though inferior in fertility to that of other parts of the county is not unproductive. An extensive common, connected with Precelly mountain, rises to the west of the village but an enclosure of land was made in the parish a few years ago. On the banks of the river Taf and at no great distance from its source, are some extensive lead mines, which were formerly worked with great success but for some years the works have been suspended. The living is a discharged rectory in the archdeaconry of Cardigan and diocese of St David's rated in the king’s books at £10 and in the patronage of the King as Prince of Wales.

The church dedicated to St Brynach is not remarkable for any architectural details of importance. There are places of worship for Baptists and Presbyterians.

On the common above the church are four large erect stones, visible at a great distance, marking out, according to tradition, the graves of two chieftains who were slain in a desperate battle which is said to have been fought near the spot; and near the church is a large tumulus which is supposed to have been surmounted by a castle or fort to defend the pass. There are several mineral springs within the parish but their peculiar properties have not been ascertained. The average annual expenditure for the maintenance of the poor is £194 9s.

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Llanwnda         933395

Llanwnda. A fascinating hamlet with a boulder-strewn rough "village green" (with remnants of stone circles on it?) and a simple unpretentious bellcote church. There has been a church here since early Christian times, and Asser the friend of King Alfred, was educated here. There are a number of inscribed stones in the vicinity, and prehistoric remains are abundant. There is a suggestion that the village green may have remains of a stone circle on it.

Church St Gwyndaf - small bellcoted church with strange severed head wooden carvings on the roof beams. Giraldus Cambrensis held living in 12c. It was restored in 1870's.

There has been a church on the site since pre Norman days the monk Asser later an adviser to King Alfred and co founder of Oxford University, was educated here.

Outside the church there is an incised Dark Ages grave slab with what appears to be a head, there are also inscribed stones from c600AD, a Holy well and Pilgrims crosses.

Neolithic burial Chamber.

(Acc/to The Pembrokeshire Coast National Park by Dillwyn Miles.)

The Church serves the wide headland of Pen-caer with its scattered farmsteads farmsteads and cottages. It has a double bellcote and sanctus. There are 5 cross incised stones built into the exterior wall of the church, one of which has a stylised human face. During the French invasion of 1797 a French Officer stole the chalice and, when trying to sell it in Carmarthen said that he had brought it from France and that the inscription LANVNDA was a rendering or La Vendée. Below is the rugged coastline of Pen-caer, a peninsular having many prehistoric remains including burial chambers at Garnwen, Penrhiw, Garnwnda and Garn Gyllwch, and an Iron Age fort on Garn Fawr. The French landed at Carreg Wastad on this coast.

(Acc/to The old Parish Churches of South West Wales by Mike Salter 1994.)

Much of the church is of 1881. The north aisle containing a rood-loft staircase and porch are both vaulted. Features of interest are the two piscinae, the crosses on the chancel walls and the head of a priest on a 15c roof beam.

Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.

The church of Lanwodaf [Llanwnda]with its appurtenances was granted by Bishop Anselm to the Chapter of St. Davids Cathedral, and this grant was confirmed by Bishop Reginald Brien on 18 May, 1352. — (Stat. Menev.)

Described as 'Llanuda,' this church was in 1291 assessed at £16 for tenths to the king, the sum payable being £1 12s. — (Taxatio.)

Llannanda Vicaria:--Grifiinus Roger vicarius per-petuus ibidem habet altileg' et oblaciones dicte ecclesie que valent in toto singulis annis lxvjs viijd inde sol' in ordinatia visitacione quolibet tercio anno xiiijd ob. Item in visitacione quolibet anno pro sinodalibus iiijd. Et remarket dare 65s. 1d. Inde decima 6s. 6d. - (Valor Eccl.)

On 10 July, 1656, an order was made by the Trustees for the maintenance of Ministers under the Commonwealth, granting to Adam Hawkins, the successor of the late Stephen Love at St. Mary's. Haverfordwest, £16 5s. from the tithes of Llanwnda.

Under the beading 'Livings Discharged':—Llanwnda V. (St. Wnda). Visit. quolibet tertio anno, 1s. 2id. Syn. quolibet anno, 4d. Habet altareg. and oblat. Chantor and Chapter of St. Davids Patr. and Impr. Clear yearly value, £14. King's Books, £3 5s. 2d. - (Bacon's Liber Regis.)

The accounts for the year 1490 of William Waryn, the Communarius of the Cathedral, shows that the tithes of Llausvnda were then leased to Master Thomas ap Howell, at the yearly rent of £8, payable to the Chapter, and £8 to the vicar of the church. On 2 July, 1550 a lease of the tithes and the advowson of the vicarage was granted for 40 years to Arnold Butler of Janston [Johnston] Pems., at a rent of £16, which included the vicar's stipend, and on 28 July, 1565, a lease of the rectory of Llanwnda (the vicarage excepted) was granted for 4 years at the same rent to Gellie Mericke of South Hooke, Pems., gent., the term to commence at the termination of the previous lease given to Arnold Butler. In 1626 John Mericke of Monkton Pems., Esq., obtained a lease of the tithes for 21 years, at a rent of £16 for which he paid a fine of £66 6s. 8d. and in this instance the advowson of the vicarage was reserved to the Chapter.

On 25 July, 1668, the Chapter granted a lease of the rectorial tithes of Llanwnda to William Wogan, of Grays Inn, Middlesex, Esq., and Dame Elizabeth Jacob (the widow of Sir John Jacob, of the City of London, Knt., and Bart, deceased) who in or about that year married her co-lessee, the term granted being for the lives of the two lessees and of Hugh Wogan, gent., the youngest brother of William Wogan, the reserved rent being £16.

According to Canon Payne's MS., Sir William Wogan, judge of the Great Sessions for the three counties, obtained in 1697 a lease for 21 years of the tithes, the refit being raised to £24, but in this case the stipend of the vicar was paid by the Chapter. On 25 July 1704, William Wogan [of Llanstinan, the nephew of the previous lessee] obtained a renewal of the lease, for 21 years at the same rent, and this lease was renewed in July, 1734, for 21 years at £15 6s 8d rent, by John Symons of Llanestinan, who inherited the property of his uncle, William Wogan. On 26 July, 1749, John Symons paid a fine is of £66 5s. to renew the lease for another 21 years, and in July, 1770 he paid another fine of £105 to renew the lease for 21 years.

On 4 June, 1881, a faculty was obtained for the restoration of Llanwnda Church.

Browne Willis in his Paroch Wall mentions two chapels, called Capel Degan and Llanwnewr, as subordinate to Llanwnda, the former being dedicated to St. Degan and the latter to St. Gwynswr. Referring to Capel Degan, Fenton's Pems. says, "Upon the edge of a cliffe overhanging a small creek in this parish are the almost obliterated remains of a chapel dedicated to St. Tegan or Degan."

The site of Llanwnewr Chapel was evidently in or close to the yard of the farm of that name, and it is clear from the large number of graves that have been found in the farmyard that the chapel must have been of some considerable importance. As described a few years ago to the writer by the occupant of the farm, the sides of the graves were formed of flag-stones set an edge, and covered by one or more flag-stones. It was quite a common event, he added, for an animal to break through into a grave.

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Llanycefn - Dedication unknown         (SN 097237)

(RCAM Pembroke 1914 No 599.)

This small church was renovated in 1904 when the chancel and west wall were rebuilt. It consists of a chancel, nave and bell-cote above the west gable. The tower which fell many years ago was part of the old church. The Chancel arch is a low round-headed opening. There are remains of rood stairs and the door leading thereto also a small squint.

(Acc/to The old Parish Churches of South West Wales by Mike Salter 1994.)

The church was rebuilt in 1904, a tower having been removed, the font may be 15c.

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

Described as 'Ecclesia de Eevyn,' this church was assigned in 1287 by Bishop Thomas Beck as an endowment for the Hospital of [St. Mary] Llawhaden, but in 1501 Bishop John Morgan granted the hospital or chapel of Llawhaden, together with the church of Kevyn appropriated to the said hospital, to the use of the choristers of St. Davids Cathedral, who were to provide a suitable chaplain to serve the said hospital and church.—Stat. Menev On the dissolution of the monastic houses the church and the tithes of Llanycefn seem to have come into the hands of the Crown, and were subsequently sold to the Stepney family of Prendergast, and afterwards came into the hands of Lord Milford. In 1631 the inhabitants of Llanycefn and Egremont Chapel petitioned the Commonwealth for an augmentation for their minister, who had but £13 6s. 8d. from the tithes of the church, worth £28, which were held by Sir John Stepney of Prendergast, Bart and in 1649 Sir John was ordered to settle £70 as an augmentation of these livings, and those of Little Newcastle and Clarbeston. - (Compound papers.)

I,ibera Cape la Dive Marie de Lanhaden, Llanvkevvn, et al in una mita, videlicet, Libeta Capella Dive Slalie de Llanhaden, Llanskevyn, Moucketon, et Egermont in una unita unde Thomas Lange clerieus est custos, et magister ex oliaciane Episcopi Menevensis valent in omnibus exitikus oblacionibus fructibus et emoAumentis communibus n lais vjU xiijH iiijd. Inde sol' qttolibet tertio anno irt visitaione ordinaria via ob'. Et in visitacione archidiacOni quoZibet anno pro sinodalibus et plonwaci-onibus dictarutn iiijer capellarum ut in preceden} xiije xd. Et remanet clare 117s. 11d. Inde decinta 11S. 9d. — (Valor Eccl.)

There is no separate valuation of this benefice in the Valor Eccl. It was at that time united with the free chapel of St. Mars, Llaw-haden, Menckton [by Nar-berth], and Egremont. No mention appears to be made of it in Bacon's Liber Regis.

On 7 June, 1904, a faculty was granted for the rebuilding of Llanycefn Church.

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Llanychaer             (992345)

Bellcote church, rebuilt 1871, dedicated to St David. 7-9c memorial in churchyard.

(Acc/to The old Parish Churches of South West Wales by Mike Salter 1994.)

A Norman font remains in a church of 1876.

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

Apparently this rectory has always been appendant to the manor of Llanychaer; at all events it was so in 1594, when Owen Johnes was the patron. — (Owen's Pem.)

Described as Ecclesia de Launerwayth, this church was in 1291 assessed at £4 6s. 8d. for tenths to the King. — (Taxatio.)

Llanuchaieth:—Ecclesia ibidem ex presentacione pat-ronorum ibidern unde Philippus Adam clericus est rector valet communibus annis 66s. 8d. Inde decima 6s. 8d. — (Valor Eccl.)

Under the heading "Livings Discharged":—Llanichaith alias Llanychaeth (St. David). John Vaughan, 1728; Thomas Warren, Esq., 1729; Thomas Williams, Esq. and Anne his wife, 1762. Clear yearly value, £13. King's Books, £3 6s. 8d. - (Bacons Liber Regis.)

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Llanychlwydog     St David  [alt spell Llanychllwydog]

(Acc/to the Topographical Dictionary of Wales 1834 - S. Lewis.)

Llanerchllwydog, a parish in the hundred of Kemmes county of Pembroke 4 miles ESE from Fishguard containing 169 inhabitants. This place derives its name from Clydawe, one of the reguli of the county, by whom, according to Mr Fenton, the church was originally founded, and who, while pursuing the diversion of the chase in this vicinity was treacherously murdered and afterwards interred in the churchyard. The parish is romantically situated on the river Gwayn, which, after pursuing a NW course falls into Fishguard bay; it comprises a large tract of land which, with the exception of a mountainous district is wholly enclosed and in a good state of cultivation. The surface is finely undulating and the surrounding scenery is pleasingly diversified and in some parts highly picturesque.

The living is a discharged rectory, with that of Llanllawer annexed in the archdeaconry of Cardigan and dioceseof Bangor, rated in the kings books at £8 and in the patronage of Thomas Lloyd Esq. The church dedicated to St David is not distinguished by any architectural details of importance; in the churchyard are two upright stones of great antiquity which are supposed to mark the grave of Clydawe. There are places of worship for Baptists and Calvanistic Methodists. The average annual expenditure for the maintenance of the poor is £56 1s.

(Pembrokeshire and its Antiquities Arch. Camb. 3rd Series 1859.)

The plan of the church consisted of a nave, chancel, and south aisle with a broad squint from the chancel to the transept. There was a stone altar on the south side of the chancel arch, the north side is occupied by a pulpit, but probably on the site of a second altar.

This church once combined with Morvil and Pontfaen has been entirely rebuilt and is now combined with Llanllawer.

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

This rectory was originally appendant to the barony of Kemes In 1326 the advowson of the church of "Lan-verloydauk in Wales" valued at 12 marks, with other advowsons and knights fees, was assigned to James de Audele, kinsman and co-heir of William, son of William Eartyn [Lord of Kemes] - (Close Rolls.) In 1594 LlanYth-lluyddog Church was still appendant to the barony of Remes. - (Owens Pems.)

In 1291 the church of Lannewlogdak cum cappela was assessed at £8 for tenths to the King. - (Taxatio.)

Llanuchlloidok:—-Ecclesia ibidern ex collacione domini de Avvdeley unde Philipps Propert clericus est rector valet conmlunibus annis £8. Inde decima r6s. - (Valor Eccl.)

Under the heading "Livings Discharged":— Llanerch-lwydog alias Llanychloydog alias Llanchellodovock alias Llanydoythog (St. David) and Llanllitwer. Dom. de Audley olim Patzr.; William Laugharnel Esq., 1718, and William Lloyd, Esq., Lord of Keavs; Thomas Lloyd. Esq., and Amie, his wife, 1758; John Bateman, Esq., 1784. Clear yearlv value, £32. King's Books, £8.— (Bacons Liber Regis.)

In the parish of Llanychllwvddog was formerly a pilgrimage chapel, called Llanmerchen. It is mentioned in a list of chapels, most of which were in ruins before 1613. — (Owen's Pem., Pt. 2, p. 521.)

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Llawhaden         (070174).

This is an old frontier settlement, located close to the Landsker. The castle was a fortified Bishop's residence, strongly sited and further protected by a moat. Earlier a ring motte had been built here, which was mentioned by Giraldus Cambrensis, but destroyed by Rhys ap Gruffudd in 1193. It had been built inside prehistoric earthworks

Today Llawhaden is little more than a pleasant village lying on the west bank of the Eastern Cleddau River, but during the 13th and 14th centuries it functioned as an important and sizeable borough under the control of the bishops of St David's.

The creation of the borough is associated with the building of the Bishop's palace on the site of the earlier motte, by Bishop Bek in the period 1280-93. The church of St Aidan by the river, together with the early mill, were also standing at this time but no details are known of any associated settlement.

A weekly market on Mondays and two annual fairs were granted in 1281 and a start was made on laying out the town on the level ground which runs westwards from the castle. It seems likely that the old church was also rebuilt at this time, while in 1287, just beyond the western limits of the borough, the bishop founded a hospital for the poor and aged. Some remains of the building, now badly overgrown can still be seen in Chapel Field.

The first burgesses at Llawhaden appear in 1292, the number grew rapidly, and by 1326 the town housed 174 1/2 burgages held by 126, predominantly English, burgesses.

It was easily the most important of the bishopric's boroughs, even surpassing St David's, and the palace was the principal Episcopal residence, where courts were also held and felons imprisoned.

While Llawhaden is now completely lacking in any urban character and the former burgage plots difficult to discern, it seems reasonable to assume that the medieval borough lay along the road leading from the castle with its westernmost limit represented by the hospital which, since it also served as a leper house, must have been on the outskirts. In view of the large number of burgages recorded in1326, however, which could not all have been accommodated along this stretch other areas must have been built up, and it is probable that plots also lined the now overgrown roadway which leads from the decayed market square down to the bridge, where the remains of several dwellings are still detectable amidst the overgrowth. The settlement does not appear to have been defended, and although the Black book records the rents for buildings infra muros, these are likely to have been on the episcopal demesne lands to the south of the castle which were enclosed with formidable stone walls, sections of which are still standing.

Almost nothing is known of the later history of Llawhaden beyond references to the castle. During the revolt of Owain Glyndwr Henry IV ordered it to be re-fortified in case of attack, but it was eventually dismantled during the episcopacy of Bishop Barlow, 1536-47. The 16th century also witnessed the dissolution of the hospital and the borough decayed considerably with the weekly market falling into disuse.

Castle was used as a quarry and finally given by the Church to the government and taken over by CADW.

Most of the ruins to be seen today date from the thirteenth century. Down by the river, there is an interesting church dating from the 1380's, and there is a ruined hospitum at the far end of the village. The Old Mill is now a trout farm and the village also has an interesting pottery.

(Acc/to the Topographical Dictionary of Wales 1834 - S. Lewis.)

Lawhaden or Llewhaden, a parish in the hundred of Dungleddy, county of Pembroke 3 1/2 miles NNW from Narberth containing 657 inhabitants. This place which derives its name from the dedication of its church to St Aidan Bishop of Lindisfarne, who died in the year 651, was for many years distinguished as the principal episcopal residence of the bishops of St David's, who had a magnificent castle and palace here with a very extensive park and forest of red deer, noticed by Leyland. This truly splendid structure, which was built entirely of hewn stone was the favourite residence of Bishop Beck, who contributed greatly to its embellishment; it was adapted in every respect to the purposes of domestic convenience, and had every appendage of luxury and state. The exact date of its original foundation is not known; but from a deed of feoffment bearing the date 1383, it appears that John Fowley was at that time constable of the castle and master of the board of works to Bishop Hoton, who conveyed to him and to Ellen his wife certain lands in the vicinity, which are now the property of his descendants. In the reign of Henry VIII., Lawhaden castle, together with other Episcopal palaces of this diocese was stripped of its leaden roof by Bishop Barlow, who subsequently availed himself of the dilapidation which he had caused, as a plea for carrying into effect his purpose of transferring the see to Carmarthen. From this period the palace was suffered to fall into decay; but the ruins which are still venerable and majestic in their appearance afford imposing evidence of its pristine grandeur.

The parish comprises a large tract of rich arable and pasture land, which is enclosed and in a good state of cultivation. The village is situated on the summit of a lofty ridge overhanging the river Cleddy, and commands a fine view of the adjacent country, which abounds with richly varied scenery; and within the parish are some highly interesting and pleasingly romantic features, among which are, the church, beautifully situated on the margins of the river, under a richly wooded eminence, and the majestic and venerable ruins of the ancient castle immediately above it. Ridgeway an elegant modern mansion, erected by the late I. H. Foley Esq., and now the residence of his widow, occupying a portion of the lands granted to the ancestor of that gentleman by Bishop Hoton in the year 1383; and in the village is also a good family house belonging to the Skyrmes, whose ancestor accompanied Oliver Cromwell into the principality during the parliamentary war, and obtained a settlement at this place.

This parish constitutes a prebend in the cathedral church of St David's, rated in the king’s book at £17 17s 1d., and annexed to the Chancellorship of the Cathedral by Bishop Beck in 1287. The living is a discharged vicarage with the perpetual curacy of Bletherston annexed in the archdeaconry and diocese of St Davids rated in the kings books at £8 18s 6 1/2d., and in the patronage of the Bishop of St. Davids. The church dedicated to St Aidan is an ancient and venerable edifice with a handsome tower and in its retired and beautiful situation forms an interesting and romantic feature in the scenery around the village. There is a place of worship for Presbyterians. It is in contemplation to establish a National School for the gratuitous instruction of children, in connection with the parent society in London. The remains of the ancient castle form a majestic and venerable ruin crowning the summit of a precipitous eminence, commanding a magnificent and extensive prospect. The site was originally surrounded by a moat, over which was a drawbridge leading to the principal entrance, through a noble gateway defended by two circular towers; this portion of the building is still in a state of tolerable preservation; there are also the remains of two octagonal towers (which appear to have contained state apartments and rooms of residence) of part of a small but very elegant chapel and some portions of the outer walls. Some fragments of the park walls are yet remaining, and the land which they now serve to enclose is some of the very richest in the county. The prevailing character of the architecture is that of the early English style and the ruins have a most beautiful and picturesque appearance from every point of view. On the road side there are the remains of an ancient building covered with ivy which is said to have been founded by Bishop Beck as a hospitium for pilgrims visiting St David’s shrine. Lawhaden castle was the head of the barony in right of which the Bishops of St David's claim their seat in the house of peers. The average annual expenditure for the support of the poor amounts to £155 17s.

(1287 November Foundation charter 1287 of Bishop Beck's hospitium British Museum.)

I [Bishop Thomas Beck] ordain and enact that in the town of Llawhaden, at a place specially appointed by me for the purpose where I have erected an oratory, shall be built a hospital in which pilgrims, orphan paupers, infirm, old and feeble persons and imbecile strangers, and wearied travellers may be entertained.

(Black Book of St David's 1326-7.)

1326 - The Bishop of St David's held a fulling mill worth 20s a year at Llawhaden.

(Acc/to The Pembrokeshire Coast National Park by Dillwyn Miles.)

The Church, which stands on the banks of the Eastern Cleddau, is dedicated to St Aidan of Ferns, and the name of the village Llanaiden has been corrupted to Llawhaden. The castle built by the Bishop's of St David's is entered from the village. A hospice for the use of wayfarers was built by Bishop Beck in 1287, but only a vaulted stone chamber remains. Ridgeway House, now a home for the elderly, was visited by Nelson in 1802, when it was the house of Admiral Sir Thomas Foley.

(Survey of South Wales Chantries 1546 by Evan D. Jones.)

The Parishes of Llanyhadon, Llanykeven, Monkton, and Egermont in the County of Pembroke beforesayd

1] The Frechappelles of Llanyhadon, Llanykeven, Monkton and Egermont

2] Founded to Fynde a Prest for euer And he to haue for his Salary by yere certeyn Tithes & oblacions which amountith yerly to the somme of x.li with viij Acres of land belongyng to the said Chapell of Llanyhadon which is rentid by yere at x.s in all x.li

The said Frechapell of Llanykeven hath cure of sole to the nomber of j.c howseling People & is distant ij myles from Egermont, the Chapell of Monkton hath cure of sole to the nomber of xxv howseling People and is distant from LLanykeven iiij mylesEgermont hath cure of soole to the nomber of xliij howsling People

4] x.li wherof

For the Priest stipend ix.li viij.s ij.d obolus

For the Tenthes x.li

And so Remaynyth nil

5] lxxv.s.

Extent of the Lands of the Bishopric of St David’s 1327 - PRO E 152 No 16

Castrum de Lauwadyn (Llawhaden Castle, Pembs.)

Item, there is there a castle constructed of stone, worth nothing beyond the outlay. A garden worth 12s 9d. 2 carucates of land which be extended because they are worth nothing for tillage, and the pas common. 9 acres of land worth 18d. every third year. There is a meadow worth 5s per annum. There are two mills, one was ZZZ one fulling, farmed at the time of bishops of old at £4 paid at the Feast Clement Pope and St. John Baptist. There are fairs on the Feasts of St. Edward and St. Martin Bishop, worth 3s. per annum. 2 carucates of land valued at 40s. per annum and no more be.

Rents of assize of all tenants at 40s. paid at the Feasts of the Annunciation of BVM, St. John Baptist, and the Nativity of Our Lord.

Pleas and perquisites of court worth 5s. per annum.

Llawhaden Church. St Aidan standing in 1193 rebuilt about 1280 near site of St Aidan's first church. Built into east wall is an ancient cross and a chapel contains the mutilated effigy of Bishop Houghton of St David's (d 1389).

(Acc/to The old Parish Churches of South West Wales by Mike Salter 1994.)

A large new nave and chancel were added in the 14c under the patronage of the Bishop's of St David's. In 1862 the nave was mostly rebuilt, the south doorway being blocked and a west porch added. The original 13c chancel was retained as a south chapel and the original south tower with a stair turret on the west side survives on the south side of the huge lofty new tower raised between it and the new nave. The effigy of a priest lies in a recess in the south chapel, and there is a Norman font. In the village is a lofty vaulted chapel which served a hospital founded by Bishop Beck in 1287. The chapel was dedicated to St Mary, St Thomas and St Edmund.

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

In 1287 the prebend of Llawhaden (in other words the rectory of Llawaden), was granted in perpetuity by Bishop Thomas Beck to the chancellor of St. Davids Cathedral, but the right of presentation to the vicarage appears to have been retained by the Bishop.

So far as can be ascertained, the chapel of Bletherston has been annexed to the vicarage of Llawhaden from the earliest times, and is still united to that living.

There is some question as to the saint to which this church is dedicated. Fenton in his History of Pembrokeshire states that it was dedicated to St. Hugo, apparently basing this view on a grant in 1334 (contained in the Statutes of St. Davids Cathedral) by John Gom, who conveyed certain property to the Precentor and Chapter of St. Davids, subject to certain yearly charges, one of which was the payment of 5 marks to a chaplain to celebrate Mass in the church of St. Hugo, of Lawadeyn. It is, however, much more likely that the church was dedicated to St. Aidan. The name Llairhaden undoubtedly suggests this. It is possible that Hugh and Aidan maybe synonymous names, as Sir John Rhys says that the Old Irish Oedt, later Haodh was anglicised into 'Hugh.' Another suggestion is that the church of St. Hugo may have been a chantry in the church of Llawhaden, or possibly the chapel in Llawhaden Castle.

Under the name, 'Ecclesia Lanwraden, this church was in 1291 assessed at £17 6s. 8d., the tenths payable thereon to the King being £1 14s. 8d. - (Taxatio.)

Lanhaden cum Capella de Bletherston annexata. — Eeclesia ibidem cum capella annexata unde Willelmus Stradl ge clerieus cancellarius Ecclesie cathedralis Mene vensis racione eiusdem dignitatis est ibidem rector es collacione episcopi Menevensis. Et habet ibidem unam mansionem cum terris ortis et pasturis eidem ecclesie pertinen' que voeatur Seynt Canoc et valet per annum i8 ad looznd' - Et fructus et emolimenta ejusdem bene-ficii valent per annum zvj. Inde annuatirn sol' archdiacono Menevensi in visitacione sua pro sinodalibus et procuracionibus v8 ixd. Et quolibet tereio anno in visit-acione ordinaria ij8 ijd ob Et remanet c3 are £17 17s, 0d. Inde decima 3s. 8id

Vicaria ibidem:—Dicta ecclesia parrochialis habet unum vicarium vocatum Morganum ap Walter clericum qui habet tereiam parte1n omnium emolimentorum dicti beneficii domum sive mansionem ibidem cum terris domi-nicalibus ibidem. Et valet proficuus et fructus hujus beneficii l) er annum ixj. Inde solut' in visitacione ordi-nasia quolibet tercio anno xviijd ob. Et rinanet dlge £8 18s. 5d. Inde dffrima 17s. 10d. - (Val Eccl.)

Under the heading 'livings Discharged':—Llahadden alias Uawhadden V. (St. Aidan). Ordinario quolibet tertio anno IS. 6+d. Habet mans. eum part. omn. fruet. Bishop of St. Davids Patr. Chancellor of St. Davids Impr. Clear yearly Value £30. King's Books, £8 18s. 6d. Under the heading ‘Not in Charge’: — Bletherston Chapel to Llahadden.' - (Bacon's Liber Regis.)

On 13 Jan., 1873 a faculty was granted for the removal of the body of Mrs. Mary Anne Jones fiom Llawhaden churchyard to the churchyard of the parish of Llanedy, Carms.

In addition to the Free Chapel of St. Mary, Llawhaden, mentioned below there is said to have been a chapel dedicated to St. Cadoc in the parish. - (Lives of British Saints, Pt. 2, p. 119.)

The rectors of Llawhaden were the chancellors of St. Davids Cathedral;

In close proximitv to the village of Llawhaden was the priory or chapel of St. Mary, founded in 1287 by Bishop Thomas Beck.

(Black book of St David's (Cym) p 138.)

Grant by David Bishop of St Davids of seven carucates of land called Drym, in the vill of Lawhaden, from the demesne, made with a certain daughter of his.

1402

Also on 17 March, in the year of the Lord above-said, the bishop, at Lawaden, granted a dispensation to John Fayreford, rector of the parish church of Lambiliowe of his diocese, deacon, according to the chapter Cum en so. And he had the necessary letters etc.

Cadw Guidebook.

Llawhaden Castle: 10 miles east of Havorfordwest, Pembrokeshire, south Wales.

Gerald of Wales visited his uncle, Bishop David fitz Gerald at Llawhaden about 1175, he described it as a castle. It was already a site of great importance to the bishops of St Davids, and lay at the center of some of their richest estates. Standing on a commanding spur above the Eastern Cleddau, in finely wooded country, the great oval ditch survives from the early stronghold visited by Gerald. In 1192, however, the defences were largely destroyed during a Welsh uprising. Following its recovery by the bishops, Llawhaden may have been rebuilt in stone during the 13th century, but it was not until the beginning of the 14th century that the castle was reconstructed on its present lines. As such, the former stronghold was transformed into an impressive fortified mansion, designed to provide the residence of a wealthy prelate, quarters for a permanent garrison and lodging for important guests.

The bishops of St Davids owned extensive estates in south-west Wales and their lands in the Llawhaden area were particularly rich. Such important estates required protection, and Llawhaden Castle was built in the early 12th century for that purpose. The form of the earliest castle, a ringwork of earth and timber, may still be seen in the existing circular bank and ditch which would have protected the interior timber buildings of the bishop's residence. The bank has been reduced and later stone buildings placed on top of it, but its plan is still clear. Originally, the castle would have been entered by a wooden gate and the bank was probably surmounted by a wooden palisade. Such was the castle that Giraldus Cambrensis saw when he visited his uncle, Bishop David fitz Gerald, here in 1175. But the defensive capabilities of such castles were inevitably limited, and in 1192 the Lord Rhys, prince of Deheubarth, captured and destroyed the castle. The earliest stone buildings probably date to the early 13th century when the bishops recovered Llawhaden; the foundations of the circular tower on the south-west, and the semi-circular tower on the north-west, still survive to demonstrate the strength of these new defences.

In the late 13th and early 14th century the castle was transformed into a great fortified mansion, more appropriate as the residence of men of the standing of the bishops of St Davids. It was now equipped both with quarters for a permanent garrison and with comfortable lodgings for important guests or the bishop's entourage. Earlier buildings and defences were dramatically altered of removed altogether - although the circular shape of the ringwork still remained, the bank became a base for large new residential buildings arranged around a central court. This work was probably carried out by Bishop Thomas Beck (1293-1328). After this, there were further building phases in the later 14th century when the imposing extension to the gatehouse and the chapel tower were built, and the early 16th century when the south range was remodelled and the chapel porch added. Tradition records that the castle was dismantled by Bishop Barlow in the mid-16th century, when the bishops moved their chief residence to Abergwili near Carmarthen.

The outer part of the twin-towered gatehouse (below, left) stands to parapet level, almost the full 14th century height. The entrance is probably the most impressive part of the castle - the banded effect of the blue stone used in the masonry, the semicircular flanking towers with their heavy spurred bases and arrowslits, and the murder holes above the drawbridge combine to make the approach to the castle memorable. Behind the facade, much of the gatehouse has fallen, but the passage still retains the slots for the portcullis, and the basements of the guardrooms may be seen on either side. Originally, a large hall ran over the passage at first-floor level, and was probably used as the residence of the constable of the castle.

Across the courtyard opposite the gatehouse, was the hall. The principal rooms were on the first floor, approached by an external stair from the courtyard; they lay above vaulted ground-floor store-rooms. Two wings were attached to the hall. That on the east housed the bishop's private apartments on the first floor, while on the west was a kitchen; a bakehouse, which was built later, lies adjacent. On the east of the inner ward are the remains of the chapel, much of which has now fallen. The entrance was by a first floor doorway fronted by a slender porch and stair which still stands. The outer doorway is decorated with a crowned male head and a female head with a wimple head-dress. The small, isolated rooms in the porch above the access to the chapel probably housed the exchequer, or finance officer, of the bishop. On either side of the main gatehouse are large rooms over vaulted basements. The eastern rooms are on two floors and probably served as the well-equipped apartments of important guests of the bishop; each set had a sizable room with a fireplace, and a small bedroom with a lavatory housed in the south-west polygonal tower. The large room on the west may have been to accommodate the small garrison of armed retainers, kept at the castle by the bishops for their defence.

The later castle defences consist of the eastern and southern polygonal towers which gave a formidable appearance to the castle exterior, but in reality were less for serious defence than to provide service areas and latrines for the apartment blocks within a military-style facade. Each tower has a vaulted ground floor, which presumably functioned as the castle's prison. From the octagonal apartment rooms on the first and second floors of this tower the views of the castle courtyard are particularly fine.

NB. In the late 1990’s there was discussion about some aerial photographs which appeared to show a Roman road running from Carmarthen to Whitland and then on to Llawhaden presumably from there to the ford at Haverfordwest.

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Llysyfran         (040244)

Nowadays the whole place is dominated by the large reservoir, opened by Princess Margaret in 1972, built originally to ensure a good water supply for the Milford Haven oil industry. The little celtic church dedicated to St Meilyr has strong associations with Howel Davies, one of the best-known Pembrokeshire evangelists of the 19th century religious revivals.

(Acc/to The Pembrokeshire Coast National Park by Dillwyn Miles.)

The little church has a medieval font with claws cut in the angles of base. Its curate in 1741, the Rev. Howel Davies, embraced Nonconformity and became known as the "Apostle of Pembrokeshire"

(Acc/to The old Parish Churches of South West Wales by Mike Salter 1994.)

A semi circular baptistry recess has been formed at unknown date to contain the 14c.font. The chancel arch may be Norman

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

This benefice seems to have been in private patronage from the earliest date. In 1574 one-fourth part of the advowson of LlysY fran (subject to the life estate of Elizabeth, widow of John Philipps of Picton) belonged to William Philipps of Picton. — Inq. P.M. 16 Bliz.

1594 the Earlof Essex and [Sir John] Philipps of Picton had alternate right of presentation with John Scourfield [of New Moat] and [John] Wogan of Wiston, Pems. — (Owen's Pem.)

Llysyrane Rectoria:- Ecclesia ibidem Mauricius Jones clericus rector ibidem tenet dictam ecclesiam sine man-sione vel terris. Et de collacione dornini de Ferrers Johannis Longvile militis Willelmi Parrett et aliorum. Et valent fntetus hujumodi ecclesie communibus annis iij' vjB viijd. Inde sol' in sinodalibus et procttracionibus quol ibet a nno arch idiac o no vs ix d. Et in visit ac ion e ordinaria quOlibet tercio anno viijd. Et remanet clare 60s. 3d. Inde decima 6s. 0d. — (Valor Eccl.)

Under the heading 'Livings Discharged':—Llysivraen alias Lysyvarne R. (St. Miler. Archidiac. quolibet Snno 5s. 8d. Ordinar. quolibet tercio anno, 8d. Dom. de Ferrers and al. Pat.r., 1535; William Scourfield, Esq., 1717, and Sir John Philips alternately; Sir John Philips, 1750. Clear yearly value, £20. King’s Book, £3 0s. 5d. — (Bacon's Liber Regis.)

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Loveston             (084085)

(Acc/to South Pembrokeshire Place Names - P. Valentine Harris.)

Loveston. 1362, Lovellston. 1509 - 23, Lovelston. Lovells tun.' OE. name 'Lovel,' Anglo-french Lovell.

(Glynne Welsh Churches 1867 p 172.)

Church St Leonard: This church has a nave with small north and south transepts, chancel and western tower. The chancel arch is pointed upon imposts; on the south side is a hagioscope, square and devided by a mullion. To the south-west of the chancel is the projection common to these churches.

(RCAM Pembroke 1920 No 617.)

In the recess on the south side of the chancel is a square squint divided by a mullion, on the north is a smaller square undivided squint. Both transepts are plain vaulted.

(Acc/to The old Parish Churches of South West Wales by Mike Salter 1994.)

Tiny openings on either side of the chancel arch serve the transepts as squints. The transepts, nave, and the later medieval west tower all have pointed tunnel vaults. The porch may be 14c and the chancel is 15c. Used to have Victorian box pews till 1960's

Smith Richard 1543 Lovelston (Loveston) PRO 223/423 Churchwarden

Smith Thomas 1543 Lovelston (Loveston) PRO 223/423 Churchwarden

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

Loveston rectory appears to have always been in private patronage. The church is dedicated to St. Leonard. - (Church Plate of Pemsbrokeshire p. 54.)

Loveston Rectorias—Ecclesia ibidem 2: collacione Willelmi Butler patroli ibidern unde Willelmus Eynon clericus est rector Et valet fructus hujus beneficii cum gleba corntnunibus annis iiijii.Ys. Inde sol' quolibet ter-tio anno in visitaeione cordinaria jjd ob. Et in visitacione archidiacori pro sinoddibu 5 et procuracicnibus quolibet anno 1ii1 vJ Ft rejnanet clare £4s. 3d. Inde decirna 8s. 6d. - (Valor Eccl.)

Under the heading 'Livings Discharged':—Loweston alias Loveiston R. Ozrdinario qltolibet tertio anno 2fld. Archi. quolibet anno 4s. 6d. William Butler, Esq., 1835; John Hooked Esq., p.h.v., 1741; The Bishop, 1748; John Campbell, Esq. Clear yearly value, £12. King's Books, £4 5s. 5d. - (Bacon's Liber Regis.)

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Ludchurch             (141109)

(Acc/to South Pembrokeshire Place Names - P. Valentine Harris.)

Ludchurch. 1324, Ecclesia de Loudes. 1377 Londchirch. It has been .suggested that it is from W. Ilwyd, 'the adorable, the blessed one,' but it is more probably from the personal name 'Loud.' .

Early 13c church dedicated to St Elidyr, south aisle later

(Acc/to The old Parish Churches of South West Wales by Mike Salter 1994.)

The nave and chancel are 13c. The west tower and the south aisle are 16c. The aisle has three arches on octagonal piers towards the nave and two towards the chancel. One nave pier has a head carved upon the top of it.

The tomb of Annie Sophia grand daughter of Josiah Wedgewood decorated with some of her grandfathers first tiles is in churchyard.

Gibbe 1543 Ludchurche PRO 223/423 Churchwarden

(Acc/to "A Short Guide to Ludchurch".)

The foundations of Ludchurch as a community were laid by the Knight's of St John who were dedicated to keeping the pilgrim routes open all the way from Jerusalem to St David's and on these routes at convenient places they built hospices ( half hospitals half hostels) Ludchurch was one such site.

The Church is basically divided into two halves by a row of arches which are about 800 years old. The pillars are Norman but the arches themselves show the transition from Norman to Gothic in that they rise to a little peak. At the heads of the pillars are examples of carving with shields which would originally have carried heraldic symbols there are also some carved roses and crude faces. There are two Holy water stoups one by the entrance and another on the south wall where there was another entrance at one time but the extensive quarrying all round the church site destroyed the approach from that side. When the area was being quarried there was even an offer made to buy the Churchyard so as to quarry the site.

In June the Churchyard is carpeted with blue irises.

In the far south east corner there is what is known as the Wedgwood Tomb. "Annie Sophia", grand-daughter of Josiah Wedgwood founder of the Wedgewood pottery firm, husband is buried there. He was Wilfred Baugh Allen. When Josiah Wedgewood died in 1790 the first batch of tiles he made were shared between some of his grandchildren. "Annie Sophia" treasured hers first having them built into a fireplace at her home at Cilrhiw Mansion and then when they moved transfering them to Rosemount Tenby. At her wish they were fixed into her husband's grave.

There is also the grave of John Henry Martin who died in 1823 age 70, at his death was supposed to be the last surviving officer to have accompanied Captain Cook on his third voyage around the world.

There is also the remains of an old Cross - called the Plague Cross and the bronze lamp at the Churchyard Gate was at one time part of the street lighting in Bournemouth.

1402 July 17 Lantefey.

Also on the 17th day of the same month in the place aforesaid. the bishop granted to Sir William Rolleston, rector of the parish church of Loudchirch, of his diocese, a licence of non-residence for one year continuously from the date of these presents.

1402 Lantfey.

Also on 3 September, in the year and place abovesaid, the bishop admitted Sir John Geffrey, chaplain, to the parish church of Loudechurch vacant by the free resignation of Sir William Cade of Rolleston, last rector of the same.

1407.

Also on 24 January, in the year and place above-said, the same reverend father admitted Sir John Thomas to the parish church of Lowdechirch of our diocese, vacant by the free resignation of Sir John Geffray, last rector there, to which he was presented to the same by the noble man Francis de Courte, lord of Pembroke, true patron of the same, and he instituted him, etc.

1410 28 March.

On 28 March of the year abovesaid, the aforesaid vicar (Master John Hiot Bishop of St David) at St David’s admitted William Henry, deacon, to the parish church of Ludchurch of the diocese of St Davids, vacant by the free resignation of Sir John Thomas, last rector of the same , and pertaining for this turn to the presentation of lord Francis de Courte lord of Pembroke by occasion of the temporalities of the alien priory of Pembroke with the advowson of churches belonging to the said priory being in his hands of the grant of King Henry IV. And he instituted him etc.

(Acc/to Pembrokeshire Parsons.)

This rectory was originally in the patronage of John de Hastings, Earl of Pembroke, but afterwards came into the hands of the Crown.

Ludchurch — Ecclesia ibidem ex presentacione domine Regine unde Morganus Jones clericus est rector ibidem Et valet fructus et gleba ibidem annuatirn iiijD. Inde sol' archidiacono quolibet anno pro proreuracinnibus et sinodalibus vs ixd. Et remanet elare 74s. 3d. lnde decima 7s. 5d. - (Valor Eccl.)

Under the heading 'Livings Discharged':- Ludehurch alias Eglwys Llwy R. (St. Elider or Eliere). Archidiae. quolibet anno 5s. gd. Regina olim Patr.; The Prince of Wales. Clear yearly value £30, £40. King's Books, £3 14s 4d. - (Bacons Liber Regis.)

On 17 Jan., 1893, a faculty was obtained for the restoration of Ludchurch Parish Church.

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Lydstep             (087983)

Lydstep. Unusual, in that the village was largely built by the first Viscount St. Davids, who also built a large house for himself in Lydstep Haven. Nowadays the land along the shore is a large and beautifully landscaped caravan site. In the village are the ruins of the mysterious medieval Palace of Arms, an early first floor house above two vaulted cellars of undercrofts badly neglected.

The headland is National Trust property with a car park and nature trail. Lydstep Caverns can be explored at low tide.

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